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INTERIOR ALASKA PARKS Post-Workshop Brainstorming Session: WHERE DO WE GO FROM HERE? May 9 , 2012. Climate Change Planning in Alaska’s National Parks. Common Issues. Education Co-management Cooperation at local level Budget issues Data coordination Monitoring.

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Climate Change Planning in Alaska’s National Parks


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interior alaska parks post workshop brainstorming session where do we go from here may 9 2012
INTERIOR ALASKA PARKS

Post-Workshop Brainstorming Session:

WHERE DO WE GO FROM HERE?

May 9, 2012

Climate Change Planning in Alaska’s National Parks

common issues
Common Issues
  • Education
  • Co-management
  • Cooperation at local level
  • Budget issues
  • Data coordination
  • Monitoring
important management actions
Important Management Actions

Important Common Management Actions between two groups (1A & 1B)

Revisit management policies

Identify bottlenecks to change in mgmt and address need to expedite process

Increased invasive/introduced species management

Cooperative planning with tribes to address changing resources, etc.

Policy and harvest regulations for new species

Adjust harvest regulations and seasons for traditional species

Cross-boundary collaborative approach – need to partner with other countries, agencies, stakeholders, etc.

Access planning (e.g., erosion)

Development plan model (for permafrost, trails, road, access, facilities, etc.)

Increased development of alternative energy sources (response to cost of fuel)

Research and information needs common between two groups (1A & 1B)

Baseline data on river flow

Baseline archeological research to address potential loss

Research on phonological timing/mis-timing

Increase capacity for interpretation/education

Improved monitoring = fire effects, glaciers, fisheries, megafauna

Increase social science to reach technology and citizen scientists

Other Issues

Secondary effects of ocean acidification

Predator control

Lack of funding/personnel/support

Economic limitations (beyond park funding, e.g. for communities)

Increased pressure for resource extraction

Motivate management to focus on climate change issues

Moose farming? Reindeer herding? More fish hatcheries?

Wilderness designation?

Pressure to redefine park boundaries/zoning (split up large parks?)

Volcanic eruptions/earthquakes

RS2477s becoming roads

Prepare for evolving health & safety issues

More hazards management and training for NSF employees

important management actions1
Important Management Actions
  • Assisted migration, e.g. wood bison – develop a strategy
  • Maintaining genetic diversity for core species (Dall sheep)
  • Managed fire and prescribed burns by park staff
  • Change the regulation process to be more flexible and provide a quicker response to the needs of subsistence users. Work with SRC, OSM, RA
  • Foster and encourage subsistence lifestyles and sources of knowledg
  • More fuels reduction – firewise
  • Greater work with communities
  • Examine whether fire can be used as a tool to help avoid catastrophic fires
  • Partner with DEC to address health issues related to smoke
  • Research and information needs common between two groups (2A & 2B)
  • Identify and study ecological change so as to attribute cause and effect, e.g. caribou fading due to CC not bus traffic. Collect into fon hunting seasons and wildlife viewing.
  • Improved monitoring of rare plants
  • Assess human preferences and tolerances regarding smoke and fire effects from natural and prescribed fire
  • Anticipate consequences of ecological actions:
      • Bringing in bison
      • Losing caribou, Dall sheep, pika
  • Assisted migration, e.g. wood bison – develop a strategy
  • Maintaining genetic diversity for core species (Dall sheep)
  • Managed fire and prescribed burns by park staff
  • Creating interpretive materials, interacting with existing and new educational groups, and direct one on one interactions
  • Big-picture planning
  • Redo all park plans to be robust under climate change
  • Build new roads to improve recreation opportunities and to offset lost visitors, and megafauna viewing
  • Shift the climbing season
  • Explore and address issues for climbers given basecamp challenges
  • Build stewardship and contact with children
  • Expand school programs with longer season
  • Build capacity for climate change messaging
  • Develop in-park messaging that addresses climate change issues and implications to ensure improved and more consistent understanding among park staff
  • Engage more with subsistence leaders to improve understanding of chand and collaborate to create messages and garner support to address issues
possible products
Possible Products

Report

pros

  • Includes all details on process, results, scientific background, narratives, and discussion
  • Can be peer-reviewed; “official”
  • Can also be made available on line

cons

  • Too long and unwieldy for many audiences
  • Expensive to produce (full color printing, binding, etc.
possible products1
Possible Products

Poster

pros

  • Includes some details on process, results, scientific background, narratives, and discussion
  • Highly portable
  • Many venues for presentation; wide range of audiences
  • Can also be made available on line

cons

  • Too brief to convey the full depth of the process and results
  • Can’t fully convey narratives
  • Risk of misinterpretation
possible products2
Possible Products

Video/Youtube

pros

  • Can be made available on line
  • Appealing and accessible to a wide range of audiences; compelling
  • Excellent format for narratives

cons

  • Risk of misinterpretation
  • May be considered less “official” or “serious”
  • Difficult to include all information and background
possible products3
Possible Products
  • Curriculum
  • Trainings
  • Community meetings
  • Workshops
  • Audio/podcast
  • Other?
links to snap products
Links to SNAP products
  • Maps, graphs, and charts of climate projections
  • By region or by park
  • Temperature, precipitation, season length, thaw, freeze, other?
slide11

