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Welcome. Hospitality Supervision CHRM 2470. Agenda. Ground Rules Information Card Warm Up Activity Syllabus Review Chapter 1: Restaurant and Foodservice Operations are Labor-Intensive. Ground Rules. Be on time – start on time

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welcome

Welcome

Hospitality Supervision

CHRM 2470

agenda
Agenda
  • Ground Rules
  • Information Card
  • Warm Up Activity
  • Syllabus Review
  • Chapter 1: Restaurant and Foodservice Operations are Labor-Intensive
ground rules
Ground Rules
  • Be on time – start on time
  • All cell phones at mute/turned off during class, if it rings………..I will answer !
  • No Internet use during class, unless part of classroom activity
  • Appreciate other points of view
  • Respect others’ desire to learn
  • End on time
information card
Information Card
  • Please fill out the following information on the index card
    • Side ONE
      • Name
      • Phone
      • Email Address
    • Side TWO
      • Business affiliation & current position
      • Hospitality industry background
warm up activity
Warm Up Activity
  • Break into pairs, someone you do not know
  • Interview each other for introductions
  • Please share with the class the following:
    • Name
    • Program of study
    • Life beyond school (work, family, etc.)
    • Tell the class about the best supervisor you ever had (characteristics/skills)
slide7
&
  • The Institute for the Culinary Arts is “teaming up” with the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation (NRAEF) to provide a double benefit for our students.
  • By using the Competency Guide offered by the NRAEF, and using the Certification exam as the final exam for this course, the student benefits twice!
  • If you complete the Certification Exam with a score of 75% or higher, and complete the requirements of this course, you will receive college credit for the course and certification in Hospitality Human Resources Management and Supervision through the NRAEF ManageFirst Program.
  • The next couple of slides tell some of the benefits of the ManagaFirst Program.
slide8

NRAEF ManageFirst Program Competency GuideIS REQUIRED FOR THIS COURSE

How can this book help me?

  • Part of a certificate program
  • Industry-driven
  • Resume builder

Metropolitan Community College

slide9

NRAEF ManageFirst Program Competency GuideIS REQUIRED FOR THIS COURSE

Who is the NRAEF?

  • Educational arm of the National Restaurant Association
  • Bridge between academia and industry
  • Work with over 60,000 restaurant, hospitality and foodservice members companies

Metropolitan Community College

slide10

NRAEF ManageFirst Program Competency GuideIS REQUIRED FOR THIS COURSE

Competency Guide Content

  • Management-focused
  • Application-based, not just theory
  • Professional Profiles give you a “sneak peek” into the field
  • “Real world” activities help build job skills

Metropolitan Community College

slide11

NRAEF ManageFirst Program Competency GuideIS REQUIRED FOR THIS COURSE

How will this certificate help me?

  • Validated by over 200 restaurant, foodservice and hospitality organizations
  • Resume builder
  • Tangible accomplishment
  • Can give you a hiring advantage over peers who didn’t use ManageFirst

Metropolitan Community College

slide12

ManageFirst ProfessionalTM (MFP®) Credential

  • The MFP credential recognizes students as having the academic and practical knowledge they need to succeed in the restaurant, foodservice, and hospitality industry.
  • To earn the MFP credential, students must:
    • Pass four Core Credential exams and one Foundation/Elective exam
    • Provide documentation for 800 hours of industry work experience
slide13

ManageFirst Professional (MFP)

  • MCC offers classes that support the following courses:
  • NRAEF ManageFirst Core Credential Topics
  • CHRM 2475 Leadership – Hospitality and Restaurant Management
  • CHRM 2460 Cost Management – Controlling Foodservice Costs
  • CHRM 2470 Supervision – Hospitality Human Resources Management & Supervision
  • CHRM 1020 Sanitation – ServSafe® Food Safety
  • NRAEF ManageFirst Foundation Topics
  • CHRM 2480 Purchasing – Purchasing
  • CHRM 2465 Foodservice Financial Management – Hospitality Accounting
  • CHRM 2350 Nutrition – Nutrition
additional info commercial
Additional Info - COMMERCIAL
  • Inclement Weather Policy
  • 2013 ICA High School Culinary Invitational

Calling all Volunteers!!

let s take a break
Let’s Take a Break

Please be back in 15 minutes

OH 1-15

restaurant and foodservice operations are labor intensive
Restaurant and Foodservice Operations Are Labor-Intensive
  • Hospitality Human Resources Management and Supervision

