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What is meant by the Americas? / The New World. Please turn in your Pocahontas essay & o utline w/ attached rubric. Warm-Up. What does the cartoon tell us about the discovery of the Americas? Who really discovered Americas?. Warm-Up. What is America? Who defined what America is?.

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what is meant by the americas the new world

What is meant by the Americas? / The New World

Please turn in your Pocahontas essay & outline w/ attached rubric

warm up
Warm-Up
  • What does the cartoon tell us about the discovery of the Americas?
  • Who really discovered Americas?
warm up1
Warm-Up
  • What is America?
  • Who defined what America is?
a homogeneous america
A Homogeneous America
  • At face value, the Americas seem homogenous…
    • All countries share the same alphabet
    • All countries are ex-colonies
    • All countries achieved independence at roughly the same time
    • All countries have Christianity as the prevailing religion
a heterogeneous america
A Heterogeneous America
  • The reality, however, is more complicated…
    • With a partner, create a list of 10 things that separate/differ between the countries of the Americas
case study dominant neighbors
Case Study: Dominant Neighbors
  • Canada and New Zealand suffer from similar fates: both are former British colonies that are often compared or eclipsed by their larger neighbors, the United States and Australia
    • Why then, are generalizations made about these two countries?
    • Why are they seen as devoid of their own identities by outsiders?
    • Are there other countries that are treated in a similar manner?
should the united states dominate a regional study course
Should the United States dominate a regional study course?
  • To some the answer is unequivocally yes…
    • Let’s Take a Look…
ib command terms
IB COMMAND TERMS
  • To what extent = asks you to consider the merits or otherwise of an argument or concept. Opinions and conclusions should be presented clearly and supported with appropriate evidence and sound argument.
quickwrite usa usa usa vs usa canada peru etc
QUICKWRITE:USA! USA! USA! vs.USA!, CANADA!, PERU!, etc.
  • Please fully respond to the following prompt…
    • To what extent should the United States dominate a regional study course such as IB History of the Americas?
    • Please underline your thesis statement
for homework
For Homework:

Complete the Map of the Americas

Be sure to include all countries, oceans, seas, and the Mississippi and Amazon Rivers

warm up quickwrite
Warm-Up: Quickwrite
  • Based on what you have read, seen, and heard, why do you believe that European society was more likely to explore the Americas than the other way around?
simple map of subsistence methods in the pre columbus americas
Simple map of subsistence methods in the pre-Columbus Americas
  • hunter gatherers
  • simple farming societies
  • complex farming societies (tribal chiefdoms or civilization)
columbus new world
Columbus’ “New World”

