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The Southern Colonies

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  1. The Southern Colonies Chapter 4, Section 3 • Why was Maryland important to Roman Catholics? • How were the Carolinas and Georgia founded? • What two ways of life developed in the Southern Colonies? • Why did the slave trade grow in the 1700s?

  2. Maryland Was Important to Roman Catholics Chapter 4, Section 3 • 1632—Sir George Calvert became a Roman Catholic. He asked King Charles I for a colony in the Americas for Catholics. Calvert died. His son, Lord Baltimore, took over. • 1634—Settlers arrived in Maryland. Lord Baltimore appointed a governor and council of advisers, but he let colonists elect an assembly. • 1649—Lord Baltimore asked the assembly to pass an Act of Toleration, a law that provided religious freedom for all Christians.

  3. Bacon’s Rebellion Chapter 4, Section 3 • Settlers arrived in Virginia, expecting profits from planting tobacco. • Wealthy planters already had the best lands near the coast. Newcomers were pushed farther inland, onto Indian lands. • Settlers and Indians clashed. • Settlers asked the governor for help. He wouldn’t act. • In 1676, Nathaniel Bacon organized angry frontier planters. They raided Native American villages, then burned Jamestown. • The revolt soon ended when Bacon died suddenly.

  4. Carolinas North: poor tobacco farmers from Virginia small farms South: eight English nobles Charles Town settlers from the Caribbean rice and indigo, a plant used to make blue dye enslaved Africans Georgia James Oglethorpe debtors, or people who owed money and could not pay The Carolinas and Georgia Are Founded Chapter 4, Section 3

  5. Tidewater Plantations Backcountry Land coastal plain, many rivers rolling hills, thick forests Farms large plantations small farms Crops tobacco, rice, indigo tobacco, garden crops Enslaved Africans tended Tidewater plantations Few enslaved Africans worked backcountry farms. Slavery Two Ways of Life in the Southern Colonies Chapter 4, Section 3

  6. 1619 First enslaved Africans arrived in Virginia. Some Africans remained enslaved, some were servants, a few were free. 1600s Carolina plantations needed large numbers of workers. The planters came to rely on slave labor. Early 1700s Slave ships carried millions of enslaved Africans west across the Atlantic. Colonists enacted slave codes. Many colonists displayed racism, though a few spoke out against slavery. 1700s Why the Slave Trade Grew in the 1700s Chapter 4, Section 3 slave codes—laws that set out rules for slaves’ behavior; treated enslaved Africans as property racism—the belief that one race is superior to another

  7. Section 3 Assessment Chapter 4, Section 3 The Southern Colonies were especially known for a) shipbuilding. b) fishing and whaling. c) iron. d) rice and tobacco. One reason why the slave trade grew was that a) plantations needed large numbers of workers. b) so many slaves died during the voyage. c) colonists were defying the Quakers who spoke out against it. d) sparsely populated colonies like Georgia needed more people.

  8. Section 3 Assessment Chapter 4, Section 3 The Southern Colonies were especially known for a) shipbuilding. b) fishing and whaling. c) iron. d) rice and tobacco. One reason why the slave trade grew was that a) plantations needed large numbers of workers. b) so many slaves died during the voyage. c) colonists were defying the Quakers who spoke out against it. d) sparsely populated colonies like Georgia needed more people.