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Partnership exploration

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  1. Partnership exploration April_2010

  2. Partnership exploration within the partnering process ($) cost centre EXPLORATORY WORKSHOP ($) April_2010

  3. Partnership exploration components BUILDING A VISION IDENTIFICATION and DIALOGUE with PARTNERS MAPPING RESOURCES PARTNERSHIP BUILDING WORKSHOP ($) April_2010

  4. Building a common vision • The initial partners: • identify the needs and challenges • discuss whether a national partnership could address these issues - SWOT analysis • if yes, outline clear vision, goal and objectives • outline the value added of the national partnership through discussing the real motivation PARTNERSHIP HAS A CLEAR VISION AND ADDED VALUE See tool 1 April_2010

  5. 1. SWOT analysis on building a national stop TB partnership Internal External April_2010

  6. Example of SWOT analysis on building a national stop TB partnership Internal External April_2010

  7. 2. Vision, goal, objective The initial partners outline: • Vision: the ideal situation the partners would like to see become real in the future • Goal: an agreed development aspiration which refers to broad changes that are beyond the capacity of any organization to bring about alone (long-term) • Objective: the change to which the partnership is committed and which contributes to the achievement of the goal (medium-term) April_2010

  8. Example vision, goal, objectives • Vision: a given country free of tuberculosis. • Goal: to strengthen TB prevention, care and control in a given country towards the targets of the Global Plan to Stop TB, in close collaboration with the national TB control programme (NTP) and with the support, if needed, of the Global Stop TB Partnership secretariat. • Objectives: • To contribute to the implementation of the national strategic plan to control TB by harnessing the contribution of all stakeholders, including health service providers. April_2010

  9. 3. Value added - motivation • The operational challenges of TB control and the social aspects of the disease demand a joint effort of institutions and civil society. • While governments are responsible for ensuring services reach the people in need, different actors (civil society and private/business sector) are often involved in the delivery of service. • Governments can recognize and support as part of the public system other actors that institutionally do not belong to the state ("public function of private initiative"). • Engagement of civil society is essential to design, implement and evaluate people-centred health services. April_2010

  10. Possible benefits • Coordination and common strategy • Multi-sector participation • Increased canalization of resources (technical, financial, physical, human, networking) • Active leadership • Social capital April_2010

  11. Partnership exploration components BUILDING A VISION IDENTIFICATION and DIALOGUE with PARTNERS MAPPING RESOURCES PARTNERSHIP BUILDING WORKSHOP ($) April_2010

  12. Identification of relevant partners • The initial partners: • identify and assess relevant partners • promote a dialogue about the vision, goal and planned objectives as well as their motivation and commitment • explore complementarities and synergies See tool 2 CORE GROUP OF INTERESTED PARTNERS April_2010

  13. A list to help identifying relevant partners Within the Ministry of Health: • managers from various administrative levels of the TB control programme; • programme managers and technical staff from supporting programmes, services, departments dealing with human resources, health statistics, health finance, drug control, health education, environmental health, etc. Outside the Ministry of Health: • other ministries (education, social welfare, labour, industry, environment), both politicians and civil servants; • local and international nongovernmental organizations; • faith-based organizations; • representatives from patient groups; • representatives from the communities; • potential partners in providing technical and financial support such as multilateral and bilateral agencies; • representatives from professional associations; • TB experts (TB and lung associations) and public health experts from academic and training faculties; • representatives from the private/business sector; • representatives from the media; • representatives from the educational sector, youth and sport associations; • traditional healers; • prisons/military; • women's group; • public/national champion(s), well-known, influential personality/ies. April_2010

  14. 2. Process to help initial partners identifying relevant partners Find out if the relevant partner has: • A good track record? • Reasonable respect within its sector? • Reasonable respect from other sectors and key players? • Useful contacts ready to be shared? • Access to relevant information/resources/competences/skills? • Sound management and governance structure? • A record of financial stability and reliability? • A stable staff group? Using: • Research (web site, fact finding visit, asking others) • One-to-one consultation April_2010

  15. 2. Process to help initial partners identifying relevant partners You want to find out: • Whether the relevant partner has a motivation and is committed to a partnership approach: • Whether the relevant partner has a strategic interest for engaging in the partnership? • How a partnership approach will add value to achieve the partner's strategic interest? • Whether the relevant partner would share the proposed vision, goal and objectives • How the relevant partner could contribute to the partnership given its specific identity (information/resources/competences/skills) • Whether it is worth to continue the dialogue or it is better to stop the dialogue April_2010

  16. Partnership exploration components BUILDING A VISION IDENTIFICATION and DIALOGUE with PARTNERS MAPPING RESOURCES PARTNERSHIP BUILDING WORKSHOP ($) April_2010

  17. Mapping resources • The core group of interested partners: • collects information on services already provided by prospective partners (activities, competences, resources) • summarizes all collected information in a summary sheet that matches the information on prospective partners against the national TB plan (services/tasks) and different geographic areas See tool 3 RESOURCE MAP April_2010

  18. Form to collect information on services already provided by partners April_2010

  19. Summary sheet task/partner/competence April_2010

  20. Summary sheet on task/partner/geographic area April_2010

  21. ($) Exploratory workshops Initial partners will decide: • Who: • will develop the idea? • are the relevant partners to be invited? • will send out the invitations? • When: • the date should be well thought and • communicated to all participants well in advance • What: • Will be discussed: goal, objectives, expected outputs of the workshop • Will be the roles of the partners? • Will be the design: small-group, large group, open-ended discussion • Where: • Impersonal location • Location associated with a partner • How: • Different roles: host, facilitator/moderator, rapporteur/record keeper, support team, translator • Seating: theatre style, semi-circle, circle, cafè style around small tables • Cost: • In-kind: offered by one of the partners • External funds (international funding mechanism) • Self-sustained: participants are asked to pay a fee April_2010