Central Alaska

Date of Freeze Projections

5-model average

A1B scenario

2010s

2090s

2050s

slide12

Central Alaska

Date of Thaw Projections

5-model average

A1B scenario

2010s

2050s

2090s

slide13

Central Alaska

Length of Growing Season Projections

5-model average

A1B scenario

2010s

2050s

2090s

links to public education topics
Links to public education topics

PDO education

  • Poorly informed public
  • Strong impacts on perception of climate change
links to public education topics1
Links to public education topics

Fire

  • Public knowledge?
  • Effects on tipping points

Bettles fire 2004 http://www.wunderground.com/wximage/AlaskaMark/11?gallery=

slide16

Links to public education topics

Rain vs Snow and

Extreme Events

  • Important in workshop process
  • Uncertain
  • Important
  • Effects on tipping points

http://neven1.typepad.com/blog/arctic-storms/

surveys
Surveys

Audiences?

Questions to ask?

Information gaps?

Ways to use the results?

NPS limits on surveys

Other groups that can do this?

the power of story
The power of story

“Pretty Sunsets” / Is There Anyone Out There?Look at that sunset . Pretty ain't it ... Damn! Sometimes I wish I were not so beautiful.Sometimes people just see the beauty, but they don't really see me.Name's Gaia ... People call me Mother Earth ... or you can call me “The land.”

(Waves dismissively) Whatever ...Whatever ... That would sum up my life today: "Whatever"

Let me tell you:I've always tried to take care of myself. I had a lot of self-control. (Straightens up)Sure, I'd go through phases - doesn't everybody - but I kept it together.But now, I'm not so sure. I'm starting to feel out of balance.(aside) Whew, it's hot in here. Are you hot?

Used to be I felt I had plants on all the right places.Tall trees, willows, beautiful little tundra flowers of all different colors ...And berries - oo-oo Baby! I was fecund!But then things started to change. It's like my soul just dried up.All of a sudden I've got shrubs squeezing out my grasses and flowers….

…(continued)

the power of song
The power of song

The Northland is a Changin’

Come gather round people

Wherever you roam

And admit that the waters

Around you have gone

And accept it that soon

You’ll be dry to the bone

If your salmon to you

Are worth savin’

Then start takin’ a stand

Or the fish will be gone

For the rivers they are a changin’…

…(continued)

the power of maps
The power of maps

Landscapes of Change

  • An interpretive guide
  • to Denali National Park
  • Last updated April 17, 2050
slide27

Subsistence

North Road

Wood Bison

Trails

Fire

South Road

Permafrost/Wetlands

slide28

Interpreting Landscape Change

In the past several decades, (starting in 2011) we have developed an integrated set of interpretive and educational materials focused on the issue of Denali’s changing landscapes in response to climate change. We use a variety of different resources including paired historical-recent photos, quantitative data from the parks long term vegetation monitoring program, and materials from various scientific research studies to develop a suite of exhibits and information about how the Park landscape has changed over time in response to the changing climate. The flagship product from this work is the “climate change holodeck” which allows visitors to experience several decades of accelerated vegetation change in a sensaround 3D virtual reality environment. For example, the visitor can experience first-hand the thrill of repeated high-intensity crown fires that have occurred in the warmed park landscape. The products will include displays at the visitors center, web exhibits, technical reports to communicate the changes that have occurred in the Park.

slide29

Subsistence

North Road

Wood Bison

Trails

Fire

South Road

Permafrost/Wetlands

slide30

Subsistence

Denali subsistence users have worked with NPS managers to modify hunting laws and policy to adapt as much as possible to the warmer and more moist climate we see today. Examples of the changes include broader hunting seasons and harvest methods that better mimic natural predation. The park managers have worked with subsistence users to help communicate these changing subsistence patterns to the public so that they can better understand the role of subsistence in a changing world. Working together we have been able to maintain subsistence as a viable lifestyle and continue the connectivity of people to the land.

missing links

Decision Tree, with uncertainty

Missing Links

Players not at the table

  • Lacking full personal buy-in at all levels
  • Some superintendants were not there – high level managers needed
  • Businesses/concessions

Shortened training process

  • How would a one-day workshop work?
  • People need to leave the workshop with definite follow-up tasks to take back to the park

More communities

  • Understanding of culture and values
  • Place-based education
next steps
Next Steps

Come up with some kind of worksheet that inserts scenario planning into general planning

Three days is NOT too long if people are personally invested in the process and in carrying forward the goals defined during the workshop

  • Everyone needs an assignment – a personal action step, and perhaps a 6-month group goal and a one year group goal
  • This should be clear on day one

Using the scenario planning process in other areas

  • Empowering people in other planning, not necessarily climate change related
  • How do we change how we do business?