outside of social movements dilemmas of indigenous handicrafts vendors in guatemala n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Outside of Social Movements: Dilemmas of indigenous handicrafts vendors in Guatemala PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Outside of Social Movements: Dilemmas of indigenous handicrafts vendors in Guatemala

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 11

Outside of Social Movements: Dilemmas of indigenous handicrafts vendors in Guatemala - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 84 Views
  • Uploaded on

Outside of Social Movements: Dilemmas of indigenous handicrafts vendors in Guatemala. Walter Little. THE MAYA MOVEMENT. Objective: to Politically unify Mayas on the basis of shared ethnicity & cultural identity Then why did Maya handicraft vendors reject the Maya Movement?.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Outside of Social Movements: Dilemmas of indigenous handicrafts vendors in Guatemala' - delta


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
outside of social movements dilemmas of indigenous handicrafts vendors in guatemala

Outside of Social Movements: Dilemmas of indigenous handicrafts vendors in Guatemala

Walter Little

the maya movement
THE MAYA MOVEMENT
  • Objective: to Politically unify Mayas on the basis of shared ethnicity & cultural identity
  • Then why did Maya handicraft vendors reject the Maya Movement?
maya handicraft vendors
Maya handicraft vendors
  • Have sold handicrafts to international tourists since the 1930s
  • But the military government & civil war of the 1980s curtailed most of their activities
  • Social & political changes in the late 1980s & early 1990s contributed to growth of vending again
      • With the end of the war, the tourism commission promoted international tourism
slide4

In 1992,the city government suspended the Sunday handicrafts market and relocated vendors to a monastery

  • Vendors created an artisans’ association for economic & political actions
artisans association
Artisans’ association
  • To prevent being expelled from their marketplace
  • Make the marketplace attractive to tourists
  • Lobby the city government for services
  • Convince tourists the marketplace was clean & safe
  • Show city officials they were organized & unified
  • Agreed to sell only handmade crafts
the politics of mayan identity
The politics of Mayan identity
  • Vendors use identity, but it is in part in response to tourists’ interests
      • …and to vendors’ economic & political interests
      • Global tourism helps them in their struggle against political problems & discrimination at national & local levels
        • Ladinos discriminate against them
        • They don’t create revenue for the city, so the mayor’s office charges them for non-existent services
        • Police harass them & fine them
tactics used
Tactics used
  • Politics of representing Maya cultures
      • Vending as a theatrical performance
      • Selling identity via dramatization
  • Use code-switching to keep Ladinos & tourists from understanding them
  • Maya language (Kaqchikel) establishes their Mayanness to tourists
  • Weaving on backstrap loom
  • Use of colorful traje to create image of the Mayan woman
slide8

Most successful vendors are women

  • They contribute to maintenance of their households, yet are relatively wealthy
  • Tourists seek out images of Maya women they have seen in guidebooks
  • Vendors hide their radios, calculators
  • Essentialized identities—as Mayan Indians for tourists and as “artisans” for Ladinos
the maya movement1
The maya movement
  • To build a national movement & unite all Mayans
    • Based on culture & identity
  • Maya intellectuals denounce racism & foreign scholarship due to their representations of Mayan culture
slide10

“maya vendors, working between international tourism & essentializedmaya& ladinos’ racializedindian identities, are reluctant to embrace the maya movement”

    • The Maya Movement dictates which traits make up Maya identity
    • Vendors shift identity depending on who they are dealing with
      • Ladinos & tourists equate Mayans with a pre-Columbian past
      • “We can be Mayas for tourists, if they want”
  • “The Maya Movement doesn’t know anything about business”
    • Vendors unite over marketing (economic) issues
    • “We are artisans” (vs. vendors); a more neutral identity when dealing with city officials & police
    • they use “Maya” only when dealing with tourists
slide11

The Maya Movement does not address unemployment or health care

  • Vendors use identity to help them earn a better living in the global economy