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Welcome

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Welcome

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    Slide 2:Welcome!

    Workshop objectives: WHAT is instant messaging? WHY are we using it in the library? HOW can your library get involved? In How section, well take you through the procedure for signing up for an account and let you get some hands on experience with instant messaging.In How section, well take you through the procedure for signing up for an account and let you get some hands on experience with instant messaging.

    Slide 4:What is instant messaging?

    Main purpose: one-on-one, real-time messaging over the Internet Ancillary functions: File transfers, chat rooms, voice over IP Most commonly referred to as IM, which can be a noun (Are you logged into IM?) or a verb (IM me!) IM equivalent of an email address is your screen name (or buddy name)

    Slide 5:What is IM? (continued)

    Typically accomplished through a small, free program you download and install on your computer There are also web-based versions, notably AIM Express, that can be used through a browser with no additional software How are messages sent? Manually typing in another users screen name Clicking a name on your buddy list

    Slide 6:Different kinds of IM

    IRC (Internet Relay Chat) is grandaddy of IMintroduced in 1988 AOL Instant Messenger (AIM) is, by far, the most widely used IM service Yahoo and MSN also offer messaging services (and will soon be interoperable) Google Talk is new player (and Google recently integrated it into gmail) Different standards mean these disparate services are not currently interoperable (although Google Talk is using Jabber, an open standard, and Yahoo and MSN recently announced that their programs will soon be able to talk to each other)Different standards mean these disparate services are not currently interoperable (although Google Talk is using Jabber, an open standard, and Yahoo and MSN recently announced that their programs will soon be able to talk to each other)

    Slide 7:So how to pick a service?

    Good news: you dont have to choose just one! IM aggregator programs like Trillian <http://www.ceruleanstudios.com/learn/> and meebo <http://www17.meebo.com/> allow you to sign in to multiple services simultaneously If using multiple services, try to get the same screen name across services

    Slide 9:Who is instant messaging

    Among undergrads, almost everybody July 2005 Pew Report (Internet and American Life Project) 42% of adults use IM 75% of teens aged 12-17 IM preferred to email <http://www.pewinternet.org/pdfs/PIP_Teens_Tech_July2005web.pdf> November 2005 cnet poll 66% of 13- to 21-year-olds say they send more IMs than emails <http://news.com.com/Study+Teenagers+favor+IM+over+e-mail/2100-1032_3-5944265.html> For undergrads, IMing is a form of communication as natural, and as taken for granted, as using a phone or sending an email message (not being available over IM is like not having a telephone number), and they will increasingly expect it as an option for talking to the library. This brings us to the second section:For undergrads, IMing is a form of communication as natural, and as taken for granted, as using a phone or sending an email message (not being available over IM is like not having a telephone number), and they will increasingly expect it as an option for talking to the library. This brings us to the second section:

    Slide 10:Going where our patrons are

    Were at their fingertipsif they add us to their buddy list, they can be talking to us in one click Builds relationships with users IM is user-centered. Users arent required to enter into an alienating librarian-designed environment to receive assistance. (Web-Based Chat vs. Instant Messaging, Sarah Houghton and Aaron Schmidt, Online July/August 2005) -Increasingly, cell phones and other mobile devices are IM-enabled, so users dont need to be tethered to a computer to talk to us -IMing makes the library seem with it-Increasingly, cell phones and other mobile devices are IM-enabled, so users dont need to be tethered to a computer to talk to us -IMing makes the library seem with it

    Slide 11:IM vs. Docutek Chat

    IM performance is superior in most cases: Initiating sessions Interaction with users Reliability Cost Docutek does offer workflow advantages Initiating: user can be chatting with us much more quickly, and less invasively, when IMing Interaction: messaging with IM is much more fluid and feels more like a conversation Reliability: IM isnt flaky like Docutek, doesnt have some problems with particular browsers and popup blockers. Cost: IM=free (nominal cost for Trillian) Initiating: user can be chatting with us much more quickly, and less invasively, when IMing Interaction: messaging with IM is much more fluid and feels more like a conversation Reliability: IM isnt flaky like Docutek, doesnt have some problems with particular browsers and popup blockers. Cost: IM=free (nominal cost for Trillian)

