slide1 l.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
WELCOME PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
WELCOME

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 78

WELCOME - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 342 Views
  • Uploaded on

MACHINE GUARDING CORPORATE SAFETY TRAINING 29 CFR 1910.211-222 WELCOME BASIS FOR THIS COURSE Proper Machine Guarding Results in Accident Reduction Elimination of Workplace Injuries & Illnesses Where Possible Reduction of Workplace Injuries & Illnesses Where Possible

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'WELCOME' - ostinmannual


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
slide1

MACHINE GUARDING

CORPORATE SAFETY TRAINING

29 CFR 1910.211-222

WELCOME

slide2

BASIS FOR THIS COURSE

  • Proper Machine Guarding Results in Accident Reduction
  • Elimination of Workplace Injuries & Illnesses Where Possible
  • Reduction of Workplace Injuries & Illnesses Where Possible
  • Development of Efficient Machine Guarding Techniques
  • OSHA Safety Standards Require:
    • Machines Be Properly Guarded
    • Training Be Conducted
    • Hazards and Precautions Be Explained
    • A “Safety” Program Be Established
    • Job Hazards Be Assessed and Controlled
slide3

REGULATORY STANDARD

THE GENERAL DUTY CLAUSE

FEDERAL - 29 CFR 1903.1

EMPLOYERS MUST: Furnish a place of employment free of recognized hazards that are causing or are likely to cause death or serious physical harm to employees. Employers must comply with occupational safety and health standards promulgated under the Williams-Steiger Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970.

OSHA ACT OF 1970

industry consensus standards
INDUSTRY CONSENSUS STANDARDS

ANSI - B11.2 Hydraulic presses

B11.3 Power Press Brakes

B11.10 Metal Sawing Machines

B11.11 Gear Cutting Machines

B11.12 Roll-Forming and Bending Machines

B11.14 Coil Slitting Machines

B11.15 Pipe, Tube, and Shape Bending

B11.16 Metal Powder Compacting Presses

B11.17 Horizontal Hydraulic Extrusion

B11.18 Coiled Steel Processing

industry consensus standards5
INDUSTRY CONSENSUS STANDARDS

ANSI - B11.19 Machine Tools, Safeguarding

B11.20 Manufacturing Systems/Cells

slide6

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

ALL EMPLOYERS MUST:

MACHINE

GUARDING

PROGRAM

  • Install Machine Safeguards
  • Review Job Specific Hazards
  • Implement Corrective Actions
  • Conduct Hazard Assessments
  • Conduct Accident Investigations
  • Provide Training to All Required Employees
  • Control Workplace Hazards Using PPE As a Last Resort
basics of machine guarding
BASICS OF MACHINE GUARDING
  • Where Mechanical Hazards Occur
  • The Point of Operation:
  • Power Transmission Apparatus:
  • Other Moving Parts:
basics of machine guarding8

LATHE

BASICS OF MACHINE GUARDING
  • Where Mechanical Hazards Occur
  • The Point of Operation: Where work is performed on the material, such as:
  • Cutting
  • Shaping
  • Boring
  • Forming of stock
basics of machine guarding9

300 RPM

BASICS OF MACHINE GUARDING
  • Where Mechanical Hazards Occur
  • Power Transmission Apparatus: All components of the mechanical system which transmit energy to the part of the machine performing the work.
basics of machine guarding10
BASICS OF MACHINE GUARDING
  • Where Mechanical Hazards Occur
  • Other Moving Parts: Any part of the machine which moves while the machine is working.
  • Rotating parts
  • Feed mechanisms
  • Reciprocating parts
  • Transverse moving parts
  • Auxiliary parts of the machine
basics of machine guarding11
BASICS OF MACHINE GUARDING
  • Hazardous Mechanical Motions and Actions
  • A wide variety of mechanical motions and actions may present hazards to the worker:
  • Rotating members
  • Reciprocating arms
  • Moving belts
  • Meshing gears
  • Cutting teeth
  • Any parts that impact or shear
basics of machine guarding12
BASICS OF MACHINE GUARDING

Hazardous Mechanical Motions and Actions

Recognition of these hazards is the first step toward protecting workers from the danger they present.

basics of machine guarding13

NIP POINT

BASICS OF MACHINE GUARDING
  • Hazardous Mechanical Motions
  • Motions
  • Rotating
  • Reciprocating
  • Transversing
basics of machine guarding14

SHEARITE

CUTTING BLADES

BASICS OF MACHINE GUARDING
  • Hazardous Mechanical Actions
  • Actions
  • Cutting
  • Punching
  • Shearing
  • Bending
basics of machine guarding15
BASICS OF MACHINE GUARDING
  • Hazardous Mechanical Motions
  • Rotating Motions

- Collars - Couplings - Cams

- Clutches - Flywheels - Shaft ends

- Spindles - Meshing gears - Horizontal shafts

- Vertical shafts

basics of machine guarding16
BASICS OF MACHINE GUARDING
  • Hazardous Mechanical Motions
  • Rotating Motions

Rotating motions can grip clothing, and through mere skin contact force a limb into a dangerous position. The danger increases when projections such as set screws, bolts, nicks, abrasions, and projecting keys or set screws are exposed on rotating parts.

basics of machine guarding17

NIP POINT

NIP POINT

RECIPROCATING

MOTION

BASICS OF MACHINE GUARDING
  • Hazardous Mechanical Motions
  • Reciprocating Motions
basics of machine guarding18

RECIPROCATING

MOTION

CAUGHT “IN-BETWEEN”

OR “STRUCK-BY”

BASICS OF MACHINE GUARDING
  • Hazardous Mechanical Motions
  • Reciprocating Motions
basics of machine guarding19

TRAVEL

IN-RUNNING NIP POINTS

BASICS OF MACHINE GUARDING
  • Hazardous Mechanical Motions
  • Transversing Motions
basics of machine guarding20
BASICS OF MACHINE GUARDING
  • Hazardous Mechanical Motions
  • Rotating Motions

NIP POINTS

basics of machine guarding21
BASICS OF MACHINE GUARDING
  • Hazardous Mechanical Actions
  • Cutting Actions

- Rotating motions

- Reciprocating motions

- Transversing motions

The danger of cutting action exists at the point of operation where finger, arm and bodily injuries can occur and where flying chips or scrap material can strike the head, particularly in the area of the eyes or face.

basics of machine guarding22
BASICS OF MACHINE GUARDING
  • Hazardous Mechanical Actions
  • Cutting Actions
  • Bandsaws
  • Circular saws
  • Boring machines
  • Drilling machines
  • Turning machines (lathes)
  • Milling machines
basics of machine guarding23

20 TON

PRESS

PRESS

ACME

PRESSES

BASICS OF MACHINE GUARDING
  • Hazardous Mechanical Actions
  • Punching Actions
  • Power presses
  • Iron workers
  • The principle hazard occurs at the point of operation where stock is inserted, held or withdrawn.
basics of machine guarding24

DANGER

CUTTING EDGE

PRESS

PRESS

SHEARITE

POWER SHEARS

BASICS OF MACHINE GUARDING
  • Hazardous Mechanical Actions
  • Shearing/Bending Actions
  • Mechanical shears
  • Hydraulic shears
  • Pneumatic shears
  • The principle hazard occurs at the point of operation where stock is inserted, held or withdrawn.

SHEAR TERROR

basics of machine guarding25
BASICS OF MACHINE GUARDING
  • Requirements for Safeguards
  • Be securely attached
  • Create no new hazards
  • Withstand operational conditions
  • Allow for safe routine maintenance
  • Allow for safe operator adjustments
  • Withstand environmental conditions
  • Provide protection from falling objects
  • Prevent contact with hazardous conditions
  • Create no interference in the conduct of work
basics of machine guarding26

