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  1. Welcome

    On a sheet of paper, respond to the following question in at least a paragraph. Where were you at this time last year? Describe yourself and how you have changed since last year. (Think deeper than…well, I used to have long hair, but now it’s short.)
  2. Agenda Syllabus Graduation Project Getting to Know You Activity Student Survey Reflection
  3. Graduation Project Lab Day tomorrow Cover Page Title Page Resumé Table of contents Academic Advisor Form Due January 31 Product Approval Form Due February 7
  4. Getting to Know You Think – look over the questions. Pick one or two you want to talk about. Think about how you would answer it. Pair - with someone sitting next to you, discuss the questions you picked and talk about them. Share – with the class
  5. Student Survey Go to my webpage Click on English IV in the left column Click on the survey link Answer the questions completely and honestly
  6. What Type of Learner are You? Visual Auditory Read-Write Kinesthetic
  7. Visual They tend to be fast talkers. They exhibit impatience and have a tendency to interrupt. They use words and phrases that evoke visual images. They learn by seeing and visualizing. Auditory They speak slowly and tend to be natural listeners. They think in a linear manner. They prefer to have things explained to them verbally rather than to read written information. They learn by listening and verbalizing. Kinesthetic They tend to be slow talkers. They tend to be slow to make decisions. They use all their senses to engage in learning. They learn by doing and solving real-life problems. They like hands-on approaches to things and learn through trial and error. Read-Write They prefer for information to be displayed in writing, such as lists of ideas. They emphasize text-based input and output. They enjoy reading and writing in all forms.
  8. Reflection Where will you be at this time next year? Describe how you think your life will be different. If you don’t think it will be different, explain why.
  9. January 24

    What are your goals for this class this semester? What is your plan to accomplish these goals? Who is going to support you?
  10. Agenda Table of Contents Title Page Cover Page Resumé
  11. January 27

    What is a hero?
  12. Agenda Hero Reaction Guide Anglo History Context academic vocab Reading Beowulf – pg 42 Academic Vocab T-chart to interpret and analyze text Epic Hero graphic organizer to support claims in analysis Final Reflection
  13. Anglo-Saxons – What you need to know Romans leave Britain Angles, Saxons, and Jutes invade Bloody conflicts, ignorance, violence, barbarism Angle-land Fatalistic and grim world view Vikings invade The appeal of Christianity
  14. Anglo-Saxon Virtues Bravery Loyalty Generosity Friendship
  15. Academic Vocab Alliteration Caesura Assonance Scops Dichotomy Kenning Epic poetry Epic Hero
  16. Alliteration Repetition of stressed sounds, particularly consonants from the beginning of words or syllables. …hoping to kill anyone he could trap on this trip to high Herot. …the struggling great bodies beating at its beautiful walls … …gold-covered boards grating as Grendel and Beowulf battled across them.
  17. Caesura A pause dividing each line, with each part having two accented syllables to help maintain the rhythm of the line A powerful monster, living down In the darkness, growled in pain, impatient As day after day the music rang Loud in that hall, the harp’s rejoicing
  18. Assonance Repetition of vowel sounds … lying in waiting, hidden in mist, invisibly following them … And wondering what the bravest of warriors could do. And sometimes they sacrificed to the … sung of the ancient beginnings of us all, recalling the Almighty making the earth …
  19. Scops Poet singers
  20. Dichotomy Opposites on the same spectrum Light/Dark Male/Female Good/Evil
  21. Kenning Metaphor - figure of speech in which a word or phrase that ordinarily means one thing is applied to another thing to suggest a likeness between the two Compound – raven-haired, ring-marked Possessive – heaven’s high arch, her evil skin Prepositional – frozen with fear, winters of grief, running to his doom
  22. Epic Long narrative poem Praised heroic warriors Recited by scops Instilled cultural pride History lesson Moral sermon
  23. Epic Hero Glorified On a Quest Ethical Strong
  24. Epic Hero?
  25. Beowulf – What you need to know Oldest surviving epic poem 750? Written in Old English Originally untitled Originally chanted Author unknown
  26. Beowulf Cheat Sheet Herot – mead-hall King Hrothgar – king of the Danes Grendel - monster Healfdane – Hrothgar’s father Higlac – Beowulf’s uncle, king of the Geats Wulfgar - herald Edgetho – Beowulf’s father Wiglaf – Beowulf’s wing man
  27. T-Chart
  28. January 28

    What does evil mean to you? Write your own definition of the word and provide some examples of real-life monsters.
  29. Agenda Reading Beowulf – pg 50 Academic Vocab T-chart to interpret and analyze text Epic Hero graphic organizer to support claims in analysis Final Reflection Homework: Cover page, title page, table of contents, and resumé
  30. Exit Slip Summarize what you will take away from class today in one short sentence – 10 words or less.
  31. January 31

    Who would you consider a modern day epic hero? Why?
  32. Agenda Finish reading Beowulf – pg 66 Revisit Hero Reaction Guide Modern Day Epic Hero Project Homework Due Tuesday: Cover page, title page, table of contents, and resumé Academic Advisor Form
  33. Products Connection to and extension of research Should reflect 15 hours of work Must be adequately documented with photographs, logs, letters, reflective journal entries, and other forms of documentation Must involve a community component Ideas Write a story Teach a lesson Create a website Interview a professional
  34. February 3

    The Anglo-Saxon virtues are bravery, loyalty, generosity, and friendship. Which do you think is the most important and why?
  35. Agenda Reading “The Seafarer” – pg 104 Analyzing lines of the poem by paraphrasing, visualizing, and clarifying. Finishing Modern Day Epic Hero Project Final Reflection Homework Due Tomorrow: Cover page, title page, table of contents, and resumé
  36. Imagery Find images that convey a mood of isolation.
  37. Poem Analysis
  38. Reflection What is your own definition of an epic hero?
  39. February 4

    Describe the most interesting person you have ever met?
  40. Agenda Academic Vocab Intro to the Middle Ages and Chaucer Reading The Canterbury Tales Prologue - pg 144 Middle English Prologue Extra Credit Reading and Comparing Prologue Pilgrims Knight pg 146/Squire pg 147 Parson pg 157/Nun pg 148 Intro to Modern Pilgrim Assignment Homework: Product Approval Form
  41. Academic Vocab Frame story – joins one or more stories within a story Prologue – intro to a literary work; can establish setting and give background Medieval literature – ballads, romances, allegories, and moral tales; most were religious – but some dealt with love, exemplary life and behavior, and political and social issues Ballads – narrative songs (tragic love, domestic conflicts, disastrous wars, shipwrecks, sensational crimes, exploits of outlaws, celebrated historical events, romantic heroes, revenge, rebellion, envy, betrayal, and superstition) Allegories – narrative in which something concrete represents something abstract (Ex. Cowardly Lion; Animal Farm, Pilgrim’s Progress)
  42. Academic Vocab Iambic pentameter – line of poetry with 5 meters, or 10 syllables, patter in unstressed followed by stressed syllable Characterization - techniques an author uses to develop characters including description of the character’s appearance; character’s speech, thoughts, and actions; responses of other characters to the character; and direct comments from the narrator. Satire - a literary work that ridicules its subject in order to make a comment or criticism about it Dramatic irony – reader knows more than the character Verbal irony – someone says one thing but means another Situational irony – what is expected to happen is not what actually happens
  43. Who’s Who in the Middle Ages God – Church King Lords Vassals Knights Ladies Serfs
  44. Peasant What They Ate Lord Wine or ale White bread Deer, boar, and rabbits Salmon and trout Breakfast of white bread, meat, and wine or ale Dinner (lunch) usually consisted of many courses Supper similar to dinner but may include pigeon pie, woodcock, or sturgeon Water, milk, or ale Rye bread Mutton Hedgehogs and squirrels Black Pudding Dace, grayling, and gudgeon Breakfast of bread and ale Dinner of dark bread and cheese – meat rarely included Supper of vegetable pottage and bread – lucky to have meat
  45. Chaucer – What you need to know Father of English Literature First to write in the vernacular Member of Parliament Knight of the shire Middle English Modern
  46. Prologue Pilgrims
  47. Reflection In 1809, the English poet and artist William Blake made the following observation: “Chaucer’s pilgrims are the characters which compose all ages and nations…Some of the names or titles are altered by time, but the characters themselves forever remain unaltered.” Do you agree or disagree that Chaucer’s characters seem timeless and universal? Support your opinion with details from the text and your own experiences.
  48. February 5

