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Recession As the Mother of Invention: New Models for Hard Times. Rick Anderson Associate Director Scholarly Resources & Collections. How hard are these times?. IMLS/LSTA cuts are certain; only the depth is in question (14% or 100%?) University budget situations range from flat to free-fall

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recession as the mother of invention new models for hard times

Recession As the Mother of Invention:New Models for Hard Times

Rick Anderson

Associate Director

Scholarly Resources & Collections

how hard are these times
How hard are these times?
  • IMLS/LSTA cuts are certain; only the depth is in question (14% or 100%?)
  • University budget situations range from flat to free-fall
    • Browne Report proposes 40% cut to UK higher education
    • Nevada higher education system preparing for functional bankruptcy
    • U of Utah preparing for another 7% cut (after a 19% cut in 2009)
    • California’s governor proposes 18% cut to CSU, 17% to UC
  • Serial prices continue to rise at roughly 9% annually (books at 3-5%)
use of libraries shifting radically
Use of Libraries Shifting Radically
  • Printed books are nearly unused
  • Libraries are heavily used as study spaces
  • Social spaces and research spaces are decreasingly distinguishable—in both physical and online realms
  • No one begins an information search on a library website
  • “Ask-an-Expert” site use is exploding—but “expert” does not mean “librarian” (cf. OCLC’s “Perceptions of Libraries, 2010”)
  • Ready-reference means Wikipedia or Google
current realities and controlling truths
Current realities and controlling truths
  • The book is a database
    • In most cases, e is not just better than p, but miles better
  • Journal issues/subscriptions don’t matter
    • Articles do; the subscription is just a miniature Big Deal
  • The library collection is an ungainly, expensive, inaccurate attempt to divine the future
  • Models don’t matter; only prices do
  • Patron’s environment is one of information glut and attention deficit
new models follow from these realities
New models follow from these realities
  • Online  just-in-time (both e and p)
  • Online  breakdown of collection walls
  • Higher prices/less budget  less speculation
  • Higher prices/less budget  less archival purchasing
  • Less circulation  strong e-only momentum
  • Online + better data + higher prices + less budget  the end of the Big Deal and of the Medium Deal (title-level journal subscriptions) in favor of the Tiny Deal

Bottom line: Less collecting, more brokerage

bottom line
Bottom line
  • The future of the library will not look much like a library
    • Small, focused collections of books
    • Few subscriptions, if any
    • No packages
    • A need for consolidated brokerage service at article level, not title level
  • Journals are going the way of the record album
    • We’re headed back to a “song” economy
  • Journal publishers are going the way of the record label
    • You can’t make as much on a 99-cent song as you can on a $15 album
contact
Contact

rick.anderson@utah.edu