    Slide 12:IM vs. Docutek (2)

    Getting started Docutek: Have to log in, entering personal information each time, and then wait for the sluggish interface to load IM: User simply opens IM program and types message Messaging Docutek: There is a substantial and disorienting lag between when message is sent and when it appears on the other end. No feedback as to when other person is typing. IM: Message appears at the other end virtually instantaneously, and you can see when the other person is typing. End result: interactions are much more fluid and feel more like a conversation.

    Slide 13:IM vs. Docutek (3)

    Reliability Docutek: Periodically freezes, sometimes doesnt notify when a new patron is in queue, is picky about certain browser configurations IM: Very stable, browser-independent Cost Docutek: Substantial yearly maintenance fee IM: Free! (nominal cost for Trillian Pro software)

    Slide 14:IM vs. Docutek (4)

    Workflow management Docutek: allows queuing of patrons when there are multiple patrons Docutek: allows multiple libraries/librarians to monitor the same queue and answer incoming calls These features distribute questions and decrease stress at busy times IM: No queuing, no sharing of queues. One login per buddy name = that call is for you!

    Slide 15:So why are we still offering Docutek chat at all?

    Allows for distributed pool of answerers for a single queue of patrons (vs. IM, which only allows you to be logged in under a particular screen name on one machine at a time) For users who dont have IM software and dont want to use web-based IM (which still requires an account with an IM provider) Better info for librarians before initiating chat In a moment, David will be talking about the pilot study that undergrad and reference have taken comparing IM and chat servicesIn a moment, David will be talking about the pilot study that undergrad and reference have taken comparing IM and chat services

    Slide 16:IM as an office tool

    IM isnt just useful for talking to patronslibrary staff can use it to talk to each other AOL Survey on AIM use in the workplace: Screen name on your business card? Avoid difficult in-person interactions? <http://www.pcworld.com/news/article/0,aid,123518,00.asp> As of September 2004, 21% of Americans used IM at work (How Americans Use Instant Messaging, Pew Report) http://www.pewinternet.org/pdfs/PIP_Instantmessage_Report.pdf

    Source: Parents Fret That Dialing Up Interferes With Growing Up, New York Times, October 23, 2005

    Slide 18:From a recent New York Times article of the What are these crazy kids saying? varietyFrom a recent New York Times article of the What are these crazy kids saying? variety

    Slide 19:Lingo

    Common fear is that IM-speak will be indecipherable In our experience, users keep abbreviations and slang to a minimum All-lowercase typing is typical, and allows for a speedier conversation Patrons adapt their communication styles depending on whether theyre addressing peers or non-peers, like librarians. Just as the average undergrad doesnt come to the reference desk and say Yo, whats up dog?, the average IM patron will use standard English.Patrons adapt their communication styles depending on whether theyre addressing peers or non-peers, like librarians. Just as the average undergrad doesnt come to the reference desk and say Yo, whats up dog?, the average IM patron will use standard English.

    Slide 20:Viruses and SPIM

    As with email, viruses and junkmail can be transmitted via IM. Also as with email, the antivirus software that is standard on all library machines protects against most threats. To get infected while using IM, you typically need to either click on a link or accept a file transfer. Neither of these things should come up in the course of a normal library IM session. SPIM=IM spam. Nowhere near as bad as email, but occasionally a commercial message will pop up. Just ignore these, and dont click any links. The undergrad and reference screen names have been sitting on the open web for almost a year now, and we receive very little SPIMThe undergrad and reference screen names have been sitting on the open web for almost a year now, and we receive very little SPIM

    Slide 21:Privacy: Yours and the patrons

    When signing up for an IM account, avoid providing unnecessary personal information Like email, regular IMing is about as secure as sending a postcard through the mail, so exercise common sense and dont send anything highly personal or confidential via IM Transcripts of chats are stored on both your local machine and, presumably, on the IM services servers

    Slide 22:Is instant messaging difficult?

    IM software is extremely easy to use If you can type and click a button, and occasionally copy and paste a link, you can IM Speed of transactions (Will I be able to type fast enough?) One study found that IMers have an average of 2.7 conversations going at onceso dont panic! <http://www.livescience.com/technology/050301_internet_language.html>

    Slide 24:Library: Is IM a library service? Patrons: Yes!

    April 2005: IM volume was more than double Chat. Overall virtual reference questions increased by 40% over April 2004

    Slide 25:Who is using IM at UIUC?

    85% of our IM questions come from UIUC Undergrads 11% graduate students 1.5% faculty/staff 3% other (alumni, public, etc.)

    Slide 26:What are they asking?

    Data analysis for IM is on-going For Chat the same questions as in-person 35% research assistance 30% finding known items Other categories of questions Online access troubleshooting Citation assistance/Refworks Different than questions we receive via email Preference for research assistance is live

    Slide 27:When are we busy?

    (Sept 2005)

    Slide 28:Concerns with adding IM: Could we do more?

    YES We were (a little) nervous Staff were (mostly) willing Training was easy interface is easy Overall staff at all levels like IM: easy to use and grateful patrons ? BUT ? Volume of IM is high Some stress with multiple IMs IM only logged in once per library cant share the work among available staff or between libraries

    Slide 29:Why Chat and IM?

    36% of Chat users are UIUC graduate students (vs. 11% of IM users) 10% of Chat users are UIUC faculty (vs. 1.5% of IM users) Chat vastly preferred by unaffiliated users with questions about UIUCs library. During the summer, when campus has a smaller number of undergrads, Chat volume surpassed IM volume. (2:1 in July) Bottom-line: faculty and graduate students (not yet) using IM. No one is likely to start using IM just to ask us a question.

    Slide 31:UIUC IM Service Model

    Staffed concurrently with other reference services Separate Accounts (Buddy Names) on central page User Selects Buddy they want to contact Trillian software (AIM, MSN, Yahoo, Google)

    Slide 32:UIUC IM Service Model

    Role of Ask-A-Librarian page Referrals and Consultations No built-in referral mechanism (yet) Departmental Collections Often call other libraries Refer to email (central and departmental) Users expect full-text, but accept referrals

    Slide 33:Other Possible Service Models

    On Desk (concurrent) Same hours as regular reference service Can be too busy In office (1) Select hours advertised on unit website Can share between units (divisional service) In office (2) Office Hours Advertise through BI sessions

    Slide 34:Promoting IM

    Promote your screen name and service Admin should be messaging as well Train and encourage staff to communicate via IM from their desks Add your IM name to your business cards from Aaron Schmidt presentation, Having a telephone http://www.walkingpaper.org/presentation/havingaphone/

    Slide 35:Other Possible Service Models

    Use us. Please. Include link to Ask-A-Librarian page with unit email and telephone information Central service will refer back to unit when applicable (see: http://www.library.uiuc.edu/cpsdev/altnav/ask_mockup.htm ) Main Ask A Librarian page can list all services

    Slide 36:Recommended reading

    Abram, Stephen. Twenty Reasons to Love IM. Information Outlook, October 2004, 8(1), p. 40-42. Houghton, Sarah and Aaron Schmidt. Web-Based Chat vs. Instant Messaging. Online, July/Aug 2005, 29(4), p. 26-30. Online Safety/Security FAQ. AOL Instant Messenger Help Page. http://www.aim.com/help_faq/security/faq.adp?aolp= Spanbauer, Scott et al. A Grown-Ups Guide to Instant Messaging. PC World, March 2004, 22(3), p. 168-170.