HOT SURFACE

BASICS OF MACHINE GUARDING
  • Nonmechanical Hazard Considerations:
  • Power sources are potential sources of danger
  • How will guarding affect equipment operation?
  • Ensure proper grounding of systems
  • Replace frayed, exposed , or old wiring
  • Consider effects of - High pressure systems
  • - Extreme temp. conditions
  • - Pulsation, vibration, or leaks
  • - Noise or unwanted sounds
  • - Cutting fluids and coolants
basics of machine guarding27
BASICS OF MACHINE GUARDING
  • Operator Training Considerations:
  • Provide instruction and or hands-on training
  • Discuss the purpose of safeguards
  • Cover associated hazards thoroughly
  • Involve guard designers in the training
  • Describe how to properly use safeguards
  • Describe how safeguards provide protection
  • Describe circumstances for safeguard removal
  • Explain what to do if safeguards are damaged
  • Explain what to do if safeguards are missing
basics of machine guarding28
BASICS OF MACHINE GUARDING
  • Operator Training Considerations:

Defeating, altering, or removing safeguards can cause injury to co-workers and can leave the person performing such actions liable under the OSHA Act of 1970.

basics of machine guarding29
BASICS OF MACHINE GUARDING
  • Protective Clothing and Equipment Considerations:
  • ENGINEERING CONTROLS FIRST CHOICE
    •  Work Station Design  Tool Selection and Design
    •  Process Modification  Mechanical Assist
  •  ADMINISTRATIVE CONTROLS SECOND CHOICE
    •  Training Programs  Job Rotation/Enlargement
    •  Pacing  Policy and Procedures
  •  PERSONNEL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT LAST CHOICE
    •  Gloves  Wraps
    •  Shields  Eye Protection
    •  Non-Slip Shoes  Aprons
basics of machine guarding30
BASICS OF MACHINE GUARDING
  • Protective Clothing and Equipment Considerations:
  • Appropriate for the particular hazard(s)
  • Maintained in good condition
  • Properly stored when not in use
  • Kept clean, fully functional, and sanitary
methods of machine guarding
METHODS OF MACHINE GUARDING
  • Guarding Method Dependant on:
  • Type of material
  • Type of operation
  • Method of handling
  • Size or shape of stock
  • Physical layout of the work area
  • Production requirements or limitations
methods of machine guarding32
METHODS OF MACHINE GUARDING
  • Manufacturers Recommendation:

Before beginning the process of guard procurement, design, or installation, the equipment manufacturer should be consulted for advice.

methods of machine guarding33
METHODS OF MACHINE GUARDING
  • Generally:
  • Power transmission apparatus is best protected by fixed guards that enclose the danger areas
  • Point of operation hazard guarding will vary
methods of machine guarding34
METHODS OF MACHINE GUARDING
  • Safeguards Are Grouped Under 5 Classifications:
  • Guards
  • Devices
  • Locations/Distance
  • Feeding and ejection methods
  • Miscellaneous aids
methods of machine guarding36
METHODS OF MACHINE GUARDING
  • Guards:
  • Guards are barriers which prevent access to danger areas, there are four general types:
  • Fixed guards
  • Interlocked guards
  • Adjustable guards
  • Self-Adjusting guards
methods of machine guarding37
METHODS OF MACHINE GUARDING
  • Fixed Guards:
  • Fixed guards are a permanent part of the machine and not dependent upon moving parts to perform its intended function.
methods of machine guarding38
METHODS OF MACHINE GUARDING
  • Fixed Guards:

ADVANTAGES

  • Can be constructed to suit many different applications
  • In-plant construction is often possible
  • Can provide maximum protection
  • Usually requires minimum maintenance
  • Can be suitable to high production operations
  • Can be suitable to high repetition operations
methods of machine guarding39
METHODS OF MACHINE GUARDING
  • Fixed Guards:

LIMITATIONS

  • May interfere with visibility
  • Can be limited to specific operations
  • Machine adjustments and repair often require guard removal, thereby necessitating other means of protection for maintenance personnel
methods of machine guarding40
METHODS OF MACHINE GUARDING
  • Interlocked Guards:
  • Interlocked guards are designed to automatically shut off or disengage the machine if the guard is opened or removed

AUTOMATIC

VISUAL ALARM

AUTOMATIC

AUDIBLE ALARM

methods of machine guarding41
METHODS OF MACHINE GUARDING
  • Interlocked Guards:
  • Interlocked guards may use:
  • Electrical power
  • Mechanical power
  • Hydraulic power
  • Pneumatic power