Columbus’s first voyage, 1492

america before columbus
America Before Columbus

Columbus reaches the Americas…

Take notes on…

  • The “dramatized” first interaction between the two “sides” (realistic or unrealistic?)
  • The notion of “give and take” between the two “sides” (who gets the better end of the deal)
columbian exchange contest
“Columbian Exchange Contest”
  • With a partner, identify the “winners” and “losers” in the “Columbian Exchange Contest”
  • Determine which area (Africa, Europe, or the New World) benefited most from the Columbian Exchange
  • Determine the one element (other than disease) that had the most profound impact on Africa, Europe, and the New World
  • Compare the experiences of these different areas of the world in a whole-class discussion
soapstone reading strategy guide
SOAPSTone: Reading Strategy Guide
  • SPEAKER—Who is the voice who tells the story?
  • OCCASION—What is the time and the place of the piece – the context that the writing to happen?
  • AUDIENCE—Who is the audience – the groups of readers for which this piece was intended for?
  • PURPOSE—Why was this text written?
  • SUBJECT—What is the general topic, content, and ideas contained in the text?
  • Tone—What is the attitude of the author?
comparing perspectives
Comparing Perspectives
  • Read Juan Gines Sepulveda… (1547) [pgs. 3-4]; CompleteSOAPSTone questions and answer…
  • ReadBartolome de Las Casas… (1552) [pgs. 4-6]; CompleteSOAPSTone questions and answer…
comparing perspectives1
Comparing Perspectives
  • What differences does Sepulveda emphasize between Europeans (especially Spaniards) and the Indians?
  • On what grounds does Sepulveda assert the superiority of European culture?
  • How are de Las Casas views of the Indians different from those of Sepulveda?
  • What ideas did the two debaters share?
warm up america before columbus
Warm-Up:America Before Columbus
  • While watching, answer the guiding questions and consider…
    • To what extent was the discovery/exploration of the “New World” considered a success story?
map study colonial vs modern america
Map Study: Colonial vs. Modern America
  • Consider the two maps and answer the related questions…
    • The given map shows European colonies in the Americas around 1763
    • Your self-created map of the Americas should reflect the present day borders / countries
political control lers in the new world
Political control(lers) in the New World
  • Administration and government of the British and Iberian colonies ≈ expression of those of the motherlands
political control lers in the new world spaniards
Political control(lers) in the New World: Spaniards
  • Reflected the centralized, absolutist regimes of their home countries
    • From 1516 to 1700, Spain and the Spanish Empire were ruled by the Habsburg monarchy
political control lers in the new world spaniards1
Political control(lers) in the New World: Spaniards
  • Had an extensive body of laws deals with the administration of the new world = complex bureaucratic and legal system
political control lers in the new world spaniards2
Political control(lers) in the New World: Spaniards
  • “Decision makers” were Spanish-born and referred to as peninsulares
  • Creoles were virtually excluded from administrative tasks until…
    • Cabildo(town councils) administrative posts began to be sold to the highest bidder in the late 17th century
political control lers in the new world portuguese
Political control(lers) in the New World: Portuguese
  • Much like the Spanish Empire, high developed, costly bureaucracies emerged
    • Thwarts local economic initiative
    • Thwarts political experimentation
political control lers in the new world portuguese1
Political control(lers) in the New World: Portuguese
  • Unlike the Spanish colonies, Portuguese rule was relatively relaxed in Brazil
    • No colonial administration until the 18th century
political control lers in the new world english
Political control(lers) in the New World: English
  • Represents an extension of the English Parliament
    • Based on common law
    • Governance was an administrative and judicial system
political control lers in the new world english1
Political control(lers) in the New World: English
  • English colonies had the power of self-government
    • Representative assemblies voted in by popular support
economic systems of the new world
Economic systems of the New World
  • Colonial economy directly tied to mercantilism
economic systems of the new world english
Economic systems of the New World:English
  • British begin passing regulatory laws to benefit their own economy
    • Colonies not allowed to compete with Britain in manufacturing
    • Navigation Acts—protectionist laws
economic systems of the new world english1
Economic systems of the New World:English
  • Many colonists defied the restrictions of the Navigation Acts and British government was often lax in enforcement
    • Leads to salutary neglect
economic systems of the new world spaniards
Economic systems of the New World:Spaniards
  • Unlike the English, Spanish mercantilism was tightly enforced…
    • Monopoly ports on either side of the Atlantic oversaw the collection of taxes
    • Transatlantic trade mostly confined to convoys
  • Low supplies of manufactured goods leads to price inflation
economic systems of the new world spaniards1
Economic systems of the New World:Spaniards
  • Profitability problem…
    • raw materials a small % of cargo (gold/silver much higher %)
    • Spain sent the raw materials to foreign countries for production of finished goods
economic systems of the new world spaniards2
Economic systems of the New World:Spaniards
  • Intra-continental trade develops
    • Emergence of new classes of elites but also downtrodden
social systems of the new world english
Social Systems of the New World:English
  • Usually came in family groups or even as whole communities
  • Social structure largely based on (economic) class
social systems of the new world spanish
Social Systems of the New World:Spanish
  • Spanish emigrants did not come as family units
    • Mostly single men came over as soldiers, officials, or laborers
    • Much denser indigenous population (and lack of family units) leads to more intermarriage and interracial relationships
social systems of the new world spanish1
Social Systems of the New World:Spanish
  • Racial classifications from the basis of maintaining class and power distinctions
    • Society has a highlycomplex racial make-up
role of religion in the new world
Role of Religion in the New World
  • Americas were colonized by Europeans who wanted to extend the influence of Christianity
    • Spanish America dominated by the Roman Catholic Church
    • British colonies were mostly Protestant
role of religion in the new world spaniards
Role of Religion in the New World:Spaniards
  • Catholic Church played a significant and vital role in the colonies
    • Education
    • Culture
    • Evangelization of native population
    • Corporate owner of land, real estate, and capital
role of religion in the new world english
Role of Religion in the New World:English
  • Plurality of faith was the norm
  • What people believed depended on where they lived
    • New England colonists were largely Puritans
    • Middle colonists were a mixture of religions including Quakers, Catholics, Lutherans, and Jews
    • Southern colonists had a mixture of religions including Baptists and Anglicans
questions comments
Questions? Comments?
  • Typically, after we complete a topic of study (see unit plan), the PPT will be made available on my Weebly following the completion of the “section”
  • But…
    • Take good notes during lectures utilizing techniques like summarizing and paraphrasing to help you “get it” the first time
introduction to internal assessment
Introduction to Internal Assessment
  • What is an IA?
    • A written investigation of a historical concept(s), event(s), or situation(s) which has been narrowed and made as specific as possible.
introduction to internal assessment1
Introduction to Internal Assessment

