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Part-Time Working Mothers’ Information Behavior
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  1. Part-Time Working Mothers’ Information Behavior by Kelly Sitzman

  2. Part-Time Working Mothers (PTWM) • Who are they? • Women with children under the age of 18 • Work less than 40 hours per week • Make up a large percentage of the American workforce • Why work? • Generate income • Feel accomplished • Get away from demands of home life • Find balance between work & family

  3. Questions about PTWM • How do they find information about work and family? • In what ways do they balance their time between work and family? • Does working part-time allow for more freedom in searching for information? • What information do they value? • So many questions, so few answers.

  4. (Lack of) PTWM in Literature Working Mothers • Most literature focuses on: • full-time working mothers (breadwinner) • stay-at-home mothers (caregiver) • Trends show mothers are less interested in working full-time

  5. Findings of PTWM in Literature • Mothers working in clerical or “earner-type positions” were more likely to be depressed than those working in careers • Comparisons & contrasts of values and attitudes of stay-at-home mothers and full-time working mothers • Examined roles & definitions of home • 3.0 approach to technology • Lack of support for stay-at-home mothers

  6. Julie: Behavior of a PTWM • Meet Julie: • 33 year-old mother of 2 year-old twin boys • Works part-time as office manager of small local office • Informational values • Researched full-time work vs. stay-at-home vs. part-time work • Current news stories from computer or phone • Recipes & craft ideas from computer or phone • General information from friends and family • Does not value • Information about child care (too subjective and always changing) • Social networking • Additional Information • Organizes personal schedule on paper materials • Does not feel unsupported or isolated • Finding a balance between work and family is most important

  7. Findings & Future Research • Findings • Information values • No 3.0 approach to technology • No isolationor depression • Does not lack support • Balance!! • Future Research • PTWM in 5 to 10 years • Working mothers are currently a significant part of America’s workforce • Continued increase in preference of part-time work over full-time

  8. PTWM= Potential! • Potential Outreach • PTWM as library patrons • Shape library services to better fit this group • Information Gaps • Compare to full-time or stay-at-home • Larger sample group • More Studies! • Untapped resource

  9. References • Dillaway, H, and E Paré. 2008. “Locating Mothers: How Cultural Debates About Stay-At-Home Versus Working Mothers Define Women and Home.” Journal Of Family Issues 29, no. 4: 437-464. CINAHL Plus with Full Text, EBSCOhost (accessed October 23, 2013). • Higgins, Christopher, Linda Duxbury, and Karen Lea Johnson. 2000. “Part-Time Work for Women: Does It Really Help Balance Work and Family?” Human Resource Management 39, no. 1: 17-32. CINAHL Plus with Full Text,EBSCOhost (accessed October 23, 2013). • Johnston, Deirdre, and Debra H. Swanson. 2004. “Moms Hating Moms: ‘Ike Internalization of Mother War Rhetoric.’” Sex Roles 51, no. 9/10: 497-509. Academic Search Premier,EBSCOhost (accessed October 23, 2013). • Lee, Charlotte P., and Ciaran B. Trace. 2009. “The Role of Information in a Community of Hobbyist Collectors.” Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology 60, no. 3: 621-637. • Mullan, Eileen. 2009. "Mom 3.0: Marketing to High-Tech Moms." Econtent 32, no. 2: 14-15. Library Literature & Information Science Full Text (H.W. Wilson), EBSCOhost (accessed October 21, 2013). • Nwagwu, Williams E., and Mary O. Segilola. 2013. “Information Needs, Information Sources, and Information Seeking Behaviours of Engineers in Breweries in Nigeria.” Libri: International Journal of Libraries & Information Services 63, no. 2: 159-178. Library Literature & Information Science Full Text (H.W. Wilson), EBSCOhost (accessed November 3, 2013). • Tardy, Rebecca W., and Claudia L. Hale. 1998. “Getting ‘Plugged in’: A Network Analysis of Health-Information Seeking Among ‘Stay-At-Home Moms.’” Communication Monographs 65, no. 4: 336.Communication & Mass Media Complete, EBSCOhost (accessed October 23, 2013). • Taylor, Paul, Cary Funk, and April Clark. 2007. “Fewer Mothers Prefer Full-time Work.” Pew Research Center 1-13. Accessed October 23, 2013. http://www.pewresearch.org/files/old-assets/social/pdf/WomenWorking.pdf. • Wang, Wendy, Kim Parker, and Paul Taylor. 2013. “Breadwinner Moms.” Pew Research Social & Demographic Trends. Accessed October 23, 2013. http://www.pewsocialtrends.org/2013/05/29/breadwinner-moms/