slide1
Download
Skip this Video
Download Presentation
WELCOME

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 63

WELCOME - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 160 Views
  • Uploaded on

ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION. CORPORATE SAFETY TRAINING. 29 CFR 1904. WELCOME. YOUR INSTRUCTOR. COURSE OBJECTIVES. NOTE.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'WELCOME' - jaden


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
slide1
ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION

CORPORATE SAFETY TRAINING

29 CFR 1904

WELCOME

slide3
COURSE OBJECTIVES

NOTE

This Course Is Designed to Introduce Basic Skills in Accident Investigation. Root cause analysis and statistical evaluation of accidents can be very complex. This course is designed for the majority of cases that can be diagnosed rapidly and where outside assistance is not normally required.

slide4
COURSE OBJECTIVES

(Continued)

  • Accident Prevention.
  • Introduce Accident Investigation & Establish Its Role in Today’s Industry.
  • Introduce Some Basic Skills in the Recognition & Control of Occupational Hazards.
  • Provide Basic Accident Investigation Skills for Supervisors.
  • Introduce Accident Investigation Techniques.
slide5
BASIS FOR THIS COURSE
  • Statistically, accident investigation results in prevention
  • Elimination of workplace injuries & illnesses where possible
  • Reduction of workplace injuries & illnesses where possible
  • Development of efficient accident investigative procedures
  • OSHA Safety Standards require:
    • Accidents be investigated
    • Training be conducted
    • Hazards and precautions be explained
    • A “Safety” program be established
    • Job Hazards be assessed and controlled
slide6
REGULATORY STANDARD

THE GENERAL DUTY CLAUSE

FEDERAL - 29 CFR 1903.1

EMPLOYERS MUST: Furnish a place of employment free of recognized hazards that are causing or are likely to cause death or serious physical harm to employees. Employers must comply with occupational safety and health standards promulgated under the Williams-Steiger Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970.

OSHA ACT OF 1970

applicable regulations
ACC

IDENT INVESTIGATION

APPLICABLE REGULATIONS

29CFR - SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS

1904 - RECORDKEEPING REQUIREMENTS

applicable regulations8
APPLICABLE REGULATIONS

ANSI - Z16.2 - 1995

INFORMATION MANAGEMENT FOR

OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH

ANSI - Z16.3 - 1994

INJURY STATISTICS, EMPLOYEE OFF THE

JOB INJURY EXPERIENCE RECORDING

AND MEASURING

slide9
DANGER

EYE PROTECTION

REQUIRED BEYOND

THIS POINT

OSHA CIVIL PENALTIES POLICY

BEFORE MARCH 1, 1991:

VIOLATION NARRATIVE: TEN (10) EMPLOYEES WERE NOTED NOT WEARING EYE PROTECTION IN AREAS WHERE A REASONABLE PROBABILITY OF EYE INJURY COULD OCCUR.

PENALTY: $500

slide10
OSHA CIVIL PENALTIES POLICY

(Continued)

AS OF MARCH 1, 1991:

CHANGES IN PENALTY COMPUTATION:

1. PENALTIES BROKEN OUT INDIVIDUALLY.

2. PENALTIES INCREASED SEVEN FOLD.

slide11
OSHA CIVIL PENALTIES POLICY

(Continued)

  • AS OF MARCH 1, 1991:
  • VIOLATION NARRATIVE: TEN (10) EMPLOYEES WERE
  • NOTED NOT WEARING EYE PROTECTION IN AREAS
  • WHERE A REASONABLE PROBABILITY OF EYE
  • INJURY COULD OCCUR.
  • 10 VIOLATIONS TIMES $500 = $5000
  • 5000 TIMES SEVEN = $35,000
  • PENALTY: $35000 BEFORE MARCH, 1991: $500
  • AS OF MARCH, 1991: $35,000
slide12
ACCIDENT

INVESTIGATION

PROGRAM

ACC

IDENT INVESTIGATION

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

ALL EMPLOYERS MUST:

  • Review job specific hazards
  • Implement corrective actions
  • Conduct hazard assessments
  • Conduct accident investigations
  • Provide training to all required employees
  • Install engineering controls where possible
  • Institute administrative controls where possible
  • Control workplace hazards using PPE as a last resort
accident investigation is important
Improve quality.

Improve absenteeism.

Maintain a healthier work force.