    It has been said that “Money is the root of all evil.” Do you agree/disagree? Why?
  49. Agenda Analyze modern depiction of greed Read Pardoner’s Description - pg 162 Read Pardoner’s Tale – pg 170 Complete plot activity Watch Pardoner’s Tale Compare/Contrast Pardoner’s Tale to modern depiction Final Reflection Homework: Product Form Due Friday Modern Pilgrim Assignment Due Monday with Test
  50. Modern Pilgrim Assignment Choose a modern day pilgrim Decide how they should act Decide how they should be critiqued Describe them – include physical aspects as well Write 20 lines of rhyming couplets Due with your test on Monday – worth 15 points
  51. The Dark Knight The Pardoner’s Tale
  52. Reflection Why is the theme of the Pardoner’s Tale still being repeated today? Describe another source (TV show, song, book, etc) where you have seen this theme repeated. (Casino, Jerry Maguire, Slumdog Millionaire, Do You Want to be a Millionaire, The Lorax, A Christmas Carol, “Billionaire,” “Bills-Bills-Bills,” “Mo’ Money, Mo’ Problems”)
  53. February 6

    Would you rather spend the rest of your life with someone who is ugly/faithful or beautiful/unfaithful? Explain why.
  54. Agenda Decide a class goal Read Wife’s Description - pg 156 Read Wife’s Tale – pg 184 Watch Wife’s Tale Answer viewing and analysis questions Discuss theme questions in small groups Final Reflection Homework: Product Form Modern Pilgrim Assignment
  55. Modern Pilgrim Assignment Choose a modern day pilgrim Decide how they should act Decide how they should be critiqued Describe them – include physical aspects as well Write 20 lines of rhyming couplets Due with your test on Monday – worth 15 points
  56. Wife of Bath Viewing and Analysis Wife of Bath What was the knight’s crime? What was his punishment? According to the wife, what do women want? How do you know the knight learned his lesson? Did the knight get what he deserved? What is the moral of the story?
  57. Reflection What Women Want What connection can you make between the wife’s tale and the movie clip? What is the meaning?
  58. February 7

    What code do you live by? Gratitude Caring Understanding Humor Diligence Integrity Commitment Acceptance Generosity Compassion Enthusiasm Courage Discretion Sincere Humble Discipline Focus Gentleness Honesty Reliability Hope Moderation Perseverance Flexibility Respect Wisdom Spontaneity Faith Confidence Thankfulness Devotion Grace Persistence Empathy Tolerance
  59. Agenda Grammar Diagnostic Review Pilgrim Characterization Chart Test Study Guide Homework: Modern Pilgrim Assignment
  60. Modern Pilgrim Assignment Choose a modern day pilgrim Decide how they should act Decide how they should be critiqued Describe them – include physical aspects as well Write 20 lines of rhyming couplets Due with your test on Monday – worth 15 points
  61. Schoology 2nd: HWJVT-K6VBR 3rd: 9W4XF-ZKTS8
  62. February 10

    Test Today. You will have a few minutes to look over your notes. Use your time wisely or lose it. I will collect the extra credit study guides before beginning the test.
  63. Day Book Check Jan 24 – Your goals this semester Jan 27 – Beowulf Academic Vocab Feb 3 – Analysis of Seafarer Feb 4 – Pilgrim Chart Feb 5 – Pardoner Storyboard
  64. Pilgrims – Extra Credit Complete the sheet on the stool based on one of the following pilgrims and receive extra credit. Yeoman – pg 147 Monk – pg 149 Plowman – pg 158 Miller – pg 159 Summoner – 161 Friar – pg 150 Oxford Cleric – pg 152
  65. February 11

    Today’s Agenda Resumé Tips Finish Test/Complete pilgrim characterization chart Define AcademicVocab for new unit Begin Macbeth Journal
  66. Pilgrims – Extra Credit Complete the sheet on the stool based on one of the following pilgrims and receive extra credit. Yeoman – pg 147 Monk – pg 149 Plowman – pg 158 Miller – pg 159 Summoner – 161 Friar – pg 150 Oxford Cleric – pg 152
  67. New Unit Academic Vocab Sonnet Octave Sestet Quatrains Couplet Petrarchan Sonnet Shakespearean Sonnet Iambic Pentameter Tragedy Tragic hero Tragic flaw Antagonist Theme Comic relief Blank verse Soliloquy Aside Dramatic irony Foreshadowing Situational irony Metaphor Mood Imagery Motifs Symbols Inverted sentences Paradox
  68. Macbeth Journal 1 Write a full page. What is your highest ambition? What are you willing to do to get there?
  69. February 17Agree/Disagree

    1. Behind every great man is a great woman. 2. Sometimes it is necessary to do something wrong to get what you want. 3. What goes around comes around. 4. There are circumstances or events that justify murder. 5. Success is worth any price. 6. One mistake always leads to another. 7. A guilty conscious will destroy you. 8. Greed and ambition are the same.
  70. Agenda Review Test and Complete Objective Tracking The Globe England in Shakespeare’s Time Summarizing Context Vocabulary Search Progress Check One DUE Monday, February 24th
  71. Shakespeare Quotes "Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears; I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him". Quote (Julius Caesar Act III, Scene II). "But, for my own part, it was Greek to me". - Julius Caesar Quote (Act I, Scene II). "To be, or not to be: that is the question". Hamlet quote (Act III, Sc. I). "This above all: to thine own self be true" Hamlet quote (Act I, Sc. III). "Though this be madness, yet there is method in 't." Haml "Good Night, Good night! Parting is such sweet sorrow, that I shall say good night till it be morrow." Romeo and Juliet ( Quote Act II, Scene II). "What's in a name? That which we call a rose by any other name would smell as sweet". Romeo and Juliet ( Quote Act II, Sc. II). "‘T’is neither here nor there." Othello Quote (Act IV, Scene III). "I will wear my heart upon my sleeve for daws to peck at". Othello Quote (Act I, Scene I).et quote (Act II, Scene II).
  72. England in Shakespeare’s Time Work in your groups to: Read and Summarize each section of the handout Skim and Identify 4 instances of unfamiliar vocabulary in Macbeth Act I – page 350 Cite page #, line, define, and explain in context Group 1 = Scene 1 & 2 Group 2 = Scene 3 Group 3 = Scene 4 Group 4 = Scene 5 Group 5 = Scene 6 & 7
  73. February 18

    Spend 10 minutes looking up your academic vocab words, if you have not yet completed that task. The definitions should be in your daybook. If you have completed that task, use this time to finish the context vocabulary assignment we started yesterday. Each group should write their words and definitions on the board.
  74. Agenda Finish Context Vocabulary Search and Share Out Review England in Shakespeare’s Time Summarizing Macbeth Cast of Characters Read Act 1 Scene 1 pg 350 Compare/Contrast with Audio and Visual Productions Continue Reading Act I Progress Check One DUE Monday, February 24th
  75. England in Shakespeare’s Time Work in your groups to: Read and Summarize each section of the handout Skim and Identify 4 instances of unfamiliar vocabulary in Macbeth Act I – page 350 Cite page #, line, define, and explain in context Group 1 = Scene 1 & 2 Group 2 = Scene 3 Group 3 = Scene 4 Group 4 = Scene 5 Group 5 = Scene 6 & 7
  76. Macbeth Cast of Characters Macbeth - a Scottish general and the thane of Glamis Lady Macbeth - Macbeth’s wife Banquo - a general King Duncan - good King of Scotland Macduff - a Scottish nobleman Malcolm - son of Duncan Hecate - goddess of witchcraft Fleance - Banquo’s son Lennox - a Scottish nobleman. Ross - a Scottish nobleman. Porter - drunken doorman of Macbeth’s castle. Lady Macduff - Macduff’s wife Donalbain - Duncan’s son and Malcolm’s younger brother.
  77. Pg 350 - Readers Narrator First Witch Second Witch Third Witch Duncan Malcolm Captain Lady Macbeth Messenger Lennox Ross Macbeth Banquo
  78. Act I Scene 1 Audio Older Movie Newer Movie Movie with a twist
  79. February 19

    Pick one of the following words and explain how it could lead to a theme in Macbeth. Make a prediction on what you think will happen based on what we have read already. Ambition, Power, Prophecy, Guilt, Supernatural, Deception
  80. Agenda Context Vocabulary Quiz Next Week Continue Reading Act 1 Analyze Act 1 Quotes Complete Act 1 Summary Subject Verb Agreement Notes and Practice Progress Check One DUE Monday, February 24th
  81. Pg 360 - Readers Duncan Lady Macbeth Messenger Macbeth Banquo
  82. Reflection: online Which character or characters should fear Macbeth’s ambition? Why?
  83. Subject Verb Agreement 1. Subjects joined by and use a plural verb. She and her friends are going to the mall. 2. Singular subjects joined by orornor use a singular verb. The book or the pen is on the desk. 3. When a singular and plural subject are joined by orornor, the verb should agree with the closest subject. The boy or his friends run every day. 4. Do not be misled by a phrase between a subject and verb. Cross it out and make the subject agree with the verb. One of the boxes is open. 5. Each, Each one, either, neither, everyone, everybody, anybody, anyone, somebody, someone, and no one are singular – always – and take a singular verb. Everybody knows Mr. Smith.
  84. Subject Verb Agreement His friends or the boy run/runs every day. The people who listen to that music is/are few. Either is/are correct. Paul and Gary has/have baseball practice. Each one gives/give his all. Elaine or Sophia sings/sing at the home games. The team captain, as well as his players, is/are anxious.
  85. February 20