OR ANY COMBINATION OF POWER SOURCES

methods of machine guarding42
METHODS OF MACHINE GUARDING
  • Interlocked Guards:
  • Interlocks should not prevent “inching” by remote control if required
  • Replacing guards should not automatically restart the machine

IMPORTANT

methods of machine guarding43
METHODS OF MACHINE GUARDING
  • Interlocked Guards:

ADVANTAGES

  • Can provide maximum protection
  • Allows access to machine for removing jams without time consuming removal of fixed guards

LIMITATIONS

  • Requires careful adjustment and maintenance
  • May be easy to disengage jams
methods of machine guarding44
METHODS OF MACHINE GUARDING
  • Adjustable Guards:
  • Typically adjusted by the operator
  • Accommodate various sizes of stock
  • May require additional operator training
  • Adjustable guards are typically used on:
  • Bandsaws
  • Tablesaws
  • Power presses
  • Routers
  • Similar equipment
methods of machine guarding45
METHODS OF MACHINE GUARDING
  • Adjustable Guards:

ADVANTAGES

  • Can be constructed to suit many specific applications
  • Can be adjusted to admit varying sizes of stock

LIMITATIONS

  • Hands may enter danger area
  • Protection may not be complete at all times
  • May require frequent maintenance and or adjustment
  • The guard can be defeated by the operator
  • May interfere with visibility
methods of machine guarding46
METHODS OF MACHINE GUARDING
  • Self-Adjusting Guards:
  • Adjusts automatically to the work
  • Accommodate various sizes of stock
  • May require additional operator training
  • Self-Adjusting guards are typically used on:
  • Radial arm saws
  • Tablesaws
  • Circular saws
  • Routers
  • Jointers
  • Similar equipment
methods of machine guarding47
METHODS OF MACHINE GUARDING
  • Self-Adjusting Guards:

ADVANTAGES

  • Off-the-shelf guards are often commercially available

LIMITATIONS

  • Protection may not be complete at all times
  • May require frequent maintenance and or adjustment
  • May interfere with visibility
methods of machine guarding49
METHODS OF MACHINE GUARDING
  • Devices:
  • Devices fall into four general types:
  • Presence-Sensing devices
  • Pullback devices
  • Restraint devices
  • Safety trip controls
methods of machine guarding50
METHODS OF MACHINE GUARDING
  • Devices:
  • Devices may perform one of several function:
  • Stop a machine if a body part is in danger
  • Restrain or withdraw a hand if it is in danger
  • Require activation by the use of both hands
  • Provide a barrier synchronized to the operation
methods of machine guarding51

PRESS

PRESS

ACME

PRESSES

METHODS OF MACHINE GUARDING
  • Presence-Sensing:
  • Photoelectric
  • Radiofrequency
  • Electromechanical
methods of machine guarding52
METHODS OF MACHINE GUARDING
  • Presence-Sensing:

Before beginning the process of procurement, design, or installation, the equipment manufacturer should be consulted for advice.

methods of machine guarding53

20 TON

PRESS

PRESS

ACME

PRESSES

METHODS OF MACHINE GUARDING
  • Presence-Sensing:
  • Photoelectric
  • Radiofrequency
  • Electromechanical
methods of machine guarding54

NYLON PULLBACK

STRAPS ATTACHED TO WRISTBANDS

METHODS OF MACHINE GUARDING
  • Pullback Devices:
  • Attached to Wrists
  • Positioning Critical
  • Adjustment Critical
  • Maintenance Critical
  • Training Critical
  • Must Stop Machine
  • Immediately!
methods of machine guarding55
METHODS OF MACHINE GUARDING
  • Restraint Devices:
  • Uses Cables or Straps
  • Affixes to Hands
  • May Need Feeding Tools
  • Adjustment Critical
  • Positioning Critical
  • Maintenance Critical
  • Training Critical
  • Must Restrain Body Part
  • From Hazard!
methods of machine guarding56
METHODS OF MACHINE GUARDING
  • Safety Trip Controls:
  • Body Trip Bars
  • Hand/Arm Trip Bars
  • Tripwire Cables
  • Positioning Critical
  • Adjustment Critical
  • Maintenance Critical
  • Training Critical
  • Manual Reset Needed
  • Must Stop Machine
  • Immediately!
methods of machine guarding57

