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Pop-Up Book Making: A Visual Arts and Language Arts Integration

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  1. Pop-Up Book Making: A Visual Arts and Language Arts Integration By: Mindy J. Kessler Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Cathy Smilan

  2. Research • Integrating visual arts with other subjects facilitates learning and aids cognitive development through sensory stimulation. (Lackey, 2003; Andrzejczak, 2005; Althouse, 2003; Irwin, Kind, Grauer, & de Cosson, 2005)

  3. Integration • The integration of visual arts and language arts can help students build their writing and communication skills. (Johnson, 1992)

  4. Sunshine State Standards Visual Arts K-2 • (VA.B.1.1.4) Uses the elements of art and the principles of design to effectively communicate ideas. Language Arts K-2 • (LA.B.1.1.2)Drafts and revises simple sentences and passages, stories, letters, and simple explanations that: express ideas clearly; show an awareness of topic and audience; have a beginning, middle, and ending; effectively use common words; have supporting detail; and are in legible printing.

  5. Visual Arts and Language Arts Similarities • Viewing a piece of artwork encourages spoken or written words. • Reading a story evokes images in one’s mind provoked by the text.

  6. Strategies for Integration • There are many strategies to increase students’ language development by integrating these two subjects. • Bookmaking is one strategy.

  7. Bookmaking: Pop-up Books Effective educational tools • Interactive • Provide prompts or inspirational doorways • Students respond by writing about their observations and interpretations. • Alternative assessment

  8. Benefits to Teachers • Bookmaking persuades students to write thoughts and information prompted from the cuts and folds making the experience memorable. • When students begin creating a book, the desire to fill it up with writing and images encourages them to persevere until they have completed the project.

  9. Assessment • Teacher observation during studio time • Students assess own work • Group critique • Rubric: Assesses students’ ability to satisfy lesson objectives using criteria that determines how well their project demonstrates what they have learned.

  10. Conclusion Value of Bookmaking • Arts integration increases students' knowledge of the visual arts and the language arts. • Increases their intrinsic motivation to learn.

  11. Materials • Paper: • All sizes/colors – (card stock is best) • Scissors • Glue • Ruler • String • Crayons • Markers

  12. Examples

  13. References • Althouse, R. (2003). The colors of learning: Integrating the visual arts into the early childhood curriculum. New York, NY: Teachers College Press. • Andrzejczak, N., Trainin, G., & Poldberg, M. (2005). From image to text: Using images in the writing process. International Journal of Education & the Arts, 6(12). Retrieved 7/15/06 from http://ijea.asu.edu/v6n12/ • Blasingame, J., Erickson, M., & Woodson, L., 2005. In Stockrocki, M (Ed.). (2005). Interdisciplinary art education: Building bridges to connect disciplines and cultures, pp. 199-210. Reston, VA: National Art Education Association. • Efland, A. (2002). Art and cognition. New York, NY: Teachers College Press. • Irwin, R., Kind, S. W., Grauer, K., & de Cosson, A., 2005. In Stockrocki, M (Ed.). (2005). Interdisciplinary art education: Building bridges to connect disciplines and cultures, pp. 199-210. Reston, VA: National Art Education Association. • Johnson, P. (1992). A book of one’s own: Developing literacy through making books. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann Educational Books, Inc. • Lackey, L., 2005. In Stockrocki, M (Ed.). (2005). Interdisciplinary art education: Building bridges to connect disciplines and cultures, pp. 199-210. Reston, VA: National Art Education Association. • http://www.library.unt.edu/rarebooks/exhibits/popup2/introduction.htm • http://www.vickiblackwell.com/makingbooks/index.htm • http://www.markhiner.co.uk/producing.htm • http://www.makingbooks.com/workshops2.shtml • http://www.beetlelady.com/?page_id=10

  14. Other Bookmaking Books • Caraway, Georgia. "The Story of the Tuck Postcards." Denton Record-Chronicle 1 May 2000. • Haining, Peter. Movable Books: An Illustrated History. London: New English Library, 1979. • Johnson, Paul. (1992). Pop-Up Paper Engineering: Cross-Curricular Activities in Design Engineering Technology, English and Art. Philadelphia PA: The Falmer Press. • Lindberg, Sten G. "Mobiles in Books: Volvelles, Inserts, Pyramids, Divinations, and Children's Games." Trans. Willian S. Mitchell. The Private Library 3rd series 2.2 (1979) : 49-82. • Montanaro, Ann R. Pop-up and Movable Books: A Bibliography. Metuchen, N.J.: Scarecrow Press, 1993. • Vries, Leonard de. A Treasury of Illustrated Children's Books: Early Nineteenth-Century Classics from the Osborne Collection. 1st ed. New York: Abbeville Press, 1989. • Whitton, Blair. Paper Toys of the World. Cumberland, Md.: Hobby House Press, 1986. • Bohning, Gerry, & Phillips, Ann. (1993). Literature on the Move: Making and Using Pop-Up and Lift-Flap Books. Teacher Ideas Press.