Skills which need to be understood and conveyed in your investigation:

  • How to make strong arguments.
  • The tools of historiography.
  • The difference between narrative data and analysis of data.
  • Should provide the reader with an understanding of your appreciation for the limits of historical “knowledge.”
how should this investigation be organized
How should this investigation be organized?

A: Plan of the Investigation (3 Marks)

B: Summary of Evidence (6 Marks)

Narrative Information ONLY - frequently cited

C: Evaluation of Sources (5 Marks)

Analysis of any two sources used for B

D: Analysis (6 Marks)

Analysis of the information in section B

E: Conclusion (2 Marks)

A clear answer to your question

List of Sources and Word Limit (3 Marks)

TOTAL 25 Marks

history ia title
History IA Title

1. Titles should start out with the general topic: “An investigation….”

2. Titles should end with a more specific question.

Example:

An investigation into German social history:How successfully did Hitler promote the ideal of the family in the Third Reich?

choosing an appropriate title will lead to an appropriate investigation
Choosing an appropriate titlewill lead to an appropriate investigation

Which title is probably easier to investigate and discuss effectively with the 2000 word limit? Why?

TITLE A:

An investigation into African warfare:

Why did the British Army struggle Southern Africa during the 1870s?

TITLE B:

An investigation into African colonial warfare:

To what extent was the defeat of the British by the Zulu at Isandlwna in 1879 due to the mistakes made by Lord Chelmsford?

sample title page
SAMPLE TITLE PAGE:

An Investigation into Soviet Domestic Policies:

To what extent was Stalin’s First Five Year Plan Successful?

John Smith

Candidate Number: 734-0134

History Internal Assessment

January 24th, 2013

Word Count:: 1956

section a the plan of investigation 100 150 words
Section A: The Plan of Investigation(100-150 words)

Essentially there are three steps you must cover in Section A:

  • Brief background/contextual information is provided about the importance of topic or situation.
  • The specific thesis question and topic of investigation are clearly presented. (This can be presented at the top of the section!)
  • The methods/strategies and/or scope of investigation are clearly explained to the audience.

All of this in ONE paragraph!

section a the plan of investigation suggestions
Section A: The Plan of InvestigationSuggestions
  • Be concise
  • Clearly show how you are going to tackle or address the investigation. In other words, what methods you will use to argue your thesis effectively.
  • Please don’t just say you are going to “summarize the evidence, evaluate sources and analyze to support my conclusion.” .
  • Be objective - don’t exaggerate! For instance, don’t say “it will be proven that….”
phase one topic selection preliminary thesis
Phase One: Topic Selection & Preliminary Thesis
  • Narrow down your topic to a specific question/area of investigation
  • Choose a working title that may be changed/revised later
  • Obtain sufficient resources for your investigation
  • Read widely around the area of study and write down resources used
  • Draft a working thesis in the form of a question
  • Take notes from your chosen resources, include exact references
  • Due Date: 9/17 (A) & 9/18 (B)