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Reducing Demand for & Consumption of Illegally Traded Species Products in China Jianbin SHI PowerPoint Presentation
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Reducing Demand for & Consumption of Illegally Traded Species Products in China Jianbin SHI

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Reducing Demand for & Consumption of Illegally Traded Species Products in China Jianbin SHI

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  1. Reducing Demand for & Consumption of Illegally Traded Species Products in China Jianbin SHI TRAFFIC China Programme

  2. Established in 1976 as Joint programm of Registered in June 1999 as a U.K. Charity It is specifically to assist in the implementation of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) Introduction to TRAFFIC

  3. TRAFFIC, the wildlife trade monitoring network, works to ensure that trade in wild plants and animals is not a threat to the conservation of nature.

  4. Wildlife trade – what is it? The sale and exchange by people of wild animal and plant resources – buying selling, bartering, exchanging, importing, exporting, re-exporting – alive or as parts and derivatives

  5. # 1: Drugs ($320 bn) Illegal wildlife trade = $10-20 billionannually # 2: Human Trafficking ($32 bn) #3: Illegal Wildlife Trade ($10-20 bn) Source: Global Financial Integrity, 2011

  6. Annual global value illegal wildlife trade – $10 to 20 billion. • Organized syndicates attracted to this low risk and high profit crime that can sustain broader criminal enterprises and diversify income streams The significance of illegal wildlife trade Over- harvesting (consumption, trade) Ecological damage/ Habitat destruction Commercial extinction – damages economy Undermines investment in sustainable management Profits don’t reach local communities causing social instability Invasive alien species damage agriculture and ecosystems

  7. 668 in 2012

  8. About 25,000 elephants are poached every year for ivory

  9. Drivers of Demand in markets • High profits, low risk • Increased purchasing power • ‘Conspicuous consumption’ by newly wealthy • Wildlife products confer status • Asian baselines of tradition – medicinal, crafts and luxury items • Amplified by trends, fashion and folklore • e.g. Rhino horn as cancer cure

  10. An Innovative and Integrated Approach Supply Reduction – reducing market availability through law enforcement effectiveness SOURCE TRANSIT MARKET Demand Reduction - Behavioural change efforts to dissuade consumption of illegal wildlife products

  11. Overview of TRAFFIC’s current work on DR for a variety of flagship species “Developing Global Support Program to Reduce Demand for Tiger [and other endangered species’] Parts and Derivatives” CHINA“Reducing demand for Tiger, elephant, rhino and marine turtle products” VIETNAM “Reducing consumer demand for rhino horn products”

  12. Changing behaviour in Chinathrough a five step approach

  13. Foundations from which to build

  14. Market Research to get insight behind the consumption behaviour

  15. Strategy for Reducing Demand for Illegal Wildlife Products in China (Draft)

  16. Engaging the Public’s imagination

  17. Engaging the Government as an Ally

  18. Engaging the TCM Sector as an Ally

  19. Engaging the Private Sector as an Ally – e-commerce

  20. Engaging the Private Sector as an Ally – private sector

  21. Experts Workshops to Discuss Approaches to ReducingDemand for Tiger and other Endangered Species Products

  22. Messaging identified to tackle specific motivations and triggers for Tiger and other endangered species product consumption Triggers Who can tackle the triggers Messaging type Health care/ Treatment TCM leaders, practitioners Promoting better quality/ more effective alternatives. Highlight the amount of fake products Emphases ‘shame’ & laws, regulations Business leaders, iconic figures in society and culture, family (esp. young people)/friends Maintain Relationships Investment Beauty Female fashion leaders (models, designers both specified) – look for ‘early adopters’ in other circles Make it a fad; not the most stylish option

  23. Framing the message… Sending the message… Where/how? Harmonious view of nature good Government Business leaders TCM practitioners Cultural and social role models Young people Family and friends Religious leaders Through e.g. Corporate Codes of Conduct Anti - corruption HR managers: new staff training Social media messaging, microblogs, etc Good business, brand values, religious values Fashionable, cool, trendy the latest pioneering thing Business magazines/ newspapers Shame Marketing companies can help to spread the message Ecological civilization, Provide alternative

  24. How we can influence the young people through Social Media engagement Appropriate approaches How Functional needs • Recognize their needs • Tell them the downside of their needs • Provide alternatives/ solution • Find a role model Emphasise the importance of ‘truth seeking’ and a scientific, evidence based approach Health care/ treatment (i.e. tiger bone, rhino horn) Fashion and religion (i.e. ivory Buddhism plate) Emphases that religious values promote the protection and equality of animals Investment Lead new fashion (make refusing wildlife products a fashion using a role model)

  25. UNEP can play a critical role in reducing demand for and consumption of illegal wildlife products

  26. Thank You 謝謝