major lifestyle changes the middle ages to 1800 n.
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Major Lifestyle Changes: The Middle Ages to 1800 PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Major Lifestyle Changes: The Middle Ages to 1800

Loading in 2 Seconds...

  share
play fullscreen
1 / 69
Download Presentation

Major Lifestyle Changes: The Middle Ages to 1800 - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

133 Views
Download Presentation

Major Lifestyle Changes: The Middle Ages to 1800

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. Major Lifestyle Changes:The Middle Ages to 1800

  2. 1450 to 1750: Beginning of commerce

  3. 1450 to 1750: Beginning of commerce • No monetary system in place.

  4. 1450 to 1750: Beginning of commerce • No monetary system in place. • Bartering was used exclusively.

  5. 1450 to 1750: Beginning of commerce • No monetary system in place. • Bartering was used exclusively. • Trading what you have for what you want.

  6. 1450 to 1750: Beginning of commerce • No monetary system in place. • Bartering was used exclusively. • Trading what you have for what you want. • Manors grew what they could and bartered for the rest.

  7. 1450 to 1750: Beginning of commerce • No monetary system in place. • Bartering was used exclusively. • Trading what you have for what you want. • Manors grew what they could and bartered for the rest. • This system encouraged specialization in goods.

  8. 1450 to 1750: Beginning of commerce • No monetary system in place. • Bartering was used exclusively. • Trading what you have for what you want. • Manors grew what they could and bartered for the rest. • This system encouraged specialization in goods. • Increasing profits helped to sustain the new system.

  9. Change in the Wind: • Farming improvements led to more food being produced.

  10. Change in the Wind: • Farming improvements led to more food being produced. • Leads to population increases

  11. Change in the Wind: • Farming improvements led to more food being produced. • Leads to population increases • Increased market demand for cloth due to population increases.

  12. Change in the Wind: • Farming improvements led to more food being produced. • Leads to population increases • Increased market demand for cloth due to population increases. • Cottage Industry: textile manufacturing in the home with all members of the family helping make cloth.

  13. Change in the Wind: • Farming improvements led to more food being produced. • Leads to population increases • Increased market demand for cloth due to population increases. • Cottage Industry: textile manufacturing in the home with all members of the family helping make cloth. • This leads us to the INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION.

  14. Industrial Revolution

  15. Industrial Revolution • 1750-1800:

  16. Industrial Revolution • 1750-1800: • the European manufacturing process shifted from small, home production to large-scale, machine production.

  17. Industrial Revolution • 1750-1800: • the European manufacturing process shifted from small, home production to large-scale, machine production. • Started in the textile industry.

  18. Industrial Revolution • 1750-1800: • the European manufacturing process shifted from small, home production to large-scale, machine production. • Started in the textile industry. • Factory System: machines and workers brought together in large buildings.

  19. Industrial Revolution • 1750-1800: • the European manufacturing process shifted from small, home production to large-scale, machine production. • Started in the textile industry. • Factory System: machines and workers brought together in large buildings. • Division of labor: Each worker did one specific part of the process.

  20. Inventions: • Major Inventions Changed the Textile Industry

  21. Inventions: • Major Inventions Changed the Textile Industry • Spinning Jenny: James Hartgrove 1768

  22. Inventions: • Major Inventions Changed the Textile Industry • Spinning Jenny: James Hartgrove 1768 • Water Frame: Richard Arkwright

  23. Inventions: • Major Inventions Changed the Textile Industry • Spinning Jenny: James Hartgrove 1768 • Water Frame: Richard Arkwright • Cotton Gin: Eli Whitney 1793

  24. Inventions: • Major Inventions Changed the Textile Industry • Spinning Jenny: James Hartgrove 1768 • Water Frame: Richard Arkwright • Cotton Gin: Eli Whitney 1793 • Transportation Increases

  25. Inventions: • Major Inventions Changed the Textile Industry • Spinning Jenny: James Hartgrove 1768 • Water Frame: Richard Arkwright • Cotton Gin: Eli Whitney 1793 • Transportation Increases • Better Roads

  26. Inventions: • Major Inventions Changed the Textile Industry • Spinning Jenny: James Hartgrove 1768 • Water Frame: Richard Arkwright • Cotton Gin: Eli Whitney 1793 • Transportation Increases • Better Roads • Canals (human-made waterways)

  27. Inventions: • Major Inventions Changed the Textile Industry • Spinning Jenny: James Hartgrove 1768 • Water Frame: Richard Arkwright • Cotton Gin: Eli Whitney 1793 • Transportation Increases • Better Roads • Canals (human-made waterways) • Railroads

  28. Inventions: • Major Inventions Changed the Textile Industry • Spinning Jenny: James Hartgrove 1768 • Water Frame: Richard Arkwright • Cotton Gin: Eli Whitney 1793 • Transportation Increases • Better Roads • Canals (human-made waterways) • Railroads • Steam Engines: Developed by James Watt

  29. Inventions: • Steam engine: James Watts 1785, revolutionized factory work.

  30. Powering the Industrial Revolution:

  31. Powering the Industrial Revolution: • Started with Water Power: Machines worked due to the flow of water wheels built on rivers.

  32. Powering the Industrial Revolution: • Started with Water Power: Machines worked due to the flow of water wheels built on rivers. • Steam engines: Steam boats by 1808 used to transport goods and people across the water much faster with larger amounts.

  33. Fueling the machines:

  34. Fueling the machines: • Factories need fuel to run the machines: COAL

  35. Fueling the machines: • Factories need fuel to run the machines: COAL • Coal mining expands: Production doubles from 1750 to 1800.

  36. Fueling the machines: • Factories need fuel to run the machines: COAL • Coal mining expands: Production doubles from 1750 to 1800. • Large cities grow up near coal and iron fields.

  37. Factories need fuel to run the machines: COAL • Coal mining expands: Production doubles from 1750 to 1800. • Large cities grow up near coal and iron fields.

  38. Labor issues

  39. Labor issues • The raw wool and cotton that fed the British textile mills came from:

  40. Labor issues • The raw wool and cotton that fed the British textile mills came from: • Lands converted from farming to raising sheep, leaving farm workers without jobs

  41. Labor issues • The raw wool and cotton that fed the British textile mills came from: • Lands converted from farming to raising sheep, leaving farm workers without jobs • Urbanization: movement of people from rural to urban (city) areas

  42. Conditions in the cities:

  43. Conditions in the cities: • Housing, water, sewers, food supplies, and lighting were completely inadequate.

  44. Conditions in the cities: • Housing, water, sewers, food supplies, and lighting were completely inadequate. • Slums grew and disease destroyed the population.

  45. Conditions in the cities: • Housing, water, sewers, food supplies, and lighting were completely inadequate. • Slums grew and disease destroyed the population. • Crime increased and became a way of life for those who could make a living in no other way.

  46. Conditions in the countryside:

  47. Conditions in the countryside: • The only successful farmers were those with large landholdings who could afford agricultural innovations.

  48. Conditions in the countryside: • The only successful farmers were those with large landholdings who could afford agricultural innovations. • Most peasants:

  49. Conditions in the countryside: • The only successful farmers were those with large landholdings who could afford agricultural innovations. • Most peasants: • Didn’t have enough land to support themselves

  50. Conditions in the countryside: • The only successful farmers were those with large landholdings who could afford agricultural innovations. • Most peasants: • Didn’t have enough land to support themselves • Were forced to move to the cities to find work in the factories.