1

OH 1-16

chapter learning objectives after completing this chapter you should be able to
Chapter Learning ObjectivesAfter completing this chapter, you should be able to:
  • Explain management activities and how evolving employee expectations can influence managers as they facilitate the work of their employees.
  • Describe strategies for facilitating the work of employees.
  • Explain how skills, abilities, leadership style, and corporate culture impact a manager’s human resources activities.
  • Identify the benefits of and procedures for promoting employee diversity within restaurant and foodservice operations.
chapter learning objectives continued after completing this chapter you should be able to
Chapter Learning Objectives continued:After completing this chapter, you should be able to:
  • Define diversity and identify benefits of a diverse workplace
  • List categories of people protected from discrimination by federal law.
  • Define stereotypes, prejudices, and cultural tendencies, and indicate how they affect a workplace
  • Recognize practices that promote workplace diversity and cross-cultural interaction and communication.
  • Explain the importance of ethical decision making; the role of codes of ethics in restaurant and foodservice operations; and tasks involved in developing, implementing, and enforcing codes of ethics.
case study
Case Study
  • Let’s review the Case Study on page 3 of the text book
  • What do you think about the kitchen manager’s analysis of the situation?
  • What are some points Jeremy should make in his next meeting with the kitchen manager?
management of human resources is important continued
Management of Human Resources Is Important continued
  • Pre-Management Activities
    • Define goals
      • Policies and Procedures
    • Establish strategies
    • Define ways to get the work done
management of human resources is important continued1
Management of Human Resources Is Important continued
  • Initial Operation Activities
    • Organization of tasks and duties
      • Determining how and by whom
    • Coordination of resources
    • Staffing opportunities
      • Job/Position descriptions & specification
      • Recruit the right candidates
management of human resources is important continued2
Management of Human Resources Is Important continued
  • Secondary Operation Activities
    • Supervision of process and team
      • Directing, planning and facilitating
    • Controlling and keeping on track of established goals
management of human resources is important continued3
Management of Human Resources Is Important continued
  • Post-Management Activity
    • Evaluate and assessment:
      • Are goals attained
      • Evaluate employee performance
management of human resources is important continued4
Management of Human Resources Is Important continued
  • Prime Expenses/Cost
    • Approximately 65% of the Operating Budget
      • Labor
      • Food and Supplies
  • On-going supervision and management required for both for the business to survive
  • Typically managers and supervisors spend more time on staff-related issues than any other activity.
changing employee expectations continued
Changing Employee Expectations continued
  • Employees may have different perceptions about work
  • What influences their perception?
  • How does this change the way you manage?
managers facilitate their employees work
Managers Facilitate Their Employees’ Work
  • What is the definition of facilitate?
  • How can managers help in preparing their team for the work at hand?
  • Is there a difference between ‘leaders’ and managers?
managers facilitate their employees work continued
Managers Facilitate Their Employees’ Work continued
  • Leadership Factors:
    • Provide Direction
    • Lead Consistently
    • Influence Others
    • Foster Teamwork
    • Motivate Others
    • Coach & Develop employees
    • Champion Change
managers facilitate their employees work continued2
Managers Facilitate Their Employees’ Work continued
  • Financial management
  • Quality management
  • View problems as opportunities
leadership styles continued
Leadership Styles continued
  • Which specific types of food service operations might each of these styles work best and why?
    • Autocratic
    • Bureaucratic
    • Democratic
    • Laissez-Faire
corporate culture
Corporate Culture
  • What comes to mind when you think of the ‘Corporate Culture’
  • Is this a good or bad thing - from your perspective?
corporate culture continued
Corporate Culture continued
  • Employers of Choice
    • Employees are treated with respect and dignity
    • Emphasize careers rather than jobs
    • Employees are treated as an asset
    • Jobs are continually challenging
    • Work-Life Flexibility
    • Low turnover rate
actions to improve employer of choice status
Actions to improve Employer of Choice status
  • Hire the right people
  • Provide ongoing training and development
  • Understand/listen to employees
  • Take action to keep employees involved and engaged
what is diversity
What Is Diversity?
  • Differences among people (employees, vendors, and guests)
  • All people must be treated equally without regard to race, color, national origin, or any other trait related to that person’s role at the foodservice operation.
diversity
Diversity
  • Thinking about what you heard in your introductions alone……..