20 TON

PRESS

PRESS

ACME

PRESSES

METHODS OF MACHINE GUARDING
  • Two-Hand Control:
  • Needs Constant Pressure
  • Needs Concurrent Pressure
  • Positioning Critical
  • Adjustment Critical
  • Maintenance Critical
  • Training Important
  • Must Stop Machine
  • Immediately!
methods of machine guarding58
METHODS OF MACHINE GUARDING
  • Location/Distance Safeguarding:
  • Position Dangerous Areas of Machines So That They Are Not Assessable During Normal Operations. Examples Include:
  • Position Hazard Areas Against a Wall
  • Locate Hazards Out of Reach of Operators
  • Add Enclosures or Fences to Restrict Access
  • Design Stock Feeding Openings Away From Hazards
  • Position the Operators Control Station Away From Hazards
methods of machine guarding59
METHODS OF MACHINE GUARDING
  • Feeding and Ejection Methods:
  • Automatic Feeds - Fed From Rolls, Indexed by Machine
  • Semiautomatic Feeds - Fed by Chutes, Movable Dies, Dial Feed, Plungers, or Sliding Bolsters
  • Automatic Ejection - Air or Mechanical Ejection
  • Semiautomatic Ejection - Air or Mechanical Ejection Initiated by The Operator
  • Robotics - Perform Work Usually Performed by Operator
methods of machine guarding60
METHODS OF MACHINE GUARDING
  • Feeding and Ejection Methods:
  • Manufacturers Should Be Consulted to Determine:
  • Feeding and Ejection Add-on Options
  • Latest Technology Available
  • Best Available Technology
  • Operator Training Requirements
  • Maintenance Staff Training Requirements
  • Cost Estimates for Upgrades
  • Feasibility Assessment Information
methods of machine guarding61
METHODS OF MACHINE GUARDING
  • Miscellaneous Aids:
  • Examples of Possible Applications:
  • Awareness Barriers - (Not adequate for continuous hazards)
  • Color coding of hazard areas
  • Signage
  • Shields (i.e. splash, eye protective, thermal etc.)
  • Holding and Positioning Tools
methods of machine guarding62
METHODS OF MACHINE GUARDING
  • Guard Construction:
  • Many Machines Come With Safeguards
  • Many Older Machines Now Have Safeguards Available
  • Manufacturers Are Increasingly More Concerned With Liability
  • Companies Not Specialized in Guarding Issues
methods of machine guarding63
METHODS OF MACHINE GUARDING
  • Builder Designed and Installed Guards:
  • Usually Conform to Design and Function of Machine Better
  • Can Be Designed to Strengthen the Machine in Some Way or to Serve Some Additional Functional Purposes
methods of machine guarding64
METHODS OF MACHINE GUARDING
  • User Designed and Installed Guards:
  • Often the Only Practical Solution for Older Equipment
  • Can Be Designed and Built to Fit Unique & Changing Situations
  • Can Be Installed on Individual Dies and Feeding Mechanisms
  • Can Help Promote Safety Consciousness in the Workplace
  • Sometimes Do Not Conform As Well As “Builder Designed”
  • Depending on Talent and Resources May Be Poorly Designed
methods of machine guarding65
METHODS OF MACHINE GUARDING
  • Point-of-Operations Guards :

Defined as: “The area on a machine where work is actually performed upon the material being processed.”

  • Complicated by the Number and Complexity of Machines in Use
  • Must Fully Safeguard the Employee
  • Must Allow Production to Continue
  • Hazard Analysis Is Usually Required
  • If Poorly Designed, Built, or Installed Guards May Create a Hazard Rather Than Eliminating One.
methods of machine guarding66

300 RPM

METHODS OF MACHINE GUARDING
  • Mechanical Power Transmission Apparatus Guards:
  • The only openings usually needed are for:
  • Lubrication
  • Adjustment
  • Repair
  • Inspection
methods of machine guarding67
METHODS OF MACHINE GUARDING
  • Guard Material:
  • Under Many Circumstances, Metal Is the Best Material for Guards. Guard Framework Is Usually Made From Structural Shapes, Pipe, Bar, or Rod Stock. Filler Material Generally Is Expanded or Perforated or Solid Sheet Metal or Wire Mesh. It May Be Feasible to Use Plastic or Safety Glass Where Visibility Is Required.
  • Guards Made of Wood Generally Are Not Recommended Because of Their Flammability and Lack of Durability and Strength. However, in Areas Where Corrosive Materials Are Present, Wooden Guards May Be the Better Choice.
slide68