    Would Macbeth have considered murdering Duncan if the witches had not spoken to him? Explain your answer.
  86. Agenda Identify and Define unfamiliar vocabulary in Act II Read Act II pg 368 Analyze Act II Quotes Complete Act II Summary Subject Verb Agreement Notes and Practice Progress Check One DUE Monday, February 24th
  87. Context Vocabulary Act II – pg 368 On a sheet of paper to turn in TODAY Skim each scene of Act II and Identify 1 instance of unfamiliar vocabulary for each scene Cite page # Cite line Define the word Explain the line now that you know the definition *Do not use the words already defined for you in the margins. Example -Ravishing pg 370 line 54 -“With Tarquin’s ravishing strides, towards his design moves like a ghost.” -delightful, entrancing -His moves are entrancing because he is almost invisible as he moves towards his goal.
  88. Act II pg 368 - Readers Banquo Fleance Macbeth Lady Macbeth Porter Macduff Lennox Donalbain
  89. Reflection - online Can Macbeth do anything to stop his ambition?
  90. Subject Verb Agreement Nouns such as civics, mathematics, dollars*, measles, and news use singular verbs. The news is on at six. Five dollars is a lot of money. Nouns such as scissors, tweezers, and shears use plural verbs. The scissors are dull.
  91. Subject Verb Agreement 3. Sentences beginning with there is or there are, the subject follows the verb. a. There are many questions. b. There is a question. 4. Collective nouns are words that imply more than one person but are considered singular and take a singular verb – group, team, committee, class, and family. a. The team travels on Friday. b. The committee decides what to purchase.
  92. Subject Verb Agreement 5. Expressions such as with, together with, including, accompanied by, in addition to, or as well do not change the number of the subject. a. The President, accompanied by his wife, is traveling to India. b. All of the books, including yours, are in that box.
  93. February 21

    When people do the wrong thing knowing it is wrong, can they stay the same or are they changed? How will not getting caught affect them psychologically? How are Macbeth and Lady Macbeth affected?
  94. Agenda Analyze Act II Quotes Complete Act II Summary View Uncovering Shakespeare Macbeth Macbeth Journal 2 Online Reflections Progress Check One DUE Monday, February 24th
  95. Macbeth Journal 2 Think about a time when you have done or said something that “snowballed” to a point where you had no control over the situation. Write about this time and consider what you may or may not have learned from it. (This might be someone else you know if it didn’t happen to you.)
  96. February 24

    Which characters seem to be the antagonists, preparing to move against the tragic hero, Macbeth?
  97. Agenda Progress Check One DUE Today Online Reflections DUE by Wednesday Subject Verb Agreement Practice Identify and Define unfamiliar vocabulary in Act III Read Act III and paraphrase scenes with a partner
  98. Subject Verb Agreement Notes Plural indefinite pronouns always take plural verbs: Several, Few, Both, Many Both of my parents are from Florida. Many are coming to the concert. Some indefinite pronouns can be either singular or plural: Some, Any, None, All, Most. Look to the antecedent to determine whether it is singular or plural. Some of the test was easy. Some of the tests in English are easy.
  99. Subject Verb Agreement Practice The class is/are reading Macbeth. Seven dollars is/are sitting on the table. Saturday, in addition to Sunday, is/are my favorite day of the week. Civics requires/require a prerequisite. Each of the boys (do/does) his own cooking. There is/are many students working in the media center. The tweezers is/are sharp. The people across the hall, as well as the man in the next apartment, (has/have) lived in the building since the mid-1980s. Either of these videos (is/are) suitable for a four-year-old. Several of the students (has/have) transferred. All of the exercises (seem/seems) simple.
  100. Context Vocabulary Act III – pg 382 On a sheet of paper to turn in TODAY Skim each scene of Act III and Identify unfamiliar vocabulary Cite page # and line # Define the word Explain the line now that you know the definition *Do not use the words already defined for you in the margins. *2 words must come from Scenes 1-3; 2 must come from Scenes 4-6 Example -Ravishing pg 370 line 54 -“With Tarquin’s ravishing strides, towards his design moves like a ghost.” -delightful, entrancing -His moves are entrancing because he is almost invisible as he moves towards his goal.
  101. Act III 5 groups – Read Act III together As you read, Paraphrase/Summarize each scene using dialogue and narration Basically, you are putting together a production that will take about a minute or two per scene. Be prepared to perform tomorrow
  102. Reflection How would you prefer to read this play? Individually, partners, small groups, whole class? Original text, Modern text, Audio Version? We have read in a variety of ways. Which suited you best and why? Explain which you prefer and why? Do you have a suggestion for a different way? Not reading it is not an option.
  103. February 25

    A tragic hero comes to ruin due to 1) an error in judgment or 2) a weakness in character. Which of these two factors applies better to Macbeth? Explain.
  104. Agenda Subject Verb Agreement Practice Finish work on Act III mini productions Review Act III quotes and summary Discuss Act One – Three Questions in groups Macbeth Journal 3
  105. Subject Verb Agreement Practice A jacket or a sweater (is/are) warm enough for tonight. Either the singer or the musicians (is/are) off-key. Here (is/are) the books you reserved. The team (has/have) won the semifinals. Twenty-seven dollars (is/are) all we have raised so far. To illustrate books for young readers require/requires a vivid imagination. One junior, as well as four seniors, has/have been invited to attend the Milford Youth Council next month. A few in my class help/helps the coach set up the bleachers. None of the people in the theater was/were sitting in the first two rows. Public relations and advertising is/are exciting but often stressful work.
  106. Macbeth Journal 3 CSI, Law and Order, NCIS – these are just a few of the popular TV shows that involve solving a mystery or finding a solution to a problem. Why are mysteries so popular?
  107. February 26

    According to one definition, knowledge is power. When might this be true? When might it not be true? Provide concrete examples from the play that prove and disprove this definition of “knowledge.”
  108. Agenda Subject Verb Agreement Practice Read Act IV – pg 400 Review Act IV quotes and complete summary Reflection
  109. Subject Verb Agreement Practice Look back over your notes. Pick two rules to use. Write out a sentence following each rule. Leave the two verb choices (singular/plural) in the sentences. Under each sentence explain the correct answer. Do this in your daybook – notebook – English binder.
  110. Act IV pg 400 Narrator First Witch Second Witch Third Witch Hecate Macbeth First Apparition Second Apparition Third Apparition Lennox Lady Macduff Ross Son Messenger Murderer Malcolm Macduff Doctor
  111. Reflection What seems the most tragic aspect of the play?
  112. February 27

    Without the witches’ predictions, do you think Macbeth and Lady Macbeth would have been satisfied with their place in life? Explain why.
  113. Agenda Subject Verb Agreement Practice Discuss Acts One – Four in small groups Read Act V – pg 418 Review Act V quotes and complete summary Reflection
  114. Subject Verb Agreement Practice Write five sentences using the following criteria. All sentences must use a present tense verb. Use “None” as the subject. Use “Either,Or” at the beginning of the sentence. One subject must be singular. The other must be plural. Start your sentence with “Tomorrow, as well as three other days this week…” Use “All” as the subject. Start your sentence with “Each of my friends…”
  115. Act One Questions Who is the tragic hero? What makes him the tragic hero? What tragic decision does he make? What becomes Macbeth’s primary ambition after he hears the witches’ prophesy? What event strengthens that ambition? In which scene does Macbeth begin to think of murdering Duncan? How do you know? Reread the aside in scene 3, lines 153-155. What does Macbeth ask Banquo to do? How does the request reflect Macbeth’s feelings? What does Banquo’s response indicate about him?
  116. Act Two Questions What actions result from the Macbeths’ ambition? How is their ambition fulfilled? Why does Macbeth say the things he does during the “dagger” soliloquy? Reread Scene 1, lines 61-63. What do these lines suggest about Macbeth’s hard-heartedness in murdering Duncan? Explain. In Scene 2, lines 31-32, what does Lady Macbeth tell Macbeth not to do? What does her statement reveal about her? What might it foreshadow?
  117. Act Three Questions What is Macduff’s ambition revealed to be? Reread Scene 4, lines 40-45. How does this brief exchange demonstrate dramatic irony? Why are stage directions – “[To the Ghost]”-on pg 384 and 385 important? Reread Scene 1, lines 87-90. What does Macbeth ask the murderers? What does their response imply about what it means to be a real “man”? Does it seem that Macbeth’s ambition is producing benefits? Is Macbeth happier now that he has become king? Explain.
  118. Act IV Questions Which character does Macbeth focus on as his antagonist in Act Four? By the end of Act Four, what is this antagonist doing? Macbeth already has reached his goal of becoming king. What is Macbeth’s major ambition in Act Four? Which characters reveal ambition in Act Four? Whose ambition seems the most pure and just? Why? What error in judgment seems likely to lead to Macbecth’s ruin? What tragic flaw does this error in judgment reveal? Reread Scene 3, lines 205-208. As Ross shares his devasting news, what does he seem to suggest to Macduff?
  119. Macbeth Journal 4 “Blood will have blood.” What is the relevance of this quote from the play to today’s world?
  120. February 28

