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Figurative Language. By S. Huffman. Simile. Comparison of two unlike things using the words “like” or “as” “My Mistress’s eyes are nothing like the sun…” by William Shakespeare “All song of the woods is crushed like some Wild, easily shattered rose” from “A Line-Storm Song by Robert Frost.

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figurative language

Figurative Language

By S. Huffman

simile
Simile
  • Comparison of two unlike things using the words “like” or “as”
  • “My Mistress’s eyes are nothing like the sun…” by William Shakespeare
  • “All song of the woods is crushed like some Wild, easily shattered rose” from “A Line-Storm Song by Robert Frost
metaphor
Metaphor
  • Comparison between two unlike things, without using “like” or “as”
  • Direct Metaphor: makes a comparison using a form of the verb “to be” (am, is, are, was, etc.)

“For if dreams die/Life is a broken-winged bird/that cannot fly” from “Dreams” by Langston Hughes

  • Implied Metaphor: A metaphor that compares without using a form of the verb “to be”

“The line-storm clouds fly tattered and swift” from “A Line-Storm Song” by Robert Frost

metaphor cont
Metaphor, cont.
  • Extended Metaphor: a metaphor that extends into the sentences to follow, often developed to great extent

“your slightest look easily will unclose me though i have closed myself as fingers, you open always petal by petal myself as Spring opens(touching skillfully, mysteriously)her first rose” from “somewhere i have never travelled, gladly beyond” by E.E. Cummings

personification
Personification
  • Giving human characteristics to non-human things/animals
  • “The road is forlorn all day” from “A Line-Storm Song” by Robert Frost
  • “The birds have less to say for themselves” from “A Line-Storm Song” by Robert Frost
metonymy
Metonymy
  • When one word is substituted for another closely related word
  • Using “crown” for “royalty”
  • “The pen is mightier than the sword”
synecdoche
Synecdoche
  • A figure of speech that refers to a part of something that is used to refer to the whole
  • Opposite of metonymy
  • “Would you give me a hand” when you mean “please help me…”
repetition
Repetition
  • When an author repeats a word or phrase to emphasize ideas
  • I love thee freely, as men strive for right./ I love thee purely, as they turn from praise./ I love thee with the passion put to use/In my old griefs, and with my childhood's faith. From “Sonnet 43” by Elizabeth Barrett Browning