Reduce injury and illness rates.

Acceptance of high-turnover jobs.

Workers feel good about their work.

Reduce workers’ compensation costs.

Elevate SAFETY to a higher level of awareness.

SAFETY

STATISTICS

ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION IS IMPORTANT

A GOOD PROGRAM WILL HELP:

accident investigation is also prevention
ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION IS ALSO PREVENTION

“It is estimated that in the United States, 97% of the money spent for medical care is directed toward treatment of an illness, injury or disability. Only 3% is spent on prevention.”

Self-Help Manual For Your Back

H. Duane Saunders, MSPT

by Educational Opportunities

program implementation
DEDICATION

PERSONAL INTEREST

MANAGEMENT COMMITMENT

PROGRAM IMPLEMENTATION

IMPLEMENTATION OF AN ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION PROGRAM REQUIRES:

NOTE:

UNDERSTANDING AND SUPPORT FROM THE WORK FORCE

IS ESSENTIAL, WITHOUT IT THE PROGRAM WILL FAIL!

key program elements
TRAINING

SAFETY COMMITTEE

WORKSITE ANALYSIS

STATISTICAL REVIEWS

MEDICAL MANAGEMENT

PROMPT INVESTIGATIONS

SUPERVISOR INVOLVEMENT

HAZARD PREVENTION AND CONTROL

KEY PROGRAM ELEMENTS
key program elements continued
WORKSITE ANALYSIS

RECORDS REVIEW

PERIODIC SURVEYS

JOB HAZARD ANALYSIS

SYSTEMATIC SITE ANALYSIS

SAF

ETY

KEY PROGRAM ELEMENTS(Continued)
key program elements continued18
SAFETY COMMITTEE

GOAL SETTING

WRITTEN PROGRAM

EMPLOYEE INVOLVEMENT

REGULAR PROGRAM ACTIVITY

TOP MANAGEMENT COMMITMENT

PERIODIC PROGRAM REVIEW AND EVALUATION

KEY PROGRAM ELEMENTS(Continued)
key program elements continued19
HAZARD PREVENTION AND CONTROL

PPE REDUCTION

ENGINEERING CONTROLS

ADMINISTRATIVE CONTROLS

OPTIMIZATION OF WORK PRACTICES

DANGER

EYE PROTECTION

REQUIRED BEYOND

THIS POINT

KEY PROGRAM ELEMENTS(Continued)
management s role
CONSIDERATIONS:MANAGEMENT’S ROLE
  • 1. SUPPORT THE PROCESS.
  • 2. ENSURE YOUR SUPPORT IS VISIBLE.
  • 3. GET INVOLVED.
  • 4. ATTEND THE SAME TRAINING AS YOUR WORKERS.
  • 5. INSIST ON PERIODIC FOLLOW-UP & PROGRAM REVIEW.
  • 6. IMPLEMENT WAYS TO MEASURE EFFECTIVENESS.
the supervisor s role
CONSIDERATIONS:THE SUPERVISOR’S ROLE
  • 1. TREAT ALL “NEAR-MISSES” AS AN ACCIDENT.
  • 2. GET INVOLVED IN THE INVESTIGATION.
  • 3. COMPLETE THE PAPERWORK (WORK ORDERS, POLICY
  • CHANGES, ETC.) TO MAKE CORRECTIVE ACTIONS.
  • 4. GET YOUR WORKERS INVOLVED.
  • 5. NEVER RIDICULE ANY INJURY.
  • 6. BE PROFESSIONAL - YOU COULD SAVE A LIFE TODAY.
  • 7. ATTEND THE SAME TRAINING AS YOUR WORKERS.
  • 8. FOLLOW-UP ON THE ACTIONS YOU TOOK.
the employee s role
CONSIDERATIONS:THE EMPLOYEE’S ROLE
  • 1. REPORT ALL ACCIDENTS AND NEAR-MISSES IMMEDIATELY.
  • 2. CONTRIBUTE TO MAKE CORRECTIVE ACTIONS.
  • 3. ALWAYS PROVIDE COMPLETE AND ACCURATE INFORMATION.
  • 4. FOLLOW-UP WITH ANY ADDITIONAL INFORMATION.
written program
WRITTEN PROGRAMS MUST BE:

DEVELOPED

IMPLEMENTED

CONTROLLED

PERIODICALLY REVIEWED

WRITTEN PROGRAM
slide24
Hold regular accident review meetings.