    Put yourself in the place of either Macbeth or Lady Macbeth. What would you have done differently or similarly? Why?
  121. Agenda Subject Verb Agreement Practice Read Act V – pg 418 Review Act V quotes and complete summary Reflection
  122. Subject Verb Agreement Practice Write five sentences using the following criteria. All sentences must use a present tense verb. Use “Most” as the subject. Use “Neither, Nor” at the beginning of the sentence. The first subject must be plural. The second must be singular. Start your sentence with “The teachers, in addition to the administrators…” Use “Neither” as the subject. Start your sentence with “Any of the paper…”
  123. Act V pg 418 Narrator Doctor Gentlewoman Lady Macbeth Macbeth Servant Seyton Malcolm Menteith Siward Messenger Ross
  124. Reflection Do you feel sorry for Lady Macbeth? Why or why not? What is the irony in Scene 4 when Malcolm asks the men to cut down the tree branches? Explain. Based on the ending speech, what similarities exist between Malcolm and Duncan?
  125. March 3Look back at February 17 (the first time we looked at these). Has your opinion changed after reading Macbeth? How? Also, how can you relate at least two of these statements to our reading? Explain. 1. Behind every great man is a great woman. 2. Sometimes it is necessary to do something wrong to get what you want. 3. What goes around comes around. 4. There are circumstances or events that justify murder. 5. Success is worth any price. 6. One mistake always leads to another. 7. A guilty conscious will destroy you. 8. Greed and ambition are the same.
  126. Agenda Subject Verb Agreement Practice Macbeth Debate Prep Progress Check Two DUE Friday, March 7 Macbeth Final Quiz Thursday Journals Due Thursday Subject Verb Agreement Quiz Friday
  127. Subject Verb Agreement Choose 5 subject verb rules to focus on. Create a 5 problem quiz with 5 sentences in which someone must find and underline the subject AND choose between a singular or plural verb. Do NOT copy my examples. Example: Each of the girls on my volleyball team also like/likes to play softball. Most of the stadium is/are filled with football fans. Most of the students waits/wait until the last minute to complete their work.
  128. Debate Prep Your group will have at least 5 members. Each person must speak once. A couple will speak twice. Your goal will be to convince the audience either Macbeth is inherently good, Macbeth is inherently bad, Lady Macbeth is inherently good, or Lady Macbeth is inherently bad. Everyone has read Macbeth, so be sure to include relevant, accurate examples from the text to support your argument. You will be judged based on your knowledge of the text, critical thinking, and persuasive abilities. You MUST have a thesis statement. State your purpose for persuading us and support it. Your thesis statement should appear in your topic sentence, between each point, and in your concluding sentence. Each speaker will have a 2 minute time limit. So, PRACTICE.
  129. Debate Schedule
  130. Rubric
  131. Helpful Hints Avoid slang. Avoid filler words – like, huh, yea If you mess up, take a breath. Avoid conversational tone. Sound like an authority on the subject. Be confident. Don’t apologize. Stand tall. Be prepared. Practice.
  132. Macbeth Journal 5 Can you think of recent leaders/celebrities whose over-reaching ambition caused their downfall? Explain.
  133. March 5

    Free Write
  134. Agenda Subject Verb Agreement Practice – Review Practice Quiz Macbeth Debate Prep Returning Work Progress Check Two DUE Friday, March 7 Subject Verb Agreement Quiz Friday Macbeth Final Quiz Tomorrow Journals Due Tomorrow
  135. Subject Verb Agreement None of the team want/wants to compete at WSSU competition. Either my dad or none of us is/are going to attend the school’s basketball game. Each cat is/are important to Stephanie. A majority of the lessons in precalculus is/are easy. Either of the boys is/are going to football practice. Most of the crowd is/are on their feet in the stadium. Neither Adam nor his brothers is/are home. Each person walk/walks to the stage. The students and instructor each hopes/hope for a new facility by next year.
  136. Progress Reports Place ALL work in the purple folder to return to me. Write your name on the tab. Look over your grades on your progress report and on what I return to you. Write a reflection about your grades on your progress report. Look at where you did well and where you could use some improvement. Is this where you want to be? If it’s not, write a plan to get you where you want to be. If it is, what’s your plan to stay where you are and not get comfortable and detour?
  137. March 6

    The dead trees and peeling paint, along with the broken windows and flapping shutters, (make/makes) everyone believe that evil spirits haunt the deserted Sinclair house. Neither of those sharks circling your boogie board (look/looks) hungry enough to bite. Physics (has/have) proven to be Jerry’s easiest subject this semester. He brings Carol, the lab assistant, an oatmeal-raisin cookie, and as his reward, she finishes his report. This weekend, a Great White shark, as well as a school of barracuda, (is/are) terrorizing the tourists at Daytona Beach. Every piece of popcorn and dropped chocolate on the theater floor (has/have) stuck in the treads of Larry’s new running shoes.
  138. Agenda Macbeth Debate Macbeth Final Quiz Journals Due Progress Check Two DUE Tomorrow Subject Verb Agreement Quiz Tomorrow
  139. March 7

    Which indefinite pronouns can be either singular or plural? Which indefinite pronouns are singular? Which indefinite pronouns are plural? Do collective nouns use a singular or plural verb? What is the rule concerning either, or/neither,nor? What makes a verb singular?
  140. Agenda Progress Check Two DUE Subject Verb Agreement Quiz Macbeth Debate Reflection Graduation Project Check-in
  141. Reflection Who won the debate? Why? Whose argument was most effective? Who had the best evidence? Who was most persuasive? Who did you find yourself agreeing with even though you thought you wouldn’t? What can you take away from the debate that will help you with your graduation presentation?
  142. Graduation Project March 17 – Portfolio Lab Day March 19 – Products March 26 – Presentation Day
  143. March 10

    “Love is blind.” Do you agree/disagree? Why? Think of at least one movie/song where the characters are “blinded” by their love for one another or the theme is love is blind. Describe the movie or song and how you know it is about love being blind.
  144. Agenda Sonnet Notes Paraphrase Sonnets Create Visual Representations Write a sonnet
  145. AcadVocab Sonnet – 14 line lyric poem Octave – first 8 lines Sestet – last 6 lines Quatrains – stanzas of 4 lines Couplet – 2 lines Petrarchan (Italian) Sonnet – abbaabbacdcdcd Octave that establishes situation - abbaabba Sestet that resolves, draws conclusion about or expresses reaction to situation - cdcdcd Shakespearean (English) Sonnet – ababcdcdefefgg 1ST Quatrain introduces situation - abab 2nd Quatrain explores the situation - cdcd 3rd Quatrain usually includes a turn or shift in thought - efef Couplet resolves the situation - gg Iambic pentameter – line of poetry with 5 meters, or 10 syllables
  146. Sonnet Paraphrase and Visual Sonnet Number Author Paraphrase the sonnet Create a visual representation of the sonnet Spencer Sonnet 30 – pg 320 Sonnet 75 – pg 321 Shakespeare Sonnet 29 – pg 328 Sonnet 116 – pg 329 Sonnet 130 – pg 330 Petrach Sonnet 90 – pg 336 Sonnet 292 – pg 337
  147. Write your own sonnet Follow either the Petrarchan or Shakespearean form Due Wednesday
  148. March 11

