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Twelve Angry Men (Part Two)

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  1. Lesson 6 Twelve Angry Men(Part Two) Book 3 Reginald Rose

  2. Lesson 6 Part One: Warm-upPart Two: Background InformationPart Three: Text AppreciationPart Four: Language Study Part Five: Extