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Monday 4/14/14

Monday 4/14/14

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Monday 4/14/14

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  1. Monday 4/14/14 Please get out the following: Pen, pencil and highlighter Calendar Unit 5 CN (all CH. 13)

  2. Calendars: • Wed. April 30 – Friday May 2nd Mr. Wood will be team-teaching with me. • After May 2nd, I’m not accessible. • All grading policies procedures are the same. • All calendars, PPTs, docs will still be posted. • You will only have one more unit and the final museum project.

  3. (After the signing of treaties) (Before the war began) These don’t have to connect World War One Thesis/Claim/Argument: ______________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________

  4. WWI Causes & Effects: • Identify 4 Causes & 4 Effects in the 8 boxes you just created. Give a brief description in each box • Rank each cause & each effect 1 to 4 (4 being the strongest/most significant) • Write an argumentative Thesis Statement below the “cause and effect” chart about the cultural effects of the war (see next slide for question)

  5. Thesis Question: What do you think the overall feeling of the people of Europe was post-war and why? Resources for Causes: - Ch. 13.1 Cornell Notes or text - In class notes from Unit 5 Resources for Effects: - Ch. 13.3-13.4 Cornell Notes or text - In class notes from Unit 5

  6. Disillusionment: With your table partners create a definition based on your best guess. - loss of beliefs and faith, loss of illusions, false or misleading impression of reality.-

  7. Historical Quotes- A glimpse at changing philosophy (what you think) and ideology (what you believe) • Set up the back of your handout like this: Quote Philosophy Name • Cut out the quotes and the Philosophy names. • Place the quotes on the left side in any order. • Talk about the meaning of the quotes with your partners. • Discuss and place (DO NOT GLUE!) the philosophy names on the right side where you think they belong.

  8. Lost Generation Match Up… • I have put up the Philosophies and Ideologies on the board. • One Student Per Quote: Match the name of the philosophy or Ideology with the quote that represents it as best you can by placing the quotes and philosophies on each side of the chart – DO NOT GLUE! Sigmund Freud Charles Lindbergh

  9. Christianity—“Love God, your neighbors, your enemies, and yourself. Every individual has worth and at the same time each individual has a responsibility to the whole community. You should live your life according to moral rules.” Enlightenment—“Every person has the gift of reason and as science uncovers more and more knowledge about the physical world, reason and knowledge will bring about progress. Truths can be revealed through observation and uncovering of evidence.” Realism—“Art should capture a realistic portrait of the world. It should show everyday people and the world around us.” Newtonian Law—“The universe is governed by a specific set of laws. The universe was ordered by God the creator.” Existentialism—“Meaning has to be sought out, there is no universal meaning to life. We create our own meaning through life choices and our actions. While there is no moral certainty, we do have agency in that we can make choices.” Freudian thought—“Much of human behavior is irrational and beyond reason. We are driven by that part of the mind that is unconscious and our unconscious pursues actions determined by our desires.” Surrealism—“The realistic portrayal of life is not the purpose of art. Art should capture the inner world of emotion, feeling, and the workings of our imagination and unconscious mind.” Theory of Relativity—“Time and space are not constant, perception is relative to one’s experiences, there are no absolute truths.” Check your work…

  10. Now, GLUE!

  11. Tuesday 4/15/14 • Please get out the following: • Check out HOMEWORK! • Highlighter and pencil • Handout from yesterday • Unit 5 Cornell Notes (I will be collecting one set)

  12. Calendars: • Wed. April 30 – Friday May 2ndMr. Wood will be team-teaching with me. • After May 2nd, I’m not accessible. • All grading policies procedures are the same. • All calendars, PPTs, docs will still be posted. • You will only have one more unit and the final museum project.

  13. Create a new T Chart on the back of the in class notes handout. • Which of these philosophies happened before WWI? Which After? Set up the blank side like this and write the philosophy name on the correct side: Before WWI After WWI Answer these questions under the T Chart: • What do the philosophies on the left have in common? The right? • Do you see a connection between the two sets? Explain.

