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First Nations

First Nations

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First Nations

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  1. FirstNations

  2. How has the Indian Act Attempted to Define and Assimilate First Nations People? The Indian Act is a part of federal legislation. It was created in 1876 and was made to take away the rights and status of First Nations people. Originally, the Indian Act was established to assimilate First Nations peoples, but it has been amended many times over the years.

  3. How has the Indian Act Attempted to Define and Assimilate First Nations People? The original Indian Act was made when Europeans believed they were superior to all other cultures. The Indian Act was created without consulting First Nations peoples. The Indian Act affected First Nations peoples because they had already made Treaties with Canada’s government. The Indian Act went against key sections of their signed Treaties.

  4. How has the Indian Act Attempted to Define and Assimilate First Nations People? Throughout history the Indian Act: • Forced First Nations peoples to receive permission from the government to wear their traditional clothing • Took away First Nation’s right to hold traditional ceremonies such as the Sundance of the Siksika • Prevented First Nations from traveling freely

  5. How has the Indian Act Attempted to Define and Assimilate First Nations People? The Indian Act disrupted traditional forms of government. • New regulations were added about who qualified as members of a band • New regulations also determined who could vote in band elections • The roles of woman and Elders were impacted negatively. They were no longer able to take part in official processes of the government even though First Nations peoples viewed men and woman as equals and Elders as respected leaders. (When the Indian Act was put in place, women had less rights than men. For example they were not allowed to vote.)

  6. How has the Indian Act Attempted to Define and Assimilate First Nations People? The Indian Act did not permit First Nations peoples to take political actions. Until 1960, the Indian Act forced First Nations peoples to give up their legal identity and Treaty rights in order to gain the right to vote in a political election.

  7. How has the Indian Act Attempted to Define and Assimilate First Nations People? When the Indian Act was first put in place, the government believed First Nations peoples needed guidance. The Canadian government appointed Indian Agents to run reserves. These people were put into place without consulting First Nations peoples. Indian Agents had the power to do many things. For example, they had to give written permission to any person wishing to leave the reserve.

  8. How has the Indian Act Attempted to Define and Assimilate First Nations People? The government viewed First Nations peoples as people who needed help in the way they ran their lives. The government believed First Nations peoples were not properly educating their children. Under the Indian Act, the responsibility of educating First Nations children belonged to the federal government. This led to the opening of residential schools.

  9. How has the Indian Act Attempted to Define and Assimilate First Nations People? Residential schools were created to assimilate Aboriginal peoples into the more dominate culture of English-speaking, Christians. Due to the difference in the cultures, there were many conflicts between traditional Aboriginal values and customs and those which were being taught in the schools.

  10. How has the Indian Act Attempted to Define and Assimilate First Nations People? Residential schools were put into place in the 1820’s, but it was not mandatory for Aboriginal children to attend the schools until 1920.

  11. How has the Indian Act Attempted to Define and Assimilate First Nations People? Aboriginal children spent most of their time away from their families. Residential schools prohibited Aboriginal children from following traditional customs or speaking their own language. At residential schools, Aboriginal children were taught that all aspects of their culture were inferior and wrong. As a result of this, many children became ashamed of their language, culture, and families. Thomas Moore before and after his entrance into the Regina Residential School in Saskatchewan in 1874.