Objective: To examine the cultural changes brought about by the Jazz Age. - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Objective: To examine the cultural changes brought about by the Jazz Age. PowerPoint Presentation
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Objective: To examine the cultural changes brought about by the Jazz Age.

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Objective: To examine the cultural changes brought about by the Jazz Age.
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Objective: To examine the cultural changes brought about by the Jazz Age.

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  1. Objective: To examine the cultural changes brought about by the Jazz Age. Do Now: Define the term fad, then make a list of fads that you know of. Fad – activity or fashion that is very popular for a short time Video: MC Hammer – “Can’t Touch This” (1990) Anyone remember parachute pants? I’m sure MC Hammer does!

  2. 1920’s: Fads and Fashions • Fads caught on quickly during the 1920’s. Ex.) dance marathons, flagpole sitting How about flagpole skating? (0:55)

  3. Flapper – young woman in the 1920’s who declared her independence from traditional rules.

  4. How did flappers rebel against traditional ways of thinking? 1) short, bobbed hair 2) bright-red lipstick

  5. How did flappers rebel against traditional ways of thinking? 3) short skirts

  6. How did flappers rebel against traditional ways of thinking? 4) smoked cigarettes in public

  7. How did flappers rebel against traditional ways of thinking? 5) drank alcohol in speakeasies (left) Latest thing in flasks. A dancer shows off the garter flask fad in Washington, D.C.(Jan.26, 1926) (right) Woman putting flask in her Russian boot, Washington, D.C. (Jan. 21, 1922)

  8. How did flappers rebel against traditional ways of thinking? 6) danced at jazz clubs

  9. Louise Brooks, 1920’s

  10. Video: Flappers – 1920’s (6:24)

  11. Jazz Age · Jazz music was created by African-Americans by combining African rhythms and European harmonies. Ex.) Louis Armstrongwas one of the first famous jazz musicians of the 1920’s. Video: “Tiger Rag” by, Louis Armstrong 1932 (2:57)

  12. · Jazz music brought new forms of dancing. Ex.) the Charleston and the shimmy Video: The Charleston – Harlem, NY, 1950’s (1:50) Contemporary Application: Video: Get Lite – Bronx, NY, 2007 (4:13)

  13. · Older Americans worried that jazz music was a bad influence on the nation’s young people. The Jazz Age , 1929 movie poster

  14. Audio: Roll ‘em Girls, Roll ‘em, performed by Billy Murray (1925) Listen girls Listen girls, I've a word for you just because you're up to date and do the things you do Don't let anyone tell you that you don't act nice You're as sweet as grandma was so take my advice Roll 'Em Girls Roll 'Em Go ahead an Roll 'EmRoll them down and show your pretty knees Roll 'Em Girls Roll 'Em, Everybody roll emRoll em high or low just as you please Don't let people tell you that it's shockingSave your sweeties picture on your stocking Laugh at ma, laugh at pa, give them all the ha haRoll emgirlies roll ‘em roll your own Roll 'Em Girls Roll 'Em, Go ahead an Roll 'EmRoll them down and please the traffic cop

  15. Roll 'Em Girls Roll 'Em, Everybody roll emWhen you cross the street the traffic stops Even grouchy traffic cops get jolly When they see you step into a trolley Red light's on, Red light's off Cops are only human Roll em girlies roll ‘em roll your own Listen girls Listen girls, When you bobbed your hair You were criticized a lot, But still you didn't care When you shortened your dresses, You gave us some shock But we never thought that soon, You'd be wearing socks! Roll 'Em Girls Roll 'Em, Go ahead and Roll 'EmIn the winter spring summer or fall Roll 'Em Girls Roll 'Em, Everybody roll ‘emAnywhere or time or place at all

  16. Young girls, old girls, sweethearts wives and mothers Young maids, old maids, even our grandmothers I well know rain or snow, Girlies must be stylish Roll em girlies roll ‘em roll your own Roll 'Em Girls Roll 'EmGo ahead and Roll 'EmRoll em where you think they look the best Roll 'Em Girls Roll 'EmEverybody roll emRoll em north and south and east and west Nowadays you girlies have your freedom Don't wear things if you don't think you need them! Laugh at ma, laugh at pa Give them all the ha haRoll em girlies roll ‘em roll your own!

  17. Harlem Renaissance – flowering of African American culture in the 1920’s “Incident” by, Countee Cullen Once riding in old Baltimore, Heart-filled, head-filled with glee, I saw a Baltimorean Keep looking straight at me. Now I was eight and very small, And he was no whit bigger, And so I smiled, but he poked out His tongue, and called me, "Nigger." I saw the whole of Baltimore From May until December; Of all the things that happened there That's all that I remember. Examples: Countee Cullen – writer/poet

  18. Harlem Renaissance – flowering of African American culture in the 1920’s “Harlem” by, Langston Hughes What happens to a dream deferred? Does it dry up like a raisin in the sun? Or fester like a sore— And then run? Does it stink like rotten meat? Or crust and sugar over— like a syrupy sweet? Maybe it just sags like a heavy load. Or does it explode? Examples: Langston Hughes – writer / poet

  19. Harlem Renaissance – flowering of African American culture in the 1920’s Examples: Zora Neale Hurston – writer / poet “The whole matter revolves around the self-respect of my people. How much satisfaction can I get from a court order for somebody to associate with me who does not wish me near them?” - Zora Neale Hurston (1955)

  20. Harlem Renaissance – flowering of African American culture in the 1920’s Examples: Aaron Douglas - painter Into Bondage (1936) The Harlem Renaissance (2:53)