    King’s College Graduation Presentation
  149. March 12

    What is the most memorable part of yesterday’s presentation? What did you take away that will be the most helpful for you and your preparation for your presentation?
  150. Agenda Sonnet Due Review Subject Verb Quiz Rhetorical Devices Speech Examples Speech Prep Homework: Create a Gmail account Bring notecards Tuesday March 18 Unit 2 Test Wednesday March 19 Products due Wednesday
  151. Rhetorical Devices Analogy – a comparison between two dissimilar things to explain an unfamiliar subject in terms of a familiar one Ex: A gang of boys is like a pack of wolves. Antithesis – the expression of contrasting ideas in parallel grammatical form Ex: Give me liberty, or give me death Repetition – the repeated use of a word or a phrase for emphasis Ex: Let it come! I repeat it, sir, let it come! Parallelism – form of repetition in which grammatical pattern is repeated Ex: I have a dream. Rhetorical question – a question to which no answer is expected
  152. Speech Examples “When Life Gives You Lemons” “Think About the Consequences” “Dedication” Extra Credit View speeches Complete survey
  153. Impromptu Speeches Think of at least 3 statements to make about your topic. During your speech Intro – tell us what you are going to say – make it interesting Body – tell us – make us understand Conclude – tell us what you said – make it memorable
  154. Impromptu Topics The best letter of the alphabet Your favorite person A day to remember I lost it! A trip to remember If I could only eat three foods forever Three surprising facts about me A day in my life An important lesson I’ve learned What I’ve learned from cartoons How to be a slacker
  155. March 13

    If you did not present yesterday, choose from one of these topics and be ready to present in 5 minutes. -tell us about your nickname -3 uses for a pencil -what animal would you be -the best music -if you were invisible -Grab a laptop. -Log on. -Go to Google Chrome/Mozilla. -Open your Google Drive.
  156. Agenda Finish Impromptu Speeches Creating Graduation Portfolios in Google Drive Writing the Letter to the Judges Writing the Reflection Essay Homework Bring notecards Tuesday March 18 Unit 2 Test Wednesday March 19 Products due Wednesday Extra Credit
  157. March 14

    Rate these qualities from most important to least important when it comes to the qualities of a leader: charisma, courage, eloquence, intelligence, and morality. What do you think is missing from the list?
  158. Agenda Academic Vocab - metaphysical conceit and humanism Reading “A Valediction Forbidding Mourning” pg 518 and ID metaphysical conceit Reading “Utopia” pg 446 and ID rhetorical devices Divide and Conquer Ladies – Female Orations and Eve’s Apology pg 472 Gentlemen – Of Studies and On Marriage and Single Life pg 464 Homework Bring notecards Tuesday March 18 Unit 2 Test Wednesday, March 19 Products due Wednesday Alternate Macbeth Debate Assignment du Friday
  159. Academic Vocab Metaphysical poetry – primarily devotional and often mystical in content; poets used intellect, logic, and argument to explore abstract concepts such as love and death; highly intellectual, slightly irreverent, and unconventional imagery Metaphysical conceit – a type of metaphor or simile in which the comparison is unusually striking, original, and elaborate
  160. Metaphysical Conceit Other artists seek success, But she found it a deceptive goal- A steep bridge full of pain and stress, Hard to cross, and not worth the toll.
  161. Metaphysical Conceit
  162. Metaphysical Conceit
  163. Metaphysical Conceit
  164. Metaphysical Conceit
  165. Metaphysical Conceit
  166. Humanism Revival of classic literature – Greek and Roman More worldly and secular Anthropocentric ideas – What??? Regarded humans as the crown of creation Help humans realize their potential and gifts Concentrate on perfection of worldly life not preparation for eternal life Pg 446
  167. Ladies To what do several of the speakers in “Female Orations” and the speaker in “Eve’s Apology in Defense of Women” attribute women’s weakness? What does this suggest about the likelihood of women’s position changing? If these speakers could see society in the United States today, would they feel that their concerns had been addressed? Why or why not? Find quotations about gender attitudes online, in magazine articles, social media, etc.
  168. Female Orations
  169. Gentlemen In “Of Studies,” what concerns does Sir Francis Bacon express about becoming too influenced by one’s studies? In “Of Marriage and Single Life,” Bacon offers the opinion that virtuous women use their goodness as an excuse to be prideful and stubborn. Do you agree or disagree with that opinion? Why? Write a table of contents for one of the two Bacon essays – imagining the essays are self-help books.
  170. Of Studies
  171. March 17

    Grab a laptop. Log on. Go to Google Chrome/Mozilla. Open your Google Drive.
  172. Agenda Completing Graduation Portfolios in Google Drive Writing the Letter to the Judges Writing the Reflection Essay Peer Editing Letters and Essays Homework Bring notecards tomorrow Unit 2 Test Wednesday Products due Wednesday
  173. March 18Vocab Words – Find the definitions

    Renovation Reverence Sagacity Scrutinize Spurious Prudent Querulous Rancorous Reclusive Reconciliation
  174. Agenda Test Review Grad Project Speech Prep Homework Products and Portfolios DUE TOMORROW
  175. March 19

    Unit 2 Test
  176. Test Break-Down Extended Response 10 points Everything else 2 points 1-28 = 51-78 36-49 = 79-92 Written Response on a separate sheet Pg 4 – A Pg 4 – B Pg 8 – C Pg 8 – D Pg 9 – Extended Response
  177. March 20

    What do you remember about Dr. Seuss? What is your favorite story? Why? Do you have a favorite memory about Dr. Seuss?
  178. Agenda New AcadVocab Read A Modest Proposal – pg 620 Letter to the Editor Vocab LINCs Looking Forward Macbeth Debate Alternate Assignment due tomorrow Presentations Wednesday March 26 Midterm Thursday March 27
  179. Acad Vocab Example 1Example 2 Satire – literary technique that ridicules people’s behavior or society’s institutions to bring about social reform irony – double meaning; what is said is the opposite of what is meant Sarcasm – mocking (You’re right on time.) Parody – mocking imitation of a known person, literary work, movie, or event Overstatement – exaggeration by saying more than you mean to say (3 year old artist) Understatement – implying the opposite by saying less than you mean to say (It’s a little cold – when it is below 30)
  180. Letter to the Editor Respond to Swift’s proposal Be the voice of a parent, government official, or concerned citizen Make your position clear and support it Use irony to get your point across Be concise
  181. Reflect Swift once said “I hate and detest that animal called man.” What does he mean by this? How can this relate to what we read today?
  182. LINCS Step 1: List the parts Step 2: Identify a Reminding Word Step 3: Note a LINCing Story Step 4: Create a LINCing Picture Step 5: Self-test
  183. LINCS Example
  184. An Effective Reminding Word EXAMPLES NEW WORD EXAMPLE flouritefloor serfservant paraffin pairs of fins
  185. An Effective Reminding Word NONEXAMPLES NEW WORD NONEXAMPLE shivareecelebration paramecium parapuse crinoline crinium
  186. March 21

    Did you turn in your best work for you product/portfolio? Why/Why not? What could you do to improve?
  187. Agenda Revising letters and products Preparing speeches Looking Forward Presentations Wednesday March 26 Midterm Thursday March 27
  188. Revising Hints No contractions Single space One page Don’t start with “Hi, my name is…” or “I am senior at Rocky River” – we know this, man. Your thesis does not need to be bold - but could be included. Date should be presentation date – March 26, 2014 Semi-colon after greeting “Dear Review Board Members:” Capitalize – Street Name, City, State, Greeting Left-align everything – no paragraph indents Skip one space between sections Have someone else read it
  189. March 24

    If you need to finish your test, have a seat in the rows near my desk. If not, have a seat in the rows closer to the door.
  190. Agenda Finish Unit Test Speech Prep Looking Forward Presentations Wednesday March 26 Midterm Thursday March 27
  191. March 25

    Speech Prep
  192. Agenda Speech Prep Midterm Review Looking Forward Presentations Tomorrow Midterm Thursday March 27
  193. March 26

    Speech Prep
  194. Agenda Speech Prep Midterm Review Looking Forward Midterm Tomorrow
  195. March 27

    Midterm
  196. March 28

    On a separate sheet of paper, write an advice letter to next year’s seniors. Share your expertise on the graduation project. What should they do? What should they not do? What would you have liked to know before starting the project?
  197. Agenda Unit 2 Objective Tracking Midterm Objective Tracking Returning Work Reflection Viewing Wuthering Heights
  198. Objective Tracking 21=71 22=72 23=73 25=75 27=77 4=54 5=55 6=56 7=57 8=58 9=59 23=73 24=74 26=76 28=78 1=51 3=53 10=60 12=62 14=64 16=66 2=52 13=63 15=65
  199. Reflection Look over the work you have submitted this semester and the grades you have received. Are you where you want to be? Pick one or two grades you know you could have done better on and write down what you should have done differently.
  200. March 31