List the differences among the students in this class

bases of possible differences between people
Gender

Age

Group affiliation

Physical/learning abilities

Physical/mental disabilities

Nationality

Ethnic background

Skill level

Bases of Possible Differences Between People
bases of possible differences between people continued
Sexual orientation

Physical appearance

Economic level

Skin color

Educational level

Political references

Career goals

Religion

Race

Bases of Possible Differences Between People continued
benefits of a diverse working environment
Benefits of a Diverse Working Environment
  • Creates a more enjoyable and productive workplace
  • Attracts more customers
  • Increases the labor pool
  • Improves legal protection
avoiding illegal discrimination
Avoiding Illegal Discrimination
  • Definition—Making an arbitrary distinction between job applicants or employees on any employment action on the basis of any personal characteristic protected under federal, state, or local laws
  • Employers cannot create or allow a hostile environment based on protected characteristics.
federally protected personal characteristics
Race

Color

Religion

Sex

National origin

Age (forty or over)

Disability

Military service

Pregnancy

Citizenship

Federally Protected Personal Characteristics
federal equal opportunity employment laws
Federal Equal Opportunity Employment Laws
  • The ten federally protected characteristics are called “protected categories.”
  • Individuals who share a federally protected characteristic are called federally protected classes (groups).
  • Persons in federally protected classes (groups) along with all other persons cannot be discriminated against.
other anti discrimination requirements
Other Anti-Discrimination Requirements
  • Additional rules affect businesses contracting with the federal government and operations that accept federal grants or funds.
  • State and some local laws may also address equal employment opportunity.
how would you answer the following questions
How Would You Answer the Following Questions?
  • The task of recruiting potential employees occurs (before/after) they are screened.
  • How many federally protected characteristics comprise the “protected categories” in federal equal opportunity employment laws?
  • The best way to ensure compliance with all laws is to treat everyone equally. (True/False)
  • Personal characteristics that are addressed in equal opportunity employment laws are referred to as federally protected ______.
let s define terms
Let’s Define Terms!
  • Stereotypes—generalizations about particular groups of people that assume all members of the group are the same
  • Prejudice (bias)—general attitude about a person or group based on a judgment unrelated to abilities
  • Cultural tendencies—common ways of acting, based on beliefs and habits shared by persons in a group
activity
Activity
  • Let’s list together how we might “describe” each of the following:
    • Doctors
    • Baptists
    • Muslims
    • African-Americans
    • Plumbers
    • Secretaries
    • Computer professionals
    • Short-Order cooks
    • New Englanders
    • Texans
diverse employees working as a team
Diverse Employees Working as a Team

This diverse group of restaurant employees work together as a team in a welcoming environment.

