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International Organizations

International Organizations

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International Organizations

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  1. International Organizations Exploring

  2. I See/Hear, I Think, I Wonder • Watch the video. • What do you see/hear? Do not make inferences, just tell what you see. • What does that make you think about? Make an inference about what you see. • What does it make you wonder? What questions do you have about what you see?

  3. I See, I Think, I Wonder • Look at the painting. • What do you see/hear? Do not make inferences, just tell what you see. • What does that make you think about? Make an inference about what you see. • What does it make you wonder? What questions do you have about what you see? What title would you give this painting? The Librarian 1566 by Giuseppe Arcimboldo

  4. Spring byGiuseppe Arcimboldo 1573 The Water, The Water 1563 SAILSS: Supporting Arts Integrated Learning for Student Success Bates M.S./pklos

  5. Guidelines for Tableaux • All actors are still —the tableau catches a frozen moment in time. • Each Actor has a strong point of concentration. • Each character and/or object shows an emotion or feeling that fits the moment we are portraying. • The tableau reflects the information in the text accurately. • The tableau uses different physical levels (low, middle, high). • The tableau has a title. Make sure you include everyone in your group! They can be objects, part of the setting or supporting characters. Objects have to reflect feeling of the moment, too!

  6. Tableau: Frozen Picture Tableaux are silent groups of people in frozen action: students use bodies to crystallize a key moment or to represent an idea. • As a group, you must cooperatively discuss, negotiate and decide upon the image you will communicate or represent. • Using body language , you create an image, a canvas, or “human statue” that communicates an idea or a single moment of action from a story or an event. • Tableaus are shared in complete stillness and silence. • Your expressive faces and body positions suggest what the characters are doing, how they are interacting with other characters and how they are feeling about the situation. The audience should be able to tell if the character is sad, happy, depressed or any other emotion from the tableau.

  7. Considerations for a GOOD Tableau Think of the space you will construct your tableau in as your “canvas”—just as an artist does. You will want to fill up the space! • LEVEL: Make your poses multi-leveled. Try to incorporate high (standing, reaching tall), medium and low (crouch, on ground) levels. Remember to fill your canvas horizontally as well as vertically. • BALANCE: Consider the relationship of your pose to others to make it balanced in your space. • FOCAL POINT: What is the scene’s focus of attention? Use eye contact wisely.

  8. Let’s Practice! Everyone stand up! Make sure you have an arms length space all the way around your body. Everyone, independently, strike a frozen pose for the following scenes (remember—no talking) Start at a neutral position! Hold your action pose for 10 seconds. Can you be our best actor? Hitting a home run Arguing with your sister Being surprised by a loud noise Trying to open a cap of a jar that is stuck Now you have the idea! 8

  9. Texture The element of art that refers to how things feel, or look as if they might feel if touched. Texture is perceived by touch and sight; objects can have rough or smooth textures and matt or shiny surfaces • Tactile texture is REAL or ACTUAL texture and is the way a surface would feel if you could touch it. • Visual texture is sometimes called SIMULATEDor IMPLIED texture. It is the way a surface appears through the sense of vision. Maskette(lukwakongo) Lega peoples Democratic Republic of the Congo Late 19th-early 20th century Wood, plant fiber, pigment John James AudubonArtic Hare, c 1841 Osprey and Weakfish, 1829 National Gallery of Art SAILSS/Supporting Arts Integrated Learning for Student Success Wiley H. Bates M.S. C. Caple and P. Klos

  10. Meret Oppenheim, Fur covered cup, saucer, and spoon, 1936 (a.k.a. The Object) SAILSS/Supporting Arts Integrated Learning for Student Success Wiley H. Bates M.S. C. Caple and P. Klos

  11. Martin Johnson Heade (painter)American, 1819 - 1904Giant Magnolias on a Blue Velvet Cloth, c. 1890oil on canvas National Gallery of Art SAILSS/Supporting Arts Integrated Learning for Student Success Wiley H. Bates M.S. C. Caple and P. Klos