    Finish each stem I see… I think… I wonder…
  201. Seating Chart
  202. Seating Chart
  203. Agenda Intro to Gothic Literature ID Gothic Elements in various mediums Finish Wuthering Heights Looking Forward Vocab Quiz Friday – HW due
  204. The Beginning Horace Walpole wrote The Castle of Otranto in 1765. Popular in 19th Century Mysterious, magical, and macabre
  205. Gothic Architecture
  206. Gothic Elements a castle, ruined or intact, haunted or not, ruined buildings which are sinister or which arouse a pleasing melancholy, dungeons, underground passages, crypts, and catacombs which, in modern houses, become spooky basements or attics, labyrinths, dark corridors, and winding stairs, shadows, a beam of moonlight in the blackness, a flickering candle, or the only source of light failing (a candle blown out or an electric failure), extreme landscapes, like rugged mountains, thick forests, or icy wastes, and extreme weather, omens and ancestral curses, magic, supernatural manifestations, or the suggestion of the supernatural, a passion-driven, willful villain-hero or villain, a curious heroine with a tendency to faint and a need to be rescued–frequently, a hero whose true identity is revealed by the end of the novel, horrifying (or terrifying) events or the threat of such happenings.
  207. “Near Hackness” John Atkinson Grimshaw
  208. Thriller
  209. ID Gothic Elements in Film Wuthering Heights Dracula
  210. April 1

    Finish each stem I see… I think… I wonder…
  211. Agenda Subject Verb Agreement Commonly Misused Words Frankenstein Anticipation Guide Analyzing music lyrics for themes Begin reading Frankenstein Finish Wuthering Heights Looking Forward Vocab Quiz Friday – HW due
  212. Vocab Prudent Querulous Rancorous Reclusive Reconciliation Renovation Reverence Sagacity Scrutinize Spurious
  213. Subject Verb Refresher Our dog Babe, together with her seven puppies, has/have chewed all the stuffing out of the sofa cushions. This weekend, a Great White shark, as well as a school of barracuda, is/are terrorizing the tourists at Daytona Beach. Where is/are the bowl of squid eyeball stew and the platter of broccoli-chocolate muffins that Madison made for Elizabeth’s housewarming party? Here is/are the fifty-dollar bill that I promised for pet sitting Bo-Bo, my Jack Russell terrier, this weekend. Neither of my two older brothers invest/invests money wisely.
  214. Commonly Misused Words Affect vs Effect Affect = to influence Effect = to accomplish & the result of an action A lot Can, May, and Will Fewer or Less Fewer = Can you count it? Less Hisself, Theirself, and Theirselves
  215. Anticipation Guide Everyone has a hidden monster inside of them. Isolating ourselves will magnify our problems rather than resolve them. Parents/guardians have a never-ending responsibility for their children. Fame and glory are worth seeking. Science is better than Nature. Some secrets are worth hiding. What we choose to do will have an effect on others.
  216. April 2

    Who is writing the letters? To whom is he writing? What is their relationship? Where is the writer? Why is he there? What are his plans? What is he feeling?
  217. Agenda Commonly Misused Words Reading Frankenstein Finishing Wuthering Heights Looking Forward Vocab Quiz Friday – HW due
  218. Commonly Misused Words Than vs Then Than is used for comparisons Then tells when Their, They’re, There Their = possessive of they They’re = they are There = at that place Well vs Good Good = Adjective; Well = Adjective and Adverb Feeling good vs Feeling well Who vs Whom Who = subjective; Whom = objective Of vs Have Would have not Would of; Could have not Could of
  219. April 3

    What Gothic elements have you seen in Wuthering Heights and Frankenstein?
  220. Agenda Gothic Film Study Vote Commonly Misused Words Finish Wuthering Heights (2nd) Reading Frankenstein Chapter 1-2 Create Open Mind Organizer Looking Forward Vocab Quiz Tomorrow – HW Due
  221. Gothic Film Study Movie Show The Haunting The Dark Knight Harry Potter The Corpse Bride Once Upon a Time The Walking Dead The Bates Motel Hannibal Supernatural The Following
  222. Commonly Misused Words Your vs You’re Your = Possessive You’re = You are Who, Which, That Who = people Which & That = Things At Where you at? = NO Where are you? = YES Off or Off of vs From You did not get it OFF the internet; you got it FROM the internet. Myself She and I NOT She and myself Could you do a favor for me? NOT Could you do a favor for myself?
  223. Open Mind Organizer Draw two heads on a sheet of paper One belongs to Victor Frankenstein The other to Robert Walton Fill each head with words, symbols, illustrations, and phrases that would be going through the mind of these characters On the back, write a short explanation of what you included and why
  224. April 4

    Review your vocab words. Quiz begins in 5 minutes.
  225. Agenda Vocab Quiz Finish Open Mind Organizer Researching topics related to Frankenstein Creating presentation of material
  226. Research Topics The Life of Mary Shelley The Advent of Science Fiction The Romantic Period Victorian England Women in Victorian Society Prometheus
  227. Presentation Options Children’s book Poster Skit
  228. April 7

    Correct the paragraph. Rainy weather has a bad affect on myself. Alot of people that I know would agree. There moods are effected by the bad weather to. Your mood is affected by the weather. When it is sunny, your happy. When it is rainy, your not. When I am in a good mood, I do good. When I am in a bad mood, I wish I would of just stayed at home.
  229. Agenda Finish research Read Frankenstein Ch 3-5 Begin Dialectical Journal
  230. Dialectical Journal From the Text From Me From an Other My New Thinking
  231. Discussed Frankenstein Themes Being alone is okay Don’t know what you got ‘til it’s gone Don’t judge a book by its cover Trust none Nothing lasts Don’t love too late Know when to fold ‘em
  232. April 8

    Do you admire Frankenstein? Why/why not? New Vocab Words: Quiz and LINCs due after break ardent, irrevocably, benevolent, conjecture, enigmatic, venerable, wantonly, base, malicious, illustrious
  233. Agenda Gothic mini-movie Projects Common Errors Practice View Walking Dead/The Bates Motel Summarize the episode and explain the gothic elements Present research Read Frankenstein Ch 6-9
  234. Gothic Movie Rubric Gothic Elements: 80-100% Sound Track: matches and stirs emotion Dialogue: appropriate and clear Editing: smooth transitions Creativity: unique, interesting, inventive Spelling/Grammar: zero errors to unnoticeable Length: 4-5 minutes
  235. Common Errors Frank has less hobbies than his friend. Being as Bernard Malamud is my favorite writer, I was excited to find one of his novels on sale at my local bookstore. I think someone busted the culprits. The manager divided the work between the four of us. Have any of you did your research for your report yet?
  236. April 9

    Think about a time when you felt ashamed about something you had done. How did guilt affect you? How has guilt affected Frankenstein?
  237. Agenda Present research (2nd) Discuss Romantic Elements Read “Rime of the Ancient Mariner” – pg 814 Paraphrase and Present Name the ship Looking Forward Gothic mini-movie project
  238. Common Errors Did you hear that Tom got hisself a new job? Glasses like these had ought to be washed by hand. Mr. Hashem had an assignment for Emilio and ourselves. Literally then, the singer was catapulted to fame. As for Ted and myself, we’re going to the dance.
  239. Romantic Elements Personal Experience Powerful Feelings Love of Nature Importance of Commonplace Fascination with the Supernatural
  240. Name the Ship Ship names usually symbolize the hopes and dreams of those on board. What should the name of this ship be and why?
  241. April 10

    What are some reasons why a person might be rejected by others? Describe a situation in which a person might feel he or she has been repeatedly rejected by others. What emotional response might the person have?
  242. Agenda View Walking Dead/The Bates Motel Looking Forward Gothic mini-movie project
  243. Gothic Show Questions Describe the setting. Discuss time, place, costuming and props. Evaluate the use of special effects: Lighting, music, and sound. Compare gothic elements among the pieces we have seen and read. Summarize the plot.
  244. April 11

    Write three reasons why companionship or love is an important part of the human experience.
  245. Agenda Common Errors Practice Read Frankenstein Ch 10-11 Lit Circles Looking Forward Gothic mini-movie project
  246. Common Errors The magician dazzled us with flawless allusions. The cat jumped from the chair and leaped in my arms. The children helped theirselves to more vegetable curry. Jane and myself are the editors of our yearbook. Some people they’re always making a fuss about nothing.
  247. April 21

