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UNIT 6 Chapter 24 – WWII: The Road to War Chapter 25 – WWII: The Americans at war. WORLD WAR II. Presidents of the United States. #21 - … Chester A. Arthur; Republican (1881) Grover Cleveland; Democrat (1884) Benjamin Harrison; Republican (1888) Grover Cleveland; Democrat (1892)

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unit 6 chapter 24 wwii the road to war chapter 25 wwii the americans at war

UNIT 6Chapter 24 – WWII: The Road to WarChapter 25 – WWII: The Americans at war

WORLD WAR II

presidents of the united states
Presidents of the United States
  • #21 - …
    • Chester A. Arthur; Republican (1881)
  • Grover Cleveland; Democrat (1884)
  • Benjamin Harrison; Republican (1888)
  • Grover Cleveland; Democrat (1892)
  • William McKinley; Republican (1896)
  • Theodore Roosevelt; Republican (1901)
  • William Howard Taft; Republican (1908)
  • Woodrow Wilson; Democrat (1912)
  • Warren G. Harding; Republican (1920)
  • Calvin Coolidge; Republican (1923)
  • Herbert Hoover; Republican (1928)
  • Franklin D. Roosevelt; Democrat (1932)
  • Harry S. Truman;
  • George Washington; Federalist (1788)
  • John Adams; Federalist (1796)
  • Thomas Jefferson (1800)
  • James Madison (1808)
  • James Monroe (1816)
  • John Quincy Adams (1824)
  • Andrew Jackson; Democrat (1828)
  • Martin Van Buren; Democrat (1836)
  • William Henry Harrison; Whig (1840)
  • John Tyler; Whig (1841)
  • James K. Polk; Democrat (1844)
  • Zachary Taylor; Whig (1848)
  • Millard Fillmore; Whig (1850)
  • Franklin Pierce; Democrat (1852)
  • James Buchanan; Democrat (1856)
  • Abraham Lincoln; Republican (1860)
  • Andrew Johnson; Democrat (1865)
  • Ulysses S. Grant; Republican (1868)
  • Rutherford B. Hayes; Republican (1876)
  • James Garfield; Republican (1880)
slide3

America: Pathways to the Present

Chapter 25: World War II: Americans at War (1941–1945)

Section 1: Mobilization

Section 2: Retaking Europe

Section 3: The Holocaust

Section 4: The War in the Pacific

Section 5: The Social Impact of the War

objectives
OBJECTIVES
  • CORE OBJECTIVE: Analyze the causes & consequences of World War II and the impact the war had on American society.
    • Objective 6.4:How did the Roosevelt mobilize troops and prepare the economy for war?
    • Objective 6.5:Describe the causes and effects of the Holocaust.
    • Objective 6.6:How did the allies turn the tide of war in retaking Europe and the Pacific?
    • Objective 6.7:How did the war change social conditions for women and minorities?
the japanese advance 1941 1942

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The Japanese Advance, 1941–1942
  • By March 1942, Japanhad swept aside British, American, and Dutch naval power in Southeast Asia and brought a wide band of colonies into the Japanese empire.
  • On May 6, 1942, the Philippines fell to Japanese forces.
    • The Japanese then captured some 76,000 Filipinos and Americans.
    • They were taken on a brutal 6- to 12-day journey that became known as the Bataan Death March, in which they were denied water and rest.
    • Those who became too weak were executed.
    • At least 10,000 prisoners died.
    • Those who survived were sent to primitive prison camps where 15,000 or more died.
  • The brutality of the Japanese soldiers defied accepted international standards for humane treatment of prisoners spelled out in 1929 at the third Geneva Convention.
battles in the pacific

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BATTLES IN THE PACIFIC
  • Battle of the Coral Sea
    • In May 1942, Japanese and American naval forces engaged in the Battle of the Coral Sea.
    • This battle caused enormous damage on both sides.
    • In the end, it was a draw, but it prevented the Japanese from invading Australia.
  • Battle of Midway
    • On June 4, 1942, the Japanese hoped to destroy the United States Pacific Fleet by luring them into a battle near Midway Island.
    • The Americans, who appeared to be losing at first, surprised the Japanese as they were refueling planes.
    • The Americans sank four Japanese carriers& destroyed 250 planes
    • They were unable to launch any more offensive operations in the Pacific.
  • This victory for the Allies turned the tide of war & allowed them to take the offensive in the Pacific.
the battle of guadal canal

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The Battle of Guadal Canal
  • A major goal for the Allies was to capture Guadalcanal in the Solomon Islands, where the Japanese were building an airfield.
    • When more than 11,000 marines landed on the island in August 1942, the Japanese soldiers fled into the jungle.
  • The Battle of Guadalcanal provided the marines with their first taste of jungle warfare.
    • After five months, the Japanese were finally defeated.
  • From Guadalcanal, U.S. forces beganisland-hopping, a military strategy of selectively attacking specific enemy-held islands and bypassing others.
    • This strategy allowed the Americans to move more quickly toward their ultimate goal—Japan itself.
the battle of leyte gulf

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THE BATTLE OF LEYTE GULF
  • In October 1944, American troops invaded the Philippine island of Leyte.
    • As the ground troops battled inland, the greatest naval battle in world history developed off the coast.
    • More than 280 warships took part in the three-day Battle of Leyte Gulf.
  • The Battle of Leyte Gulf was the first battle in which Japanese pilots loaded their aircraft with bombs and then deliberately crashed them into enemy ships.
    • These were called kamikazes, or suicide planes.
    • Despite this tactic, the American force virtually destroyed the Japanese navy and emerged victorious.
  • Japanese land forces in the Philippines continued to resist, however.
    • It took two months for the American troops to liberate Leyte.
    • The battle for the Philippines’ capital, Manila, was equally difficult, leaving some 100,000 Filipino civilians dead.
    • Not until June 1945 did the Allies control the Philippines.
the manhattan project

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The Manhattan Project
  • Roosevelt organized the top-secret Manhattan Project to develop the atomic bomb before the Germans.
    • On July 16, 1945, Manhattan Project scientists field-tested the world’s first atomic bomb in the desert of New Mexico.
    • With a blinding flash of light, the explosion blew a huge crater in the earth and shattered windows some 125 miles away.
  • President Harry S Truman, who took office after Roosevelt’s sudden death, made the ultimate decision to drop the atomic bomb on Japan.
    • On August 6, 1945, the plane Enola Gay, dropped a single atomic bomb on the Japanese city of Hiroshima.
    • A blast of intense heat annihilated the city’s center and its residents in an instant—leading to as many as 80,000 deaths.
    • Three days later, a second bomb was dropped on Nagasaki.
  • On August 14, the government of Japan surrendered.
    • On September 2, 1945, the formal surrender agreement was signed.
    • The long and destructive war had finally come to an end.
franklin roosevelt
Franklin Roosevelt
  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3tyvvjWtc-Y
the war in the pacific assessment
The War in the Pacific—Assessment

Which of the following was the greatest naval battle in world history?

(A) The Battle of Leyte Gulf

(B) The Battle of Iwo Jima

(C) The Battle of Okinawa

(D) The Battle of Midway

The purpose of the Manhattan Project was to develop __________.

(A) the atomic bomb before the Germans did

(B) a defense against kamikaze attacks

(C) an unsinkable warship

(D) a new military training program

the war in the pacific assessment1
The War in the Pacific—Assessment

Which of the following was the greatest naval battle in world history?

(A) The Battle of Leyte Gulf

(B) The Battle of Iwo Jima

(C) The Battle of Okinawa

(D) The Battle of Midway

The purpose of the Manhattan Project was to develop __________.

(A) the atomic bomb before the Germans did

(B) a defense against kamikaze attacks

(C) an unsinkable warship

(D) a new military training program