  14. Christianity—“Love God, your neighbors, your enemies, and yourself. Every individual has worth and at the same time each individual has a responsibility to the whole community. You should live your life according to moral rules.” Enlightenment—“Every person has the gift of reason and as science uncovers more and more knowledge about the physical world, reason and knowledge will bring about progress. Truths can be revealed through observation and uncovering of evidence.” Realism—“Art should capture a realistic portrait of the world. It should show everyday people and the world around us.” Newtonian Law—“The universe is governed by a specific set of laws. The universe was ordered by God the creator.” Existentialism—“Meaning has to be sought out, there is no universal meaning to life. We create our own meaning through life choices and our actions. While there is no moral certainty, we do have agency in that we can make choices.” Freudian thought—“Much of human behavior is irrational and beyond reason. We are driven by that part of the mind that is unconscious and our unconscious pursues actions determined by our desires.” Surrealism—“The realistic portrayal of life is not the purpose of art. Art should capture the inner world of emotion, feeling, and the workings of our imagination and unconscious mind.” Theory of Relativity—“Time and space are not constant, perception is relative to one’s experiences, there are no absolute truths.” Check your work… After Before

  15. A Lost Generation? Standard 10.6.3 Understand the widespread disillusionment with prewar institutions, authorities, and values that resulted in a void that was later filled by totalitarians. Standard 10.6.4 Discuss the influence of World War I on literature, art, and intellectual life in the West (e.g., Pablo Picasso, the "lost generation" of Gertrude Stein, Ernest Hemingway).

  16. What was the Lost Generation? The lost generation was a term coined by Gertrude Stein to describe young American artists (mostly writers) who rejected American ideals in the 1920s and moved to Paris to live the bohemian lifestyle (party it up, live for today, because there may be no tomorrow). Famous members of the Lost Generation included Stein herself, Ernest Hemingway, Ezra Pound, and F. Scott Fitzgerald.

  17. The Lost Generation thought that Western Civilization was coming to an End… • Why would intellectuals have thought WWI was the end of the superiority of Western Civilization? 1918

  18. The Lost Generation felt betrayed by their leaders, their culture, and their institutions. • They asked themselves “How could all this death and destruction have been allowed to happen?” They felt helpless, and lost. They despaired for the future. Where once they had trusted, now they did not. It appeared that Good had lost the battle against Evil.

  19. Writers tried to capture the bleak hopelessness of War • T.S. Eliot- The Waste Land (1922) • JRR Tolkien- The Lord Of The Rings (1937-1954) • F. Scott Fitzgerald- The Great Gatsby (1925) • Ernest Hemingway- • An American novelist • Served in WWI • A Farewell to Arms (1929) • "I know the night is not the same as the day: that all things are different, that the things of the night cannot be explained in the day, because they do not then exist, and the night can be a dreadful time for lonely people once their loneliness has started." See Also: Literature in the 1920’s, Pg. 464

  20. Modern Art- Artists tried to capture new perceptions of reality… “Oppy Wood” – John Nash, 1917 “Gassed and Wounded”Eric Kennington, 1918 • Old styles of art couldn’t express the deep distress caused by WWI. • In many cases, people did not want to remember the war too clearly or too exactly. • WWI changed the way people perceived the world and this was reflected in their art. “Those Who Have Lost Their Names”Albin Eggar-Linz, 1914

  21. Cubism- Reality broken into Pieces • Cubism was born out of the experience of the WWI battlefield. • At night, exploding bombs lit the sky in quick flashes, causing the world to look disjointed, distorted, disordered, and broken up into stark pieces. • In Cubism… • Objects are broken up and re-assembled in abstract form. • Picasso • Pre-WWI work • African masks See also: Revolution in the Arts, Pg. 465

  22. What do you see? • Pablo Picasso, Three Musicians, 1921

  23. What do you see? • Pablo Picasso, Still Life, 1924

  24. Surrealism- Trying to show how things Feel • During WWI, the founder of surrealism, André Breton, who had trained in medicine and psychiatry, served in a neurological hospital where he used the psychoanalytic methods of Sigmund Freud with soldiers who were shell-shocked. • He sought a way to express the inner workings of the mind, those feelings, experiences, urges and impressions that were separated from logic and reason. • Surrealism is an art movement that sought to link the world of dreams with real life. Surreal—beyond or above reality • Yves Tanguy, Indefinite Divisibility 1942

  25. How is this painting connected to the idea of Perception? • Salvador Dali, The Persistence of Memory, 1931

  26. What do you see? • Salvador Dali, The Temptation of St Anthony • What does this painting tell you about how the artist is feeling?

  27. Block 4/16-17/14 • Please get out the following: • Lost Generation Notes • Post-WWI bubble notes • Pencil and highlighter • 2 sheets of binder paper • Text Book

  28. Music- Ragtime, Jazz and Swing • Musical artists in the US combined African rhythms from the South with popular music to make ragtime, jazz and swing. • This music held a hesitation before the last beat of four. That hesitation expressed the uncertainty and anguish of the post war world. • The hesitation is what makes this music sound different from classical music. • The best musicians like Woody Herman, Duke Ellington and Fats Waller were masters at manipulating this hesitation in the music. • Swing dances like Lindy-hop, Balboa and Shag were created to take advantage of the new music. These dances also broke taboos. Check out videos

  29. Psychology and Sigmund Freud -Trying to find out how the brain works • Sigmund Freud —physician- He opened a window on the unconscious — where, he said, lust, rage and repression battle for supremacy — and changed the way we view ourselves- TIME Magazine • Believed that human behavior is irrational • Believed humans are driven by their unconscious mind • Believed dreams could help people understand their unconscious • Freud greatly influenced the surrealists See also: Influence of Freudian Psychology, Pg. 463

  30. Science and the Theory of Relativity - Trying to find out how the physical world really works • Albert Einstein (1879-1955) • German-born physicist- a true out of the box thinker - the genius among geniuses who discovered, merely by thinking about it, that the universe was not as it seemed. –TIME Magazine • Discovered that space and time are not constant • Known for seeing things from an entirely new angle, and then devising simple experiments to prove his ideas. • Theory of Relativity changed how people viewed the world • Werner Heisenberg—Uncertainty Principle (1927) • The more precisely the position is determined, the less precisely the momentum is known in this instant, and vice versa. • Believed we could know what we couldn’t know See also: Impact of Einstein’s Theory of Relativity, pg. 463

  31. Philosophy and Existentialism- Trying to decide what we should think about next… • John Paul Sartre, Albert Camus- • Existentialism- Humans must define their own Reality • There is no universal meaning to life. There is no one way to order or explain the universe • We must create our own meaning • We can never truly understand each other, because we are all too different. No two understandings are the same. See also: Thinkers React to Uncertainties, Pg. 464

  32. Existentialism in the movies…. WOODY ALLEN:  That's quite a lovely Jackson Pollock, isn't it? GIRL IN MUSEUM:  Yes it is. WOODY ALLEN:  What does it say to you? GIRL IN MUSEUM:  It restates the negativeness of the universe, the hideous lonely emptiness of existence, nothingness, the predicament of man forced to live in a barren, godless eternity, like a tiny flame flickering in an immense void, with nothing but waste, horror, and degradation, forming a useless bleak straightjacket in a black absurd cosmos. [pause] WOODY ALLEN:  What are you doing Saturday night? GIRL IN MUSEUM:  Committing suicide. WOODY ALLEN:  What about Friday night? GIRL IN MUSEUM: [leaves silently] "Play It Again, Sam", Paramount Pictures, 1972

  33. Talk with your table partners and create a collaborative summary at the bottom of your notes.

  34. 1. Use your ch. 15.1 Cornell Notes and in class notes to help you fill out only the left column. 2. The circles should be detailed, not just labeled. 3. Be prepared to share under doc camera in 4 minutes