    Free Write (Which means write whatever comes to mind when it comes to mind. Don’t stop. If you write for a solid five minutes, I expect to see at least a page.)
  248. Agenda Common Errors Practice Read Frankenstein Ch 12-16 Criminal Profiling of Frankenstein’s creature Looking Forward Vocab quiz and LINCS due Friday, April 25 Gothic mini-movie project due Monday, April 28 Test Tuesday, April 29
  249. Vocab Ardent Irrevocably Benevolent Conjecture Enigmatic Venerable Wantonly Base Malicious Illustrious
  250. Common Errors Practice There are less/fewer ingredients in this recipe than/then you think there are. Being as/Since you have studied programming, could you help us install the new software. I did good/well on the quiz because I’ve been paying attention in class. Several dinosaur skeletons have been discovered beside/besides the river near here. No one yet knows how the World Wide Web will ultimately affect/effect our culture.
  251. Criminal Profile 1. What does this character look like? How does he/she carry himself? How does he/she dress? 2. How does this character speak? Does he/she have any identifiable speech patterns? 3. Where was this character born? How was he/she raised? 4. Describe the time period in which this character lives. How do the times affect this character’s thinking and actions? 5. What is this character’s main motivation? Why? 6. Describe any redeeming qualities this character may have. 7. Analyze the character’s personality flaws. From what do they stem? How do they affect the choices he/she makes? 8. Choose an object this character holds or would hold dear. Explain the connection. 9. Does this character have any secrets? If so, explain. 10. Who would be this character’s contemporary counterpart? Explain your choice.
  252. April 22

    “Welcome to a world without rules.” What would happen if we lived in a world such as this? What would it be like? Would it be better or worse than what we know now? Explain.
  253. Agenda Read Frankenstein Ch 17-20 Discussion Questions Begin viewing of The Dark Knight Looking Forward Vocab quiz and LINCS due Friday, April 25 Gothic mini-movie project due Monday, April 28 Test Tuesday, April 29
  254. Discussion Questions Does the creature have a valid request? What are the pros/cons of Victor’s compliance? Is the creature justified in his feelings?
  255. Viewing Guide Find ethical dilemmas for the following characters: Harvey Dent Bruce/Batman Rachel Jim Gordon Joker Discuss gothic elements found in: Setting Characters Plot
  256. April 23

    Who are the heroes of Wuthering Heights, The Walking Dead or The Bates Motel, and Frankenstein? What traits do they share? How are their lives similar? How are they different?
  257. Agenda Grammar Practice Notes on Villain-Hero Read Frankenstein Ch 21-24 Continue The Dark Knight
  258. Villain-Hero The villain of a story who either 1) poses as a hero at the beginning of the story or 2) simply possesses enough heroic characteristics (charisma, sympathetic past, etc) so that either the reader or the other characters see the villain-hero as more than a simple bad guy Satanic Hero – a villain whose evil deeds and justifications of them make him a more interesting character Promethean – a villain who has done good but only by performing an overreaching or rebellious act Byronic Hero – aristocratic, suave, moody, handsome, solitary, secretive, brilliant, cynical, sexually intriguing, and nursing a secret wound – he is renowned because of his fatal attraction for female characters
  259. April 24

    Who is more guilty – Frankenstein or his creature? Who has more justification for their actions? Explain.
  260. Agenda Grammar Practice Finish Frankenstein Continue Dark Knight
  261. April 25

    Review your vocab words.
  262. Agenda Vocab Quiz Romantic Poetry Group Assignment Present Info
  263. Romantic Poets Wordsworth – “Wandering…” pg 808 Coleridge – “Kubla Khan” pg 841 Gordon – “…Pilgrimage” pg 854 Shelley – “Ozymandias” pg 862 Keats – “When I Have Fears…” pg 880
  264. Romantic Poetry Assignment 1. Terms 2.Poet History 3. Romantic Elements 4. TPFASTT Metaphor Simile Personification Apostrophe Symbols Alliteration Assonance Personal pronoun Paraphrase Consonance Imagery Hyperbole Title (before reading) Paraphrase (Summary) Figurative Language Attitude (tone) Shifts Title (after reading) Theme 3 facts Personal Experience Powerful Feelings Love of Nature Importance of Commonplace Fascination with the Supernatural
  265. April 28

    Grab a sheet from the stool and start working on it.
  266. Agenda Body Biography Continue The Dark Knight Looking Forward Test Wednesday Gothic Movies due Thursday
  267. Body Biography Heathcliffe Catherine Frankenstein Frankenstein’s creature Rick Grimes/Norman Bruce Wayne Joker
  268. April 29

    Grab a sheet from the stool and start working on it.
  269. Agenda Finish Dark Knight Finish Body Bio Test Review
  270. Test Review 1. Terms 2.Gothic Elements 3. Romantic Elements 4. Wuthering Heights 5. Frankenstein 6. The Dark Knight 7. The Walking Dead/The Bates Motel 8. The Villain-Hero Metaphor Simile Personification Apostrophe Symbols Alliteration Assonance Personal pronoun Paraphrase Consonance Imagery Hyperbole Personal Experience Powerful Feelings Love of Nature Importance of Commonplace Fascination with the Supernatural
  271. April 30

    -Test Today- Make sure you know the differences in the types of villain-heroes. Gothic Movies Due Tomorrow
  272. Test Directions Complete the following on your scantron: 1-16 17-20 = A 21-28 Essay Prompt: Compare and contrast the different villain-heroes we have read. Identify one hero for each villain-hero type and explain why that hero fits that category. Explain your answer by giving specific details from the text. Your essay must contain 5 paragraphs with a thesis, supporting paragraphs, and conclusion.
  273. May 1

    Grab a sheet from the stool and start working on it.
  274. Agenda Bit.ly/msggothicmovieeval Present and Evaluate Gothic Movies What did you like most? What could have been better? Evaluate the gothic.
  275. May 5

    What are these? Why do you use them? What do they mean? Which one applies to you today? Why? Can there be more than one interpretation for one face? What would happen if you misunderstood the way one was used? Are there basic or complex emotions expressed?
  276. Agenda KWL Discussion on Autism Reading A Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time Comprehension and Analysis Questions during and after reading Reflection
  277. Autism and Me What do you KNOW about autism? What would you WANT to know about autism (or what questions do you have? What have you learned about autism?
  278. Chapter 2 What do you learn about Christopher by reading this passage? What do you learn about what is important to him? How does he see things? How might he be different from you, or even the same? What kind of narrative style characterizes this passage? Can you complete the story from that point? What are your first impressions of the story? Narrative Styles First Person Third Person Limited Third Person Omniscient Unreliable
  279. Chapter 3 Why does Christopher tear the piece of paper and throw it away? What do the faces represent?
  280. Chapter 5 What are some things Christopher does that are considered a result of his autism?
  281. Chapter 7 Examine the footnote on p. 5 of the book. Why does Christopher use footnotes?
  282. Chapter 11 Christopher provides insight into his behavior on p. 7 when he begins to press his forehead on the ground, ignoring the policeman. However, the policeman does not have the vantage point that we have. If we were ignorant about Christopher in the way that the policeman is, what would we think of Christopher? If the policeman had known what we know about this narrator, how might he have approached Christopher differently?
  283. Chapter 13 Christopher digresses to talk about the book. Why?
  284. Chapter 17 What additions or “flourishes” do you notice in his storytelling? What do these tell us about this narrator?
  285. Chapter 19 A digression on prime numbers. What do we learn, factually speaking, about such numbers as we read this chapter? How does Chapter 19 shed light on the subject matter of the previous chapter? What philosophy does Christopher extract from his digression on prime numbers?
  286. Reflection Compare Christopher to the children you observed in “Autism and Me.” How are they alike? How are they different?
  287. May 6

    Grab a Curious Incident book. One of the best things about Christopher’s writing is his detail and explanation. Look back at the pages that we read yesterday (Chapter 2-19) and find at least 5 examples of simile or metaphor.
  288. Agenda Research Sir Arthur Conan Doyle Deductive Logic A Study in Scarlet One Sherlock Holmes short story ID 10 unknown vocab words and define
  289. May 7

    Identify whether this is deductive or inductive. 1. All humans will die. I am human. I will die. 2. My wife and her mom are nags. All women are nags. 3. I am having a good year. This is a lucky year. 4. All dogs have a good sense. Spot is a dog. Spot has a good sense of smell. 5. It is dangerous to drive in the snow. It is snowing right now. It is dangerous to drive now. 6. Every 3 year old you know whines. All 3 year olds whine.
  290. Agenda Grammar Practice Reading A Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time Comprehension and Analysis Questions during and after reading Reasoning search
  291. Grammar Curious Incident Pg 7 Paragraph beginning with “He was asking too many questions…” Rewrite the paragraph making the necessary grammar corrections.
  292. Grammar He was asking too many questions and he was asking them too quickly. They were stacking up in my head like loaves in the factory where Uncle Terry works. The factory is a bakery and he operates the slicing machines. And sometimes a slicer is not working fast enough but the bread keeps coming and there is a blockage. I sometimes think of my mind as a machine, but not always as a bread-slicing machine. It makes it easier to explain to other people what is going on inside it.
  293. Chapter 23,29, 31, and 37 What do the items in Christopher’s pockets reveal about him? Why does Christopher find people confusing? Do you agree? What do we find out about Christopher’s relationship with his father in this chapter? What symbolic gesture do they share with each other? Why is this? What does it mean? What does Christopher say about telling lies? Do you believe him?
  294. Chapters 41, 43, and 47 How would you characterize the relationship between Christopher and his father? Look at the relationship through Christopher’s eyes, his father’s eyes, and through your own eyes. What words describe the demeanor of the narrator's father on the ride home from the police headquarters? Why is the narrator's father frustrated by the time they reach home from the police headquarters? Why does the narrator say that he will not bother his father after his father admits to being sad? How long ago does the narrator say his mother died? The type of day the narrator has depends on the number of cars he passes on the way to school. What are the two types of days that he has?
  295. Chapters 53, 59, and 61 What did Father tell the narrator his mother died of? Why does the narrator decide to investigate the death of the dog despite his father's admonishments? What example does the narrator give of his father breaking the rules?
  296. Reasoning Search With a partner, find at least 3 examples of Christopher’s reasoning. Determine whether his reasoning is deductive or inductive.
  297. May 8

