2012 Protest Groups and Reform Movements: Standing Up for the Oppressed Lesson - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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2012 Protest Groups and Reform Movements: Standing Up for the Oppressed Lesson

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  1. 2012 Protest Groups and Reform Movements: Standing Up for the Oppressed Lesson Date your papers: Monday, March 19, 2012---Introduce Topic and Begin To Take Notes Tuesday, March 20, 2012---Take Notes Wednesday, March 21, 2012---Share Notes Thursday, March 22, 2012---Create Historical Caricature Friday, March 23, 2012---Create Historical Caricature Monday, March 26, 2012---Create Historical Caricature Tuesday, March 27, 2012---Presentations Wednesday, March 28, 2012---Presentations

  2. Industrial Revolution Study Guide Questions Covered In This Lesson • How were women perceived and treated during the Industrial Revolution and why? • How did women change their position through the Suffrage Movement? • How did the Industrial Revolution affect the social classes? How were each of the social classes defined? • What was the Chartist Movement? Why did it develop? What were its major actions? What were its effects? • Who were the Luddites? What role did they play in the Industrial Revolution? • What were Trade Unions? What obstacles did they have to overcome? How did they? Effects?

  3. Guiding Questions: • What major economic and social changes occurred as a result of mass industrialization during the 19th century? • How did the forces of Liberalism and Nationalism begin to change society during the 19th century?

  4. Monday, March 19, 2012 • Quiet Question: You are going to create a Political Bumper Sticker for TWO of the five economic theories we studied in the last lesson. You are to design each bumper sticker to convince British citizens to support the theory. You must consider who your audience is: nobles, wealthy factory and mine owners, middle class, working class, members of Parliament, men, women, religious groups, etc… • Select ONE from the following: • Laissez-Faire Capitalism • Social Darwinism • Select ONE from the following: • Utilitarianism • Socialism • Communism

  5. Monday, March 19, 2012 • Political Bumper Sticker Requirements: • Must have a catchy slogan that captures the essence/key beliefs of the Economic Theory---it should rhyme, play off a common catch-phrase or proverb, use alliteration, assonance, consonance, hyperbole, imagery, or onomatopoeia. • There should be an image or symbol that represents either the founder of the theory or exemplifies the theory. • There should be a color-scheme that has meaning in relation to the theory. • Use your Propaganda Strategies Pink Packet to help you with this.

  6. Ms. Barben’s Example of a Political Bumper Sticker for Mercantilism Self-Sufficiency Supports Success Mercantilism = Money

  7. Monday, March 19, 2012 • Pair-Share: Turn to your partner and present your Bumper Stickers. Partners should give feedback…what was strong and explain why, and what could be improved and how. • Individual: Type One Prompt---Based upon all we have learned thus far of the Industrial Revolution, what would be your TOP THREE ISSUES that should be reformed first and why. a) b) c)

  8. Monday, March 19, 2012 • Class: Students will share their Type One Prompts. Ms. Barben will introduce the Group Project with “The Price of Progress”: • The Price of Progress: Great Britain led the way in the Industrial Revolution and benefitted from its advances, but it was also one of the first to feel its costs. Reformers and politicians had been aware of the these costs from the time of the first factories, but delayed making laws and creating organizations to address these problems once they became overwhelming. Some of the first reform laws that were passed dealt with voting issues and child labor. We are going to be examining some of these reform groups whose efforts finally forced Parliament to pass laws to improve the British society for all.

  9. Monday, March 19, 2012 • Groups: You will be broken up into five groups to research, take notes on, create a Historical Caricature for, and teach to the class. • Protest and Reform Movements: • Luddites: General Ned Ludd • Suffragettes: Emmeline Pankhurst and WSPU • Unions: Do overall unions and then focus on the Matchgirls’ Strike • Political Reform: Chartist Movement • Political Reform and Prime Ministers: Prime Minister Peel, Prime Minister Disraeli, and Prime Minister Gladstone---If assigned this, do three smaller historical caricatures to address each separately to avoid being confusing • Resources: • Textbook Pages: Great Britain Voting Reforms: page 635, 668, Trade Unions: page 657, Roles of Women: pages 661-663 • Supplemental Reading for Assigned Movement • Ms. Barben’sPowerpoint for Assigned Movement

  10. Monday, March 19, 2012 • Monday, March 19, 2012---Introduce Topic and Begin To Take Notes • Tuesday, March 20, 2012---Take Notes • Wednesday, March 21, 2012---Share Notes • Thursday, March 22, 2012---Create Historical Caricature • Friday, March 23, 2012---Create Historical Caricature • Monday, March 26, 2012---Create Historical Caricature • Tuesday, March 27, 2012---Presentations • Wednesday, March 28, 2012---Presentations

