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Musical Perspective on the Roman Missal, Third post-Vatican II Edition: Opportunities and Challenges. 30 April 2011 Fr. Jan Michael Joncas. Overview of the 3rd post-Vatican II edition of the Roman Missal. Post-Vatican II Roman Rite Eucharist. 1969: Ordo Missae

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musical perspective on the roman missal third post vatican ii edition opportunities and challenges

Musical Perspective on the Roman Missal, Third post-Vatican II Edition: Opportunities and Challenges

30 April 2011

Fr. Jan Michael Joncas

post vatican ii roman rite eucharist
Post-Vatican II Roman Rite Eucharist
  • 1969: OrdoMissae
  • 1970: MissaleRomanum, editiotypica
  • [1974: USA Sacramentary]
  • 1975: MissaleRomanum, editiotypicaaltera
  • [1985: USA Sacramentary]
  • 2002/2008: MissaleRomanum, editiotypicatertia
  • [2011: USA Roman Missal]
2002 2008 missale romanum editio typica tertia emendata
2002/2008: Missaleromanumeditiotypicatertia (emendata)
  • 2008 corrects spelling, grammatical and typographical errors in 2002 (e.g. “unum” in Apostles’ Creed as well as the Nicene-Constantinopolitan Creed)
  • Both include revised GIRM (5th ed.)
  • Three new dismissals appear in the Order of Mass: “Go, proclaiming the Gospel of the Lord;” “Go in peace, glorifying the Lord with your (pl) life;” “Go in peace.”
  • Certain saints’ designations left out in 2002 are restored in 2008
  • Vigil Mass formularies for Epiphany, Ascension and Pentecost appear
  • Prayers over the People for each day of Lent appear
slide6

Apostles’ Creed is recommended especially during Lent and Easter

  • Layout of Masses for Various Needs and Occasions
  • Insertion of St. Pius of Pietrelcina (“Padre Pio”) (23 Sep) / St. John DidacusCuauhtlatoatzin (“Juan Diego”)(9 Dec) / Our Lady of Guadalupe (12 December) into the General Roman Calendar with proper collects
  • Inclusion of Eucharistic Prayers for Reconciliation I and II + for Various Needs and Occasions in an Appendix to the OrdoMissae [NOT at the end of the book]
  • Relegation of the Eucharistic Prayers for Children to a separate Book
  • Emendations to Holy Week
    • http://www.usccb.org/liturgy/innews/012003.shtml
    • http://www.usccb.org/liturgy/innews/03042003.shtml
order of mass approved 2006
Order of Mass Approved – 2006
  • June 15, 2006
  • English translation of the Order of Mass approved by the USCCB. After more than two years of review and consultation and three drafts, the English translation of the Order of Mass, along with a number of adaptations for the Dioceses of the United States, is approved. After the text of the Order of Mass was completed, each of the remaining 11 sections of the Roman Missal were presented in similar fashion.
order of mass confirmed 2008
Order of Mass Confirmed – 2008
  • June 23, 2008
  • English translation of the Order of Mass confirmed by the Holy See. While the revised translation of the Order of Mass cannot yet be used in the celebration of the Mass, the Vatican Congregation for Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments granted the recognitio in order that catechesis on the revised texts could begin and musical settings of the texts could be prepared.
u s a roman missal approved 2009
U.S.A. Roman Missal Approved – 2009
  • November 17, 2009
  • Final segments of the Roman Missal (third edition) approved by the U.S. Bishops.
  • Concluding a lengthy process that began with the publication of the MissaleRomanum, editiotypicatertiain 2002, the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops gives its approval to the final sections of the English translation of the third edition of the Roman Missal. (Other sections were approved in November 2008 and June 2009.) While the Holy See prepares and approves a final text, a remote catechetical period is underway to prepare clergy and lay faithful in the United States to receive the new translation.
where we are now
Where We Are Now
  • Recognitio for 2010 English translation of Ordo Missae/3rd post-Vatican II edition of the Roman Missal granted
  • To be used in dioceses of the United States beginning the First Sunday of Advent, 2011.
  • Publishers are preparing the altar books, participation aids, hymnals and catechetical materials needed to prepare ourselves and our congregations for the changes
slide12

Kerygma (“Heralding”) = Evangelical Music

  • Didache (“Teaching”) = Catechetical Music
  • Koinonia (“Communion”) = Fellowship Music
  • Martyria (“Witness”) = Profession Music
  • Diakonia (“Service”) = Therapeutic Music
  • Leitourgia (“Worship”) = Liturgical Music
ten opportunities and challenges
Ten Opportunities and Challenges
  • To educate ourselves and our people on the meaning of the texts and ceremonies of the Mass (General Instruction of the Roman Missal [5th edition])
  • To educate ourselves and our people on the Church’s understanding of liturgical music (Sing to the Lord: Music in Divine Worship)
  • To assess our present practices and understandings in the light of the Church’s guidelines (personnel, acoustic resources, participation aids, etc.)
slide14

To “retire” parts of our repertoire that may not accord well with the Church’s understanding of liturgical music

  • To reclaim important elements of our liturgical music heritage that may have fallen out of use
  • To learn and implement new repertoire that might accord more closely with the Church’s understanding of liturgical music
slide15

To learn and model how to “sing the Mass” and not simply “sing while Mass is going on”

  • To learn and model “full, conscious and active participation” in the liturgy and not simply musical performance
  • To collaborate with the leadership and volunteers of the worshiping community in developing a unified experience of worship (e.g., priest, deacon, preacher(s), reader(s), ministers of holy communion, acolytes, ministers of hospitality, visual artists, etc.)
analysis of ritual dimension
Analysis of Ritual Dimension
  • Textual Genres (dialogues and acclamations, antiphons and psalms, refrains and repeated responses, hymns)
  • Musical Elements (pitch, volume, duration, timbre, scale, texture, form)
  • Ritual Settings (music alone, music + action, music + text, music + text accompanying an action)
slide28

Pitch

    • Congregation: C c // Abeb
    • Choral: melody probably placed in alto line // possible settings in which SB sing in octaves with T above the melody and A below the melody
    • Instrumental: emulate organ, i.e., bass BELOW range of congregational singing to ground harmony and establish meter; mid-range IN THE MIDST of congregational singing to establish harmony; descants ABOVE the congregational singing to offer contrasts
  • Volume
    • Congregation: Volume depends on genre (loud = acclamation; soft = litany)
    • Choral: when singing alone, follow score; when singing with congregation, adjust to assembly
    • Instrumental: when playing alone or accompanying choral ensemble, follow score; when playing to accompany congregation, adjust to leading instrument
slide29

Duration (meter / rhythm)

    • Congregation: most comfortable with regular meters and rhythms
    • Choral: when singing alone, may be adventurous; when supporting the congregation, use regular rhythms and meters
    • Instrumental: when playing alone or accompanying a vocal ensemble, may be adventurous; when supporting the congregation, use regular rhythms and meters
  • Timbre
    • Congregation: love the sound of untrained congregational unison
    • Choral: when singing along, timbre appropriate to the style of music being sung (chant, Bach chorale, shape-note hymn, spiritual); when singing with the congregation, assume refined congregational timbre
    • Instrumental: when playing alone or accompanying vocal ensemble, timbre appropriate to the style of music being played/sung; when accompanying the congregation, sustain singing
slide30

Scale/Melody/Harmony

    • Pentatonic
    • Diatonic (modal)
    • Chromatic (lightly)
    • Not dodecaphonic or micro-tonal
  • Texture
    • Monophonic
    • Heterophonic
    • Homophonic
    • Polyphonic
  • Form (congruent with ritual requirements)
    • Open forms (antiphon + psalm verses; mantra)
    • Closed forms (through-composed; hymns)
slide32

Music Alone

    • Bugler playing “Taps” at graveside
    • 3-part invention after psalm on Trinity Sunday
  • Music + Action
    • President Entering Room for a Press Conference
    • Wedding Procession
  • Music + Text
    • Edith Piaf in concert
    • Cantor offering Responsorial Psalm
  • Music + Text Accompanying an Action
    • “You put your right hand in….”
    • “Lamb of God” during Fraction Rite
mediates transcendence
Mediates Transcendence
  • Assists memorization of sacred texts
  • Facilitates group identity and action
  • Expresses and evokes emotion
  • Structures time and symbolizes eternity
  • Models ordered creativity