Document meetings.

Encourage employee involvement.

Bring employee complaints, suggestions, or

concerns to the attention of management.

Feedback without fear of reprisal should be provided.

Analyze statistical data concerning accidents, and make recommendations for corrective action.

Follow-up is critical.

SAFETY COMMITTEE

COMMITTEES SHOULD:

program review and evaluation
Analysis of trends in injury/illness rates.

Job hazard analysis assessments.

Employee surveys.

Review of results of facility evaluations.

Up-to-date records of job improvements tried or implemented.

Before and after surveys/evaluations of job/worksite changes.

PROGRAM REVIEW AND EVALUATION

EVALUATION TECHNIQUES INCLUDE:

industrial hygiene controls
INDUSTRIAL HYGIENE CONTROLS
  • ENGINEERING CONTROLS FIRST CHOICE
    •  Work Station Design  Tool Selection and Design
    •  Process Modification  Mechanical Assist
  •  ADMINISTRATIVE CONTROLS SECOND CHOICE
    •  Training Programs  Job Rotation/Enlargement
    •  Pacing  Policy and Procedures
  •  PERSONNEL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT LAST CHOICE
    •  Gloves  Wraps
    •  Shields  Eye Protection
    •  Non-Slip Shoes  Aprons
accident causation
Domino Theory.

Multiple Causation Theory.

ACCIDENT CAUSATION
accident causation28
Domino Theory.ACCIDENT CAUSATION

The occurrence of an injury invariably results from a completed sequence of factors, the last one of these being the injury itself. The accident which caused the injury is in turn invariably caused or permitted directly by the unsafe act of a person and/or a mechanical or physical hazard.

accident causation29
The unsafe act: Climbing a defective ladder.

The unsafe condition: A defective ladder.

The corrective action 1: Replace the ladder.

The corrective action 2: Forbid use of ladder.

ACCIDENT CAUSATION
  • Domino Theory.
  • (One act or condition)
accident causation30
ACCIDENT CAUSATION
  • Multiple Causation Theory.

Factors combined in random fashion to cause accidents.

accident causation31
Was he or she properly trained?

Was he or she reminded not to use it?

Did the employee know not to use it?

Why did the supervisor allow its use?

Did the supervisor examine the job first?

Why was the defective ladder not found?

ACCIDENT CAUSATION
  • Multiple Causation Theory.
  • (Contributing factors)
accident causation32
Horseplay.

Defeating safety devices.

Failure to secure or warn.

Operating without authority.

Working on moving equipment.

Taking an unsafe position or posture.

Operating or working at an unsafe speed.

Unsafe loading, placing, mixing, combining.

Failure to use personal protective equipment.

ACCIDENT CAUSATION
  • Unsafe Acts
accident causation33
Improper PPE.

Improper tools.

Improper guarding.

Poor housekeeping.

Improper ventilation.

Defective equipment.

Improper illumination.

Unsafe dress or apparel.

Hazardous arrangement.

ACCIDENT CAUSATION
  • Unsafe Conditions (Environmental)
accident causation34
Fatigue.

Unclassified

Improper attitude.

Defective hearing.

Defective eyesight.

Muscular weakness.

Lack of required skill.

Intoxication (alcohol, drugs).

Lack of required knowledge

ACCIDENT CAUSATION
  • Unsafe Personal Factors
accident causation35
Improper attitude.

Lack of knowledge or skill.

Physical or mental impairment

ACCIDENT CAUSATION
  • Behavioristic Causes
accident causation36
Slip, Trip.

Struck by.

Overexertion.

Struck against.

Fall on same level.

Fall to different level.

Caught in, on, or between.

Contact with - heat or cold.

Contact with - electric current.

Inhalation, absorption, ingestion, poisoning.

ACCIDENT CAUSATION
  • Types of Accidents
accident causation37
Accident type.

Nature of injury.

Source of the injury.

Location of accident.

Hazardous condition.

Affected part of body.

ACCIDENT CAUSATION
  • Key Facts
accident causation38
Nationality.

Language.

Occupation.

Gender.

Department.

Name of supervisor.

Years employed.

Length of time on job.

ACCIDENT CAUSATION
  • Assessing the Facts
  • Responsibility.
  • Age.
  • Type of accident.
  • Environmental cause.
  • Unsafe act.
  • Behavioristic cause.
  • Cost.
  • Time lost.
accident causation39
1. Obtain the supervisor report of the accident.