LOCKOUT TAGOUT OVERVIEW

29CFR - 1910 - 147

29CFR - SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS

1910 - GENERAL INDUSTRY

147 - LOCKOUT TAGOUT STANDARD

slide69

LOCKOUT TAGOUT OVERVIEW

  • TITLE - CONTROL OF HAZARDOUS ENERGY
  • SEPTEMBER 1, 1989 - FINAL RULE ISSUED
  • JANUARY 2, 1990 - FINAL RULE TOOK EFFECT
slide70

LOCKOUT TAGOUT OVERVIEW

  • Authorized Employee
  • The Person Who Locks or Tags OutMachines To Perform Servicing
  • or Maintenance.
  • Affected Employee
  • An Employee Whose Job Requires Him or Her To Operate or Use a
  • Machine or Piece of Equipment On Which Servicing or Maintenance
  • Is Being Performed.
slide71

DANGER

LOCKED

OUT

DO NOT OPERATE

This Lock/Tag may

only be removed by

NAME: _______________

DEPT : _______________

EXPECTED COMPLETION

DATE: ________________

TIME: _________________

LOCKOUT TAGOUT OVERVIEW

slide72

LOCKOUT TAGOUT OVERVIEW

  • Normal Operations

1. Covered If an Employee Must Remove or Bypass Guards or Devices

2. Covered Where Employees Are Required to Put A Body Part in a Machine Process Area

3. Covered Where Employees Are Required to Put A Body Part in a Machine Having a Danger Zone

slide73

TIPS FOR USING CONTRACTORS

  • REMEMBER, YOU CONTROL YOUR FACILITY OR AREA!
  • REVIEW THEIR PROCEDURES WITH THEM BEFORE
  • STARTING THE JOB!
  • DETERMINE THEIR SAFETY PERFORMANCE RECORD!
  • DETERMINE WHO IS IN CHARGE OF THEIR PEOPLE!
  • DETERMINE HOW THEY WILL AFFECT YOUR EMPLOYEES!
slide75

MACHINERY AND MACHINE GUARDING

SAFETY

  • MECHANICAL POWER PRESSES AND BENCH
  • GRINDERS
slide76

MECHANICAL POWER PRESSES

TWO TYPES: FULL REVOLUTION OR

PART REVOLUTION (CLUTCH DRIVEN).

NO GUARDS OR SWEEPS ALLOWED FOR

HANDFEEDING.

PRESENCE SENSING DEVICES ALLOWED ON

PART REVOLUTION ONLY.

PULLBACKS MAY BE USED, BUT REQUIRES

INSPECTION FOR EACH SHIFT, OPERATOR

OR DIE SETUP.

slide77

POWER PRESSES

  • GATES ARE RECOMMENDED FOR HANDFEEDING:
  • TYPE A FOR BOTH PART OR FULL REV PRESSES.
  • TYPE B NOT RECOMMENDED FOR FULL REV.
  • ALL PRESSES REQUIRE POINT OF OPERATION
  • SAFEGUARDING.
  • FOR NON-HANDFEED OPERATIONS, GUARDS MAY BE
  • USED.
  • GUARD OPENINGS MUST CONFORM TO 1910.217,
  • TABLE O-10
slide78

BENCH GRINDERS

WORK REST GAP MUST BE WITHIN 1/8 INCH OF WHEEL.

TONGUE GUARD GAP MUST BE WITHIN

1/4 INCH OF WHEEL.

WHEEL GUARD MUST COVER SPINDLE, END NUT

AND FLANGE.

INSPECT BLOTTER, WHEEL MOUNTING HOLE,

FLANGES, COLLET BEFORE USE.

MAKE SURE SPINDLE SPEED DOES NOT EXCEED

WHEEL RPM RATING.