    “Wouldn’t it be great to be gifted? In fact…It turns out that choices lead to habits. Habits become talents. Talents are labeled gifts. You’re not born this way, you get this way.” -Seth Godin Why do you agree/disagree? At what do you want to be considered “gifted?” How did you get to be “gifted” at it? Is Christopher “gifted?” Why/Why not?
  298. Agenda Grammar Practice Read “Dog keeps boy with autism safe” and answer reading questions Read Curious Incident and discuss possible themes
  299. Reflection: The following is a list of topics that could be explored in Curious Incident. From your reading so far, what do you think one possible message could be? Write a short explanation on a half sheet to turn in. Be sure to use examples from the book. Disorder in life Independence Education Family Growth and Change Journeys Surviving Truth Relationships Diversity Communication Acceptance Logic Escape Rage
  300. May 9

    If I said the following were incidences of foreshadowing in Curious Incident, what would you think is going to happen? -Why didn’t Christopher go to his mother’s funeral? -I asked her whether she knew of anyone who might want to make Mrs. Shears sad. And she said, “Perhaps you should be talking to your father about this.” -Mr. and Mrs. Shears lived together until 2 years ago. Then, Mr. Shears left and never came back.
  301. Agenda HW due – reflection and progress report Reading Curious Incident pg 48-69 and answering comprehension questions Curious Incident Vocab Research
  302. Questions Christopher lists his “behavioral problems” on pg 46. What do we learn about our own behavioral problems by reading Christopher’s list? What do we learn about his parents’ difficulties as well? Mrs. Alexander ends up being quite conversant with Christopher. Describe their relationship (pg 56-61). What does Christopher learn not merely about the dog’s murder but about his mother and father as well, from this neighbor? Christopher describes the “Monty Hall” math problem on pg 64-65, and he provides us with a description of clouds on pg 67-69. To what extent are these digressions unrelated to the story? To what extent are they related?
  303. Vocab – quiz and LINCs May 16 Apocryphal Subtly Imploding Aperture Snooker Crematorium Bloke Circumspect Grievously Saccades
  304. May 12

    Is kindness sometimes better than the truth? Explain.
  305. Agenda Vocab quiz and LINCs Friday Read Curious Incident pg 69-102 Reading Questions
  306. Analyze these quotes The world is full of obvious things which nobody by any chance ever observes. Sherlock Holmes had, in a very remarkable degree, the power of detaching his mind at all. My memory is like film. But sometimes a mystery isn’t a mystery.
  307. May 13

    Go ahead, grab a laptop, and continue working on your Sherlock Holmes Group Assignment.
  308. Agenda Research Sir Arthur Conan Doyle Deductive Logic A Study in Scarlet One Sherlock Holmes short story ID 10 unknown vocab words and define Read Curious Incident pg 102-124
  309. Final Project – Due May 23 Create a comic strip or a storyboard for the events in the story. Be sure that the illustrations explain the story clearly. Do not include every detail-- only those that are necessary to understand the actions. Must contain at least 6 scenes. Rewrite the story or part of the story as a poem or a song. Be sure to include important incidents and conflicts. Must contain at least 20 lines. Design a large-scale poster for a film adaptation of the book. Include a synopsis of story and a meaningful picture representing some aspect of the novel. Make a scrapbook for Christopher. This should look like a real scrapbook, complete with actual memorabilia, awards, letters, photos, mementos, ticket stubs, report cards, etc. Include the book title or the character’s name on the book. Label each item (at least 15) and explain its significance. Act out and video tape at least three scenes from the book. The entire presentation should run about ten minutes. Submit a written copy of setting, dialogue, direction, etc. along with the videotape. Design a CD cover (front, back, and insides). The back cover should list the soundtrack for the novel (title and artist) that includes at least 10 well-known songs. On the inside, write at least one sentence (per song) explaining how it relates to the story events or character(s).
  310. Final Project Rubric Connection to Text: 20 Appearance: 10 Minimum Requirements: 10 Grammar/Mechanics: 10
  311. May 14

    What does the novel show us about the nature of trust? How would you react if you were in Christopher’s situation?
  312. Agenda Vocab quiz and LINCs Friday Sherlock Project Read Curious Incident pg 125-155 Create a Curious Incident Timeline
  313. Timeline Create a timeline of the events we have read so far. Remember that Christopher has jumped around. Include at least 10 events. Write a short caption for each. Include a picture. Be creative.
  314. May 15

    What do you think about Christopher’s parents?
  315. Agenda Vocab quiz and LINCs tomorrow Read Curious Incident pg 155-179 Curious Incident Pictionary
  316. May 16

    Review your vocab words.
  317. Agenda Vocab Quiz Read Curious Incident pg 179-200 Curious Incident Scene Rewrite
  318. Scene Rewrite Pick a scene and rewrite it from another character’s perspective. Write at least one page. Think about what you know about that character and stay true to the character
  319. New Vocab Senile Digression Irate Profane Acute Corrugated Veranda Spire Gradient Negligible
  320. May 19

    What does the novel show us about the nature of truth? Does the novel show us that sometimes it’s okay to lie or tell “untruths”? Do you agree or disagree? Explain.
  321. Agenda Read Curious Incident pg 200-221 Exam Review – Literary Terms
  322. May 20

    Go ahead, grab a laptop, and log on.
  323. Agenda Sherlock Research Project Exam Review Reminders Make-up Work Extra Credit Last Daybook Check – Test Grade Grammar Quiz
  324. May 21

    -Write a news story about Christopher making top grades on his A-level Maths. -Include information about his autism, his family struggles, and his determination. -Write at least a page and a half. -Have a headline. -Include specific details from the story. -Use correct grammar and spelling. -Do not use “you.”
  325. Agenda Daybook Check Friday Viewing Temple Grandin Exam Review
  326. May 22

    “The test of literature is, I suppose, whether we ourselves live more intensely for the reading of it.” Agree/Disagree. Explain.
  327. Agenda Daybook Check Tomorrow Viewing Temple Grandin Exam Review
  328. May 23

    Free Write
  329. Agenda Exam Review
  330. May 27

    Take a sheet from the stool and begin working on it.
  331. Agenda Slam Poetry Exam Review
  332. Slam Poetry I’m taking my ball and going home Repetition Parallelism Metaphor Alliteration Simile Imagery
  333. Poetry Slam Write a “slam” poem. It should take somewhere between 1-3 minutes to perform. If it occupies about a page and a half, you’re probably doing it right. You should also incorporate sophisticated figurative language (imagery, similes, etc.) and sound devices such as repetition and alliteration to help with the “flow” of your poem. Your classmates will verify their presence after you perform. Be prepared to present your poem to the class. Remember that slam poetry is a performance art – it’s not enough to simply stand there and “read” your poem to the class.
  334. May 28

    Review Vocab
  335. Agenda Vocab Quiz Poetry Slam Exam Review
  336. Poetry Slam Write a “slam” poem. It should take somewhere between 1-3 minutes to perform. If it occupies about a page and a half, you’re probably doing it right. You should also incorporate sophisticated figurative language (imagery, similes, etc.) and sound devices such as repetition and alliteration to help with the “flow” of your poem. Your classmates will verify their presence after you perform. Be prepared to present your poem to the class. Remember that slam poetry is a performance art – it’s not enough to simply stand there and “read” your poem to the class.
  337. May 29

    Finish writing your Slam Poem
  338. Agenda Slam Poem Reading Exam Review
  339. May 30

    Good Morning
  340. Agenda Looking Back Reflection Exam Review
  341. Inference Questions Sonnet 116 pg 329 Lorelei pg 794 (Question on pg 795) Wordsworth pg 807 Hopkins pg 964 Housman pg 1062 Yeats pg 1192 Heaney pg 1304