2. Obtain the injured worker’s report (if possible).

3. Obtain reports from witnesses, if any.

4. Investigate the accident.

5. Record all the facts.

6. Assess the specifics of the accident.

7. Correlate the specifics with known trends.

8. Determine a course of action to take.

9. Assign responsibility for corrective action.

10. Follow-up as required.

ACCIDENT CAUSATION
  • Steps in Causal Analysis
accident reporting
ACCIDENT REPORTING
  • WHAT SHOULD BE REPORTED:
  • All injuries or job-related illnesses.
  • Near-miss incidents.
  • Vehicular, structural or equipment damage.
  • Procedural deficiencies.
  • Potentially unsafe conditions.
  • Potentially unsafe behaviors.
conducting the investigation
Determine principal causes.

Determine contributing causes.

Develop strategies for corrective action.

Establish a timetable for corrective action.

Assign responsibility for corrective actions.

CONDUCTING THE INVESTIGATION
  • Purpose of the Investigation:
conducting the investigation42
CONDUCTING THE INVESTIGATION

Continued

  • Collecting the data:
  • JHA assessment forms.
  • Direct observation.
  • Video Tape.
  • Action photographs.
  • Documentary accounts.
  • Accident statistics.
  • Employee interviews.
  • Employee surveys.
conducting the investigation43
SAFETY

STATISTICS

CONDUCTING THE INVESTIGATION

Continued

  • TANGIBLE INDICATORS:
  • Accident Records
  • Production Records
  • Personnel Records
  • Employee Surveys
conducting the investigation44
CONDUCTING THE INVESTIGATION

Continued

  • TEAM COMPOSITION:
  • Supervisor.
  • Safety officer.
  • Maintenance.
  • Field experts (if needed).
  • Care provider (if needed).
  • Injured employee (if possible).
  • Who else can you think of that may be needed?
conducting the investigation45
CONDUCTING THE INVESTIGATION

Continued

  • PRINCIPAL QUESTIONS TO BE ANSWERED:
  • WHO?
  • WHAT?
  • WHY?
  • WHEN?
  • WHERE?
  • HOW?
conducting the investigation46
CONDUCTING THE INVESTIGATION

Continued

WHO?

  • Who was injured?
  • Who was working with him/her?
  • Who else witnessed the accident?
  • Who else was involved in the accident?
  • Who is the employee's immediate supervisor?
  • Who rendered first aid or medical treatment?
conducting the investigation47
CONDUCTING THE INVESTIGATION

Continued

WHAT?

  • What was the injured employee’s explanation?
  • What were they doing at the time of the accident?
  • What was the position at the time of the accident?
  • What is the exact nature of the injury?
  • What operation was being performed?
  • What materials were being used?
  • What safe-work procedures were provided?
conducting the investigation48
CONDUCTING THE INVESTIGATION

Continued

WHAT?

  • What personal protective equipment was used?
  • What PPE was required?
  • What elements could have contributed?
  • What guards were available but not used?
  • What environmental conditions contributed?
  • What related safety procedures need revision?
  • What shift was the employee working?
  • What ergonomic factors were involved?
conducting the investigation49
CONDUCTING THE INVESTIGATION

Continued

WHEN?

  • When did the accident occur?
  • When did the employee start his/her shift?
  • When did the employee begin employment?
  • When was job-specific training received?
  • When did the supervisor last visit the job?
conducting the investigation50
CONDUCTING THE INVESTIGATION

Continued

WHY?

  • Why did the accident occur?
  • Why did the employee do what he/she did?
  • Why did co-workers do what they did?
  • Why did conditions come together at that moment?
  • Why was the employee in the specific position?
  • Why were the specific tool/equipment selected?
conducting the investigation51
CONDUCTING THE INVESTIGATION

Continued

WHERE?

  • Where did the accident occur?
  • Where was the employee positioned?
  • Where were eyewitnesses positioned?
  • Where was the supervisor at the time?
  • Where was first aid initially given?
conducting the investigation52
CONDUCTING THE INVESTIGATION

Continued

HOW?

