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Learning Targets

Learning Targets

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Learning Targets

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  1. Kentucky’s Professional Growth and Effectiveness System and Framework for TeachingKACTE Spring 2014

  2. Learning Targets • I can explain the structure of the Framework for Teaching. • I can identify and explain specific domains within the Framework for Teaching. • I can understand the progression of the four performance levels and critical attributes of each.

  3. Proposed Multiple Measures Teacher Professional Growth and Effectiveness System Observation StudentVoice PeerObservation SelfReflection ProfessionalGrowth All measures are supported through evidence. Student Growth

  4. Student Growth Quantitative measure of the impact a teacher or principal has on a student (or set of students) as measured by student growth goal setting and student growth percentiles. Student Voice Student feedback around teacher performance based on survey data Explanation of Multiple Measures Professional Growth Increased effectiveness resulting from experiences that develop an educator’s skills, knowledge, expertise and other characteristics Critical self-examination of practice on a regular basis to deepen knowledge, expand repertoire of skills and incorporate findings to improve practice Self Reflection Process of a peer observing another’s professional practice and observable behaviors, providing supportive and constructive feedback for formative purposes Peer Observation Evaluator’s observation, documentation and feedback on a teacher’s professional practices and observable behaviors Observation SUPPORTED BY Documents or demonstrations that indicates proof of a particular descriptor. Should be a natural by-product created through the process of teaching Evidence

  5. KENTUCKY’S FRAMEWORK FOR TEACHING

  6. Background and Recent Enhancement • Originally published in 1996 • As a result of the Measures of Effective Teaching (MET) Study, changes include: 1) Less detail in component level to make observations easier 2) Critical Attributes provide guidance to determine performance levels 3) Examples illustrate rubric language

  7. Teaching is complex… “Teaching is a profession more complex than medicine.” Lee Shulman, “The Wisdom of Practice”

  8. What is good teaching?

  9. The Wisdom of Practice If you were to walk into a classroom, what might you see or hear (from the students as well as the teacher) that would cause you to think that you were in the presence of an expert?

  10. 2. Activity: Self-Reflection • As a teacher, I have had mostly positive experiences with classroom observation. • There are multiple definitions of “good teaching.” • Most colleagues in my school have shared values and assumptions about what good teaching looks like. • It is important to observe all teachers—no matter what subject or grade level—against the same definition of good teaching.

  11. The Domains 1: Planning and Preparation 2: The Classroom Environment 3: Instruction 4: Professional Responsibilities

  12. Domain 1: Planning and Preparation • Demonstrating Knowledge of Content and Pedagogy • Demonstrating Knowledge of Students • Setting Instructional Outcomes • Demonstrating Knowledge of Resources • Designing Coherent Instruction • Designing Student Assessments Domain 2: The Classroom Environment • Creating an Environment of Respect and Rapport • Establishing a Culture for Learning • Managing Classroom Procedures • Managing Student Behavior • Organizing Physical Space Domain 4: Professional Responsibilities • Reflecting on Teaching • Maintaining Accurate Records • Communicating with Families • Participating in a Professional Community • Growing and Developing Professionally • Showing Professionalism Domain 3: Instruction • Communicating with Students • Using Questioning and Discussion Techniques • Engaging Students in Learning • Using Assessment in Instruction • Demonstrating Flexibility and Responsiveness Framework for Teaching

  13. Domain 1: Planning and Preparation • Demonstrating Knowledge of Content and Pedagogy • Demonstrating Knowledge of Students • Setting Instructional Outcomes • Demonstrating Knowledge of Resources • Designing Coherent Instruction • Designing Student Assessments Domain 2: The Classroom Environment • Creating an Environment of Respect and Rapport • Establishing a Culture for Learning • Managing Classroom Procedures • Managing Student Behavior • Organizing Physical Space Domain 4: Professional Responsibilities • Reflecting on Teaching • Maintaining Accurate Records • Communicating with Families • Participating in a Professional Community • Growing and Developing Professionally • Showing Professionalism Domain 3: Instruction • Communicating with Students • Using Questioning and Discussion Techniques • Engaging Students in Learning • Using Assessment in Instruction • Demonstrating Flexibility and Responsiveness Framework for Teaching

  14. Common Language

  15. JIGSAW OF THE DOMAINS Assign each table a domain to review Use questions to review Share out

  16. DOMAIN DISCUSSION • Why is this domain important? • How is evidence for this domain documented? • How might lack of skill in this domain affect the other domains? • Which component/s in this domain might beginning teachers find particularly difficult? Workbook page 5