  11. A)_________________ The caricature was a detailed drawing of a central historical figure. • On the person were objects and details that realistically could be on him and represent key beliefs, characteristics, and events. • Must have a MINIMUM of SEVEN historical aspects addressed on the figure • You CANNOT REPEAT CONCEPTS OR INFORMATION! If you do, it will not be counted. • Each historical aspect is worth 6 Points for a total of 42 Points. • Suggestions • Enlarge the face of your actual historical figure from Ms. Barben’sPowerpoint to use as your head to have an accurate visual • Thought Bubbles for important beliefs • Speaking Bubbles for famous quotes • T-Shirt Design and Slogan for important beliefs • Items in each hand for important beliefs and impact on the Industrial Revolution • Items under each foot for things they were against • Wearing something on the head relating to important belief • USE HISTORICAL IMAGES WHENEVER YOU CAN TO BE ACCURATE AND SAVE TIME---Must use a MINIMUM OF THREE Visual Primary Sources on the figure • DO IN COLOR

  12. B)______________ In the background, there are additional supplementary images that are realistically and historically appropriate and represent additional key beliefs, characteristics, and events. • Must have a Minimum of FIVE historical aspects addressed in the background • You CANNOT REPEAT CONCEPTS OR INFORMATION! If you do, it will not be counted. • Each historical aspect is worth 6 Points for a total of 30 Points. • Suggestions: • Buildings relating to what they are fighting against and fighting for • Other historical figures they influenced, contradicted, or agreed with • Places and events related to the movement • These should not be random or in collage style. • USE HISTORICAL IMAGES WHENEVER YOU CAN TO BE ACCURATE AND SAVE TIME---Must use a Minimum of THREE Visual Primary Sources in the background. • DO IN COLOR

  13. C)_____________ At the bottom of the caricature, there is a detailed key explaining the symbolism. • Each key description is a minimum of FOUR WELL-DEVELOPED SENTENCES that contains the 5 Ws, How, Causes/Effects, and other Historical Aspects. • This should be numbered and the numbers should match the images on the poster. • Each is worth 8 points for a total of 96 Points. • You need to include specific information/facts like: • Key people in the movement and what they did? • What they were fighting against and why? • What were they fighting for and why? • Strategies used? • Main events of the movement? • Responses of the government? • Effects---short term and long term • Include important statistics • Embed important primary source quotes within your annotations. Must use a MINIMUM OF FIVE within. Only counts as one sentence. • DO NOT WRITE SHORT OR BRIEF SENTENCES. • DO NOT WRITE VAGUE OR GENERAL STATEMENTS. • DO NOT JUST KEEP REPEATING OR REWORDING THE HISTORICAL INFORMATION. If you do, it will not be counted. • This should be TYPED and in Size 12 Font. • It should be attached to the bottom of your poster to hang front-wise for students to read and look at the art part at the same time.

  14. D)______________________The students were well-prepared for the presentation and able to answer any questions raised. All members of the group presented by explaining and expanding upon the material in the project and did not just read from the project. Worth 12 Points. • Comments: Total: /180 Points • Homework: During this lesson you should be working on your Economic Theories Political Cartoon that will be due on:

  15. Wednesday, March 28, 2012 • 2012 Protest and Reform Movements Propaganda Poster Grade Sheet • Due: • Student’s Name: Period: • 1.___________It was turned in on time. If not, it is 10% off each day late:_____________________. • 2.___________The student created a Propaganda Poster for the assigned topic that was historically appropriate. Worth 5 Points. • Luddites: In Support of the Luddites Methods • Luddites: Against the Luddites and their Violent Methods • Unions: Against a Specific Anti-Union Act like the Combination Act or Gagging Act • Unions: In Support of an Anti-Union Act like the Combination Act or Gagging Act • Unions: In Support of the Matchgirls’ Strike • Chartism: In Support of the Chartist Movement Reforming the Voting Process and Giving More Men the Right to Vote • Chartism: Against Giving Working Class Men the Right to Vote • Women’s Suffrage: In Support of the Militant Methods Used by the WSPU • Women’s Suffrage: Against the Use of the Militant Methods Used by the WSPU • Women’s Suffrage: To Give Women the Right to Vote • Women’s Suffrage: Against Giving Women the Right to Vote

  16. Wednesday, March 28, 2012 • 3.__________The student had a clever and persuasive slogan representing the main goals for the topic and was in support of the topic. Worth 10 Points. • 4.___________The student used historical images and primary source quotes from the notes, powerpoints, readings within the poster to add creditability to the historical position. Worth 15 Points. • 5.___________The student used a MINIMUM of TWO related and supportive propaganda strategies in the propaganda poster. Worth 30 Points.

  17. Wednesday, March 28, 2012 • 6.___________The propaganda poster was done in color, neat, organized, and creative. Worth 5 Points. • 7.___________The student wrote a MINIMUM OF THREE TYPED WELL-DEVELOPED PARAGRAPHS examining the propaganda poster. Each paragraph must be a MINIMUM OF SIX WELL-DEVELOPED SENTENCES. Worth 45 Points. • Paragraph One: The student reviewed the main facts about the assigned historical topic. The student defined, explained the key causes and beliefs, identified the key people and groups involved, the goals, and the effects. • Paragraph Two: The student examined the first propaganda strategy used. How was it used in your propaganda poster? Explain why it was used. • Paragraph Three: The student examined the second propaganda strategy used. How was it used in your propaganda poster? Explain why it was used. • 8._________No Excuses: It was typed, spell-checked, grammar-checked, and there were no capitalization errors. • Total-------- /110 Points