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Project Archaeology is a comprehensive archaeology and heritage education program for anyone interested in learning or teaching about our nation’s rich cultural legacy and protecting it for future generations to learn from and enjoy. Mission.

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slide1

Project Archaeology is a comprehensive archaeology and

heritage education program for anyone interested in

learning or teaching about our nation’s rich cultural

legacy and protecting it for future generations

to learn from and enjoy.

mission
Mission

Project Archaeology uses archaeological inquiry to foster understanding of past and present cultures; to improve science and social studies education; and to enhance citizenship education to help preserve our shared archaeological legacy.

workshop outcomes
Workshop Outcomes
  • Participate as a learner in selected sections of Project Archaeology: Investigating Shelter
  • Learn about the interdisciplinary nature of archaeology
  • Explore how scientific inquiry and culture are integrated in archaeology; and
  • Prepare to teach Project Archaeology in your classroom.
teaching an inquiry based archaeology curriculum

Teaching an inquiry-based archaeology curriculum

The Sage on the Stage

vs.

The Guide on the Side

thinking like an archaeologist

Thinking Like an Archaeologist

Inquiry through the lens of archaeology.

project archaeology investigating shelter
Project Archaeology: Investigating Shelter

Investigating the Poplar

Forest Slave Cabin

investigating shelter database
Investigating Shelter Database
  • Kingsley Plantation (Florida, Georgia)
  • The Basin House (Colorado, Wyoming, Utah)
  • Northwest Coast Plank House (Alaska, Washington)
  • Great Basin Wickiup (Oregon, Idaho, Nevada, California)
  • Colonial Earthfast House (Maryland, Virginia, US History)
  • Tinsley Historic Farmhouse (Montana)
  • Poplar Forest Slave Cabin (Virginia, US History)
  • Rock Shelter (Colorado, Utah, Wyoming)
  • Plains Tipi (Wyoming, Montana, South Dakota)
  • Pawnee Earthlodge (Kansas, Nebraska, Iowa, Missouri)
slide9

The Structure ofInvestigating Shelter

Curriculum Development Model:

Understanding by Design

Grant Wiggins and Jay McTighe

1998 and 2005

understanding by design the basics
Enduring Understandings – what do you want students to remember 20 years from now?

Essential Questions – questions that guide the uncoverage of knowledge

Assessment – Evidence of understanding. How do you know students understand?

Plan learning events and activities – based on essential questions

Understanding by Design:The Basics
enduring understandings
Enduring Understandings
  • Understanding the past is essential for understanding the present and shaping the future.
  • Learning about cultures, past and present, is essential for living in a pluralistic society and world.
  • Archaeology is a systematic way to learn about past cultures.
  • Stewardship of archaeological sites and artifacts is everyone’s responsibility.
the structure of investigating shelter
The Structure of Investigating Shelter
  • Unit Organization
  • Lesson Organization
    • Enduring Understanding
    • Essential Question
    • What Students Will Learn
    • What Students Will Do
    • Assessment
    • Materials
    • Background Information
    • Preparing to Teach
    • Procedure (Uncover Prior Knowledge, Discover New Knowledge, Assessment, Reflect On New Knowledge)
    • Assessment Procedure

Word Bank

Misconception Alerts

slide15
Lesson One: Knowing Shelter—Knowing PeopleAll people need shelter, but shelters are different from one another.
  • Basic needs
  • Determine why shelters are different
slide17
Lesson Two:By Our Houses You Will Know UsWe can learn about people by exploring how they build and use their shelter.
  • Collect information (data) about their own homes
  • Analyze and graph the data
lesson two by our houses you will know us
Lesson Two: By Our Houses You Will Know Us
  • What do you think, “By Our Houses You Will Know Us” means?
  • If I were to visit your home tomorrow, what might I learn about you from the objects in your house?
slide19
Lesson Three:Culture EverywhereEveryone has a culture and our lives are shaped by our culture in ways we may not even see.
  • Show the different ways cultures meet basic human needs.
slide20
Conceptual Tools of ArchaeologyUsing the tools of scientific inquiry, archaeologists study shelters and learn how people lived in them.
  • Lesson Four: Observation, Inference, and Evidence
  • Lesson Five: Classification
  • Lesson Six: Context
  • Lesson Seven: Every Picture Tells a Story
lesson four observation inference and evidence1
Lesson Four: Observation, Inference, and Evidence
  • Is this an old house?
  • How long ago did people live in this house?
  • Which is a better question? Why?
lesson five classification
Lesson Five: Classification