  • How did the accident occur?
  • How many hours had the employee worked?
  • How did the employee get injured (specifically)?
  • How could the injury have been avoided?
  • How could witnesses have prevented it?
  • How could witnesses have better helped?
  • HOW COULD THE COMPANY HAVE PREVENTED IT?
conducting the investigation53
CONDUCTING THE INVESTIGATION

Continued

WHAT'S NEXT?

  • Instruct employee in proper behavior?
  • Warn employee of potential hazard?
  • Supply appropriate safeguard?
  • Supply appropriate PPE?
  • Eliminate the unsafe condition?
  • Repair or modify the unsafe condition?
  • Implement procedural changes?
conducting the investigation54
CONDUCTING THE INVESTIGATION

Continued

  • INTERVIEWING WITNESSES:
  • Select a comfortable, private location.
  • Set the person at ease.
  • Explain that the situation, not them is the focus.
  • Solicit ideas to prevent future recurrence.
  • Consider diagrams or drawings.
  • Remain neutral in your demeanor.
  • Take notes or record the discussion.
  • Review the statements before terminating.
writing the report
WRITING THE REPORT
  • REPRESENTING THE DATA:
  • Condense into the company accident form.
  • Compile statistical data for representation.
  • Assign responsibility and prioritize.
  • Make recommendations for correction.
  • Recommend a timetable for correction.
  • Consider funding for corrective actions.
  • Forward copies to OSHA as required.
  • Distribute internally as required.
  • Follow-up at periodic intervals.
writing the report56
WRITING THE REPORT

Continued

FORMULATING CONTROL MEASURES

  • TRAINING INITIATION OR ENHANCEMENT
  • ELIMINATE OR REDUCE EXPOSURE
  • ENGINEERING CONTROL MEASURES
  • ADMINISTRATIVE CONTROL MEASURES
  • APPLICATION OF SAFE WORK PRACTICES
  • PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT
follow up
FOLLOW-UP

THE GREATEST DEFICIENCY IN ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION IS LACK OF COMPETENT FOLLOW-UP!

incidence rates
INCIDENCE RATE CALCULATION: Incidence rates can be calculated by counting the incidences and reporting the recordable injuries per 100 full time workers per year per facility.

(NUMBER OF NEW CASES X 200,000*)

NUMBER OF HOURS WORKED/FACILITY/YEAR

INCIDENCE RATES

* 200,000 = Approximate annual work hours for 100 workers per facility.

* The same method can be applied to departments production lines, or

job types with each facility.

job design
REDUCES

Discomfort, Fatigue, Aches & Pains

Injuries & Illnesses, Work Restrictions

AVOIDS

Absenteeism, Turnover, Complaints,

Poor Performance, Poor Vigilance

ABATES

Accidents, Production Problems,

Poor Quality, Scrap/Rework

JOB DESIGN

GOOD JOB DESIGN

job design60
JOB DESIGN

Continued

GOOD JOB DESIGN

EMPLOYEE:

PREVENTS

Economic Loss, Loss in Earning Power,

Loss in Quality of Life, Pain & Suffering

EMPLOYER:

PREVENTS

Economic Loss, Loss in Expertise,

Compensation Costs, Damaged Goods

& Equipment

slide61
TIPS FOR USING CONTRACTORS
  • REMEMBER, YOU CONTROL YOUR FACILITY OR AREA!
  • REVIEW THEIR PROCEDURES WITH THEM BEFORE
  • STARTING THE JOB!
  • DETERMINE THEIR SAFETY PERFORMANCE RECORD!
  • DETERMINE WHO IS IN CHARGE OF THEIR PEOPLE!
  • DETERMINE HOW THEY WILL AFFECT YOUR EMPLOYEES!
slide62
OSHA'S PERCEPTION

OF A SUCCESSFUL PROGRAM

1. DETAILED WRITTEN REPORTS.

2. DETAILED WRITTEN PROCEDURES

3. EXTENSIVE EMPLOYEE TRAINING PROGRAMS

4. PERIODIC REINFORCEMENT OF TRAINING

5. DISCIPLINED PROGRAM IMPLEMENTATION

6. FOLLOW-UP

slide63
WORK AT WORKING SAFELY

Training is the key to success in managing safety in the work environment. Attitude is also a key factor in maintaining a safe workplace. Safety is, and always will be a team effort, safety starts with each individual employee and concludes with everyone leaving at the end of the day to rejoin their families.

Patricia A. Ice

Industrial Hygienist

ad