prejudice and stereotypes affect the workplace
Prejudice and Stereotypes Affect the Workplace
  • Problems of prejudice and stereotypes counter the benefits of diversity.
  • Actions may be contrary to law.
  • Results can create a culture of distrust and frustration.
promoting diversity
Promoting Diversity
  • Step 1 –Recruit for diversity.
        • Recruitment of members of minority groups should be an active process.
        • A recruiting goal should be to employ a diverse workforce.
        • Candidates will not be judged by immutable characteristics.
promoting diversity continued
Promoting Diversity continued
  • Step 2 – Increase cross-cultural interaction.
        • Develop a mission statement that emphasizes diversity.
        • Develop policies/procedures driven by the mission statement.
        • Implement aggressive recruiting practices.
        • Assure that managers model expected behavior.
        • Conduct diversity training sessions.
promoting diversity continued1
Promoting Diversity continued
  • Additional ways to increase cross-cultural interaction
    • Improve communication.
    • Assist employees with literacy problems.
promoting diversity continued2
Promoting Diversity continued
  • Step 3 – Educate employees and set expectations.
        • Employees must be educated about behaviors that are and are not acceptable in the workplace.
        • The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission requires the posting of notices about laws prohibiting discrimination.
        • Continuing education about the value of diversity and the encouragement of tolerance should be ongoing.
promoting diversity continued3
Promoting Diversity continued
  • Step 4 – Address issues and accountability.
        • Look for signs of behavior or elements of a hostile environment.
        • Stop discriminatory behavior as soon as it is seen or heard about.
        • Hold employees accountable for their behavior.
        • Remember the long-range goal; focus on correcting employees’ behavior.
ethical concerns
Ethical Concerns
  • Ethics relates to rules or principles that help define what is right and what is wrong
  • Does something have to be illegal to be wrong?
ethical concerns continued
Ethical Concerns continued
  • Managers should Lead by Example!
  • Basic principals managers should follow:
    • Trustworthiness
    • Loyalty to organization
    • Fairness
    • Concern and respect
    • Commitment to excellence
    • Reputation and morale
    • Accountability
code of ethics
Code of Ethics
  • Code of Ethics is a written set of guidelines to indicate the preferred behavior of an establishment employees.
  • Code might include the following topics:
    • Overview
    • Responsibilities to: customers, employees, community & society, vendors
    • Employees to Employer and vise versa
    • Violations to the code
code of ethics continued
Code of Ethics continued
  • In business, if an action is legal and profitable, is it therefore ethical?
  • What is an example of an action that is legal and profitable but not ethical?
  • In what specific ways can ethical behavior “cost” a manager and his or her operation?
  • In what specific ways can ethical behavior “benefit” a manager and his or her operation?
how would you answer the following questions1
How Would You Answer the Following Questions?
  • Stereotypes can produce _______, which is a general attitude toward a person or group based on judgments unrelated to abilities.
  • Discriminatory treatment, including harassment, is _______.
  • Recruiting a diverse staff is typically all that is necessary to foster positive cross-cultural interaction. (True/False)
  • Teasing can be a sign of a hostile work environment. (True/False)
key terms
Key Terms:
  • Authority The power to direct the work of employees.
  • Autocratic (leadership style) A leadership style in which the manager generally makes decisions and resolves problems without input from employees.
  • Bureaucratic (leadership style) A leadership style that relies on rules, regulations, policies, and procedures.
  • Code of ethics A formal statement developed by an operation that explains how its employees should relate to each other and to the persons and groups with whom they interact.
key terms continued
Key Terms: continued
  • Competitive advantage A strategy, tactic, or process that is not offered by a competitor of an establishment.
  • Controlling Keeping an establishment on track to achieve goals.
  • Corporate culture The shared beliefs, experiences, and standards that characterize a company.
  • Democratic (leadership style) A leadership approach that encourages employees to participate in the decision-making process.
key terms continued1
Key Terms: continued
  • Discrimination The act of treating persons unequally for reasons that do not relate to their abilities, including race, color, religion, gender, national origin, age, and mental or physical abilities.
  • Diversity The concept that people are unique with individual differences and variations in race, ethnicity, gender, socioeconomic status, age, and physical abilities, among others.
  • Employer of choice A company that is a desired place of employment because employees are treated with dignity and respect.
  • Ethics The rules or principles that help define what is right and what is wrong.
key terms continued2
Key Terms: continued
  • Evaluating Assessing the extent to which plans are attained, and identifying issues or problems.
  • Job description A description of the tasks a person in a position must be able to perform.
  • Job specification A listing of the personal requirements such as skills and abilities needed to successfully perform tasks in a position.
  • Laissez-faire (leadership style) A leadership style in which the manager does not direct work but instead delegates most decisions.
key terms continued3
Key Terms: continued
  • Morale The feelings that employees have about their employer, their workplace, and other aspects of the operation.
  • Orientation program A formal plan for welcoming new employees and teaching them general information that all staff members must know.
  • Prejudice A general attitude toward a person, group, or organization based on judgments unrelated to abilities or reality, also called bias.
  • Quality The consistent production and delivery of products and services according to expected standards.
key terms continued4
Key Terms: continued
  • Sexual harassment Unwelcome sexual advances, sexual favor requests, and other verbal or physical conduct that is sexual in nature and may create an offensive, intimidating, or hostile work environment.
  • Span of control The number of employees that can be supervised by one person.
  • Staffing The process of finding the right people for the job.
  • Quality The consistent production and delivery of products and services according to expected standards.
key terms continued5
Key Terms: continued
  • Sexual harassment Unwelcome sexual advances, sexual favor requests, and other verbal or physical conduct that is sexual in nature and may create an offensive, intimidating, or hostile work environment.
  • Span of control The number of employees that can be supervised by one person.
  • Staffing The process of finding the right people for the job.
  • Quality The consistent production and delivery of products and services according to expected standards.
key terms continued6
Key Terms: continued
  • Sexual harassment Unwelcome sexual advances, sexual favor requests, and other verbal or physical conduct that is sexual in nature and may create an offensive, intimidating, or hostile work environment.
  • Span of control The number of employees that can be supervised by one person.
  • Staffing The process of finding the right people for the job.
  • Stereotype A belief about particular groups that assumes all members of that group are the same.
key terms continued7
Key Terms: continued
  • Supervising Planning for and facilitating the work of employees, also called directing.
  • Turnover The rate at which employees leave an operation and are replaced with new employees.
  • Vision An idea about what an organization would be like if it were ideal.
next week
Next Week
  • Read Chapters 1 & 2
  • Article Review: Restaurant & Foodservice Operations are Labor Intensive
  • Project: Written Summary of Business

1 page description of the business you will be designing in the development of a Human Resource Plan. Include name of company, hours of operation, seats/beds/rooms or other unit of volume or size, general location and any theme or genre that would define your operation.