Using the tools of scientific inquiry, archaeologists study shelters and learn how people lived in them.

lesson six context
Lesson Six: Context
  • Think of a room and the distinctive objects found in that room
  • Draw the objects on the cards (1 object on each card)
  • Pass the cards, removing one card each time the cards are passed
  • Infer the use of the room for each group
lesson six context1
Lesson Six: Context

The Old Ghost Town Dilemma

Imagine you are visiting an old ghost town in a state park with your family. Several rock buildings are still partially intact. There is a large sign by the ruins saying, “These walls are very fragile! Do not take anything, and do not walk on, or go into the ruins.” You are eating your lunch when a family arrives and ignores the sign. Kids are walking on top of the ruins and are picking up glass fragments and old nails and putting them in their pockets.

What do you do? Would you respond in any of the following ways? You might choose more than one answer. Think about what you have learned about context as you choose your answer.

  • Ask the family politely if they have read the sign.
  • Ignore them; it is really none of your business.
  • Tell them they are damaging an archaeological site.
  • Tell them they are breaking the law.
  • Say nothing and go to the Park Headquarters to find a ranger and report them.
  • Other
context assessment
Context Assessment
  • Directions:
  • Here are three drawings of the same artifact from an archaeological site.
  • Put a  over the picture that would tell you the least about the person who used this room.
  • Put a * under the picture that would tell you something about the person who used this room.
  • Put an X under the picture that would tell you the most about the person who uses this room.
  • Why can you learn more about X than  ?

______________ _______________ _________________

lesson seven every picture tells a story
Lesson Seven: Every Picture Tells a Story
  • What different kinds of scenes, events, animals, and/or people do you capture in your photographs?
  • Why do you and/or your family take photographs?
  • Do you save your photographs? Why or why not?
  • Do photographs tell a story? Can we learn something about you from photographs?
lesson eight being an archaeologist studying a shelter can help us understand people and cultures
Lesson Eight:Being an ArchaeologistStudying a shelter can help us understand people and cultures.
  • Conduct a complete archaeological investigation using authentic data
  • Observe, infer, and use evidence
  • Interpret data and make inferences
  • Read site maps and place data in spatial context
investigating the poplar forest slave cabin
Investigating the Poplar Forest Slave Cabin

What can we learn about the history and lives of enslaved people by investigating a log cabin?

lesson eight being an archaeologist
Lesson Eight: Being an Archaeologist
  • The investigation is divided into 2 sections:
    • STUDENTS: Archaeology Notebook.
    • TEACHERS: Instructions for Teachers.
  • The investigation is divided into 4 parts:
    • Introduces Mr. Jefferson
    • History of slave cabins
    • Artifacts and Quadrant maps
    • Connecting the past and present
part two history1
Part Two: History

1774 Entry

1805 Entry

part three archaeology of the poplar forest slave cabin
Part Three: Archaeology of the Poplar Forest Slave Cabin

Just as human feet leave a

footprint, shelters also a

leave a “footprint.”

part three reading the dirt
Part Three: Reading the Dirt

Calcium Density Map

Artifact Density Map

slide43
Lesson Nine:Stewardship Is Everyone’s ResponsibilityStewardship of archaeological sites and artifacts is everyone’s responsibility.
  • Evaluate laws
  • Evaluate guidelines for visiting archaeological sites
final performance of understanding archaeology under your feet

Final Performance of Understanding: Archaeology Under Your Feet!

Debate preservation of an African American site from four different perspectives.

final performance of understanding archaeology under your feet1
Final Performance of Understanding: Archaeology Under Your Feet!
  • City Council meeting
    • No interrupting
    • Be brief and to the point
    • Speeches should not exceed 2 minutes
  • Each group presents
  • Groups may respond after everyone presents
teaching scientific inquiry and culture understanding through archaeology

Teaching Scientific Inquiry and Culture Understanding through Archaeology

Revisiting the Enduring Understandings