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Harlem Renaissance

Harlem Renaissance

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Harlem Renaissance

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  1. Harlem Renaissance • African American cultural movement in the 1920s and 1930s that celebrated black life and culture. • It’s connection to the European Renaissance was that both were periods of progressive change. There was an upsurge of culture, learning, entertainment and rediscovery of roots that showed itself in art, writing, literature, politics, technology and many other areas.

  2. James Langston HughesFebruary 1, 1902-May 22, 1967 • He was one of the most important writers and thinkers of the Harlem Renaissance. • He was influenced by his life in New York City's Harlem which was a primarily African American neighborhood. • It was through his poetry, novels, plays, essays, and children's books, that he promoted equality, condemned racism and injustice, and celebrated African American culture, humor, and spirituality. • His writing helped shape American literature and politics.

  3. Dreams By Langston Hughes Hold fast to dreams For if dreams die Life is a broken-winged bird That cannot fly. Hold fast to dreams For when dreams go Life is a barren field Frozen with snow.

  4. What is a metaphor? Where are the metaphors? What Hughes was trying to convey about dreams by using these metaphors? What kind of dream would a "broken-winged bird" represent? How about a "field frozen in snow"? Dreams By Langston Hughes Hold fast to dreams For if dreams die Life is a broken-winged bird That cannot fly. Hold fast to dreams For when dreams go Life is a barren field Frozen with snow.

  5. Brainstorm Metaphor – A figure of speech used to compare or contract two unlike things. Other metaphors for dreams that Hughes might have used Other metaphors for dreams that you hope will come true

  6. The Negro Speaks of Rivers By Langston Hughes I've known rivers: I've known rivers ancient as the world and older than the flow of human blood in human veins. My soul has grown deep like the rivers. I bathed in the Euphrates when dawns were young. I built my hut near the Congo and it lulled me to sleep. I looked upon the Nile and raised the pyramids above it. I heard the singing of the Mississippi when Abe Lincoln went down to New Orleans, and I've seen its muddy bosom turn all golden in the sunset. I've known rivers: Ancient, dusky rivers. My soul has grown deep like the rivers.