  17. Domain 1 – Planning and Preparation 1a Demonstrating Knowledge of Content/Pedagogy 1b Demonstrating Knowledge of Students 1c Setting Instructional Outcomes 1d Demonstrating Knowledge of Resources 1e Designing Coherent Instruction 1f Designing Student Assessment Workbook page 7

  18. Domain 1: Planning and Preparation Knowing Components Doing Components 1c: Setting Instructional Outcomes 1f: Designing Student Assessments 1e: Designing Coherent Instruction • 1a: Demonstrating Knowledge of Content and Pedagogy • 1b: Demonstrating Knowledge of Students • 1d: Demonstrating Knowledge of Resources

  19. Using the “Doing” Components Understanding by Design Grant Wiggins and Jay McTighe, 1998

  20. Backward DesignBegin with the end in mind What is it that we want our students to know and be able to do? 1c. Selecting instructional outcomes

  21. Backward DesignBegin with the end in mind How will I know when they know it? 1f. Designing student assessment

  22. Backward DesignBegin with the end in mind What activities and assignments will lead them to acquire these skills? 1e. Designing coherent instruction

  23. How is evidence for Domain 1 documented? ie: How can you demonstrate your ability to plan and prepare?

  24. Domain 2 – The Classroom Environment 2a: Creating an Environment of Respect and Rapport 2b: Establishing a Culture for Learning 2c: Managing Classroom Procedures 2d: Managing Student Behavior 2e: Organizing Physical Space

  25. 2b: A Culture for Learning Indicators include: Belief in the value of the work Expectationsare high and supported through both verbal and nonverbal behaviors Qualityis expected and recognized Effort and persistence are expected and recognized Confidencein ability is evidenced by teacher and students language and behaviors Expectation for all students to participate

  26. How might lack of skill in Domain 2 affect the other domains?

  27. Domain 3 – Instruction 3a: Communicating with Students 3b: Questioning and Discussion 3c: Engaging Students in Learning 3d: Using Assessment in Instruction 3e: Flexibility and Responsiveness

  28. 3c – Engaging Students in LearningIntellectual InvolvementActive Construction of Understanding “Minds on”

  29. 3c – Engaging Students in Learning Activities and Assignments Grouping of Students Instructional Materials and Resources Structure and Pacing Relevant to Students Require Student Thinking

  30. Which components in Domain 3 might teachers find particularly difficult?

  31. Domain 4 – Professional Responsibility 4a Reflecting on Teaching 4b Maintaining Accurate Records 4c Communicating with Families 4d Participation in a Professional Community 4e Growing and Developing Professionally 4f Showing Professionalism

  32. 4a: Reflecting on Teaching • Accuracy • Use in future teaching

  33. Why is Domain 4 important?

  34. PERFORMANCE LEVELS Read the levels of performance for component 2a Review these levels and highlight or underline words or phrases that differentiate each level

  35. 4. Activity: Understanding the Levels of Performance Classroom interactions among the teacher and individual students are highly respectful, reflecting genuine warmth and caring and sensitivity to students as individuals. Students exhibit respect for the teacher and contribute to high levels of civility among all members of the class. The net result of interactions is that of connections with students as individuals. Level 4 Teacher-student interactions are friendly and demonstrate general caring and respect. Such interactions are appropriate to the ages of the students. Students exhibit respect for the teacher. Interactions among students are generally polite and respectful. The teacher responds successfully to disrespectful behavior among students. The net result of the interactions is polite and respectful, but business-like. Level 3 Patterns of classroom interactions, both between the teacher and students and among students, are generally appropriate but may reflect occasional inconsistencies, favoritism, and disregard for students’ ages, cultures, and developmental levels. Students rarely demonstrate disrespect for one another. The teacher attempts to respond to disrespectful behavior, with uneven results. The net result of the interactions is neutral: conveying neither warmth nor conflict. Level 2 Patterns of classroom interactions, both between the teacher and students and among students, are mostly negative, inappropriate, or insensitive to students’ ages, cultural backgrounds, and developmental levels. Interactions are characterized by sarcasm, put-downs, or conflict. The teacher does not deal with disrespectful behavior. Level 1

  36. 4. Activity: Understanding the Levels of Performance Classroom interactions among the teacher and individual students are highly respectful, reflecting genuine warmth and caring and sensitivity to students as individuals. Students exhibit respect for the teacher and contribute to high levels of civility among all members of the class. The net result of interactions is that of connections with students as individuals. Level 4 Teacher-student interactions are friendly and demonstrate general caring and respect. Such interactions are appropriate to the ages of the students. Students exhibit respect for the teacher. Interactions among students are generally polite and respectful. The teacher responds successfully to disrespectful behavior among students. The net result of the interactions is polite and respectful, but business-like. Level 3 Patterns of classroom interactions, both between the teacher and students and among students, are generally appropriate but may reflect occasional inconsistencies, favoritism, and disregard for students’ ages, cultures, and developmental levels. Students rarely demonstrate disrespect for one another. The teacher attempts to respond to disrespectful behavior, with uneven results. The net result of the interactions is neutral: conveying neither warmth nor conflict. Level 2 Patterns of classroom interactions, both between the teacher and students and among students, are mostly negative, inappropriate, or insensitive to students’ ages, cultural backgrounds, and developmental levels. Interactions are characterized by sarcasm, put-downs, or conflict. The teacher does not deal with disrespectful behavior. Level 1

  37. Performance Levels: Key Words

  38. Performance Levels: Key Words Levels of cognition and constructivist learning increase

  39. Performance Levels: Key Words Levels of cognition and constructivist learning increase

  40. Performance Levels: Key Words Teacher-directed success! Student-directed success! Levels of cognition and constructivist learning increase

  41. 6. Activity: Sorting Evidence and Interpretation Clear expectations of student conduct are displayed around the room and are referenced by the teacher at various points during the lesson. The teacher was friendly and very eager to get to the afternoon lesson. The teacher continues instruction while a student enters the room, walks to his seat, and begins work promptly without interrupting the teacher or other students. The students were engaged in the small-group activity. The teacher asks a student about how her audition for a play went and asks another student how his mother is feeling. During small-group work, one student says to another, “Let her talk.” Everyone seemed happy to be in the room and eager to learn.

  42. Activity 6 Read the observation notes. Underline statements you think are evidence. Clear Expectations of student conduct are displayed around the room and are referenced by the teacher at various points during the lesson. The teacher was friendly and very eager to get the afternoon lesson. The teacher continues instruction while a student enters the room, walks to his seat, and begins work promptly without interrupting the teacher or other students. The students were engaged in the small group activity. The teacher asks a student about how her audition for a play went and asks another student how his mother is feeling. During small-group work, one student says to another. “Let her talk.” Everyone seemed happy to be in the room and eager to learn.

  43. 6. Activity: Sorting Evidence and Interpretation Clear expectations of student conduct are displayed around the room and are referenced by the teacher at various points during the lesson. The teacher was friendly and very eager to get to the afternoon lesson. The teacher continues instruction while a student enters the room, walks to his seat, and begins work promptly without interrupting the teacher or other students. The students were engaged in the small-group activity. The teacher asks a student about how her audition for a play went and asks another student how his mother is feeling. During small-group work, one student says to another, “Let her talk.” Everyone seemed happy to be in the room and eager to learn.

  44. 7. Activity: Determining the Component Clear expectations of student conduct are displayed around the room and are referenced by the teacher at various points during the lesson. The teacher was friendly and very eager to get to the afternoon lesson. The teacher continues instruction while a student enters the room, walks to his seat, and begins work promptly without interrupting the teacher or other students. The students were engaged in the small-group activity. The teacher asks a student about how her audition for a play went and asks another student how his mother is feeling. During small-group work, one student says to another, “Let her talk.” Everyone seemed happy to be in the room and eager to learn. 2a: Creating an Environment of Respect and Rapport 2b: Establishing a Culture for Learning 2c: Managing Classroom Procedures 2d: Managing Student Behavior

  45. 7. Activity: Determining the Component 2a: Creating an Environment of Respect and Rapport The teacher asks a student about how her audition for a play went and asks another student how his mother is feeling. 2b: Establishing a Culture for Learning During small-group work, one student says to another, “Let her talk.” 2c: Managing Classroom Procedures The teacher continues instruction while a student enters the room, walks to his seat, and begins work promptly without interrupting the teacher or other students. 2d: Managing Student Behavior Clear expectations of student conduct are displayed around the room and are referenced by the teacher at various points during the lesson.

  46. Aligning Teacher Practice with the Kentucky Framework for Teaching • Locate the handout you downloaded prior to beginning this presentation. It is titled Aligning Teacher Practice with the Kentucky Framework for Teaching. • Read each statement carefully and make an initial judgment as to with which domain it best belongs. Review that Domain, and others, to make a final decision. Record the Domain number in the appropriate blank on the handout. • Next, review each component within the Domain you chose and decide which one best matches the classroom scenario or teacher behavior. • Record the Component number in the appropriate blank on the handout.

  47. 1. Students in Mr. M’s chemistry class are given back a lab report that they had completed earlier in the week. Each report has a letter grade at the top, but no other information. Domain: 3 - Instruction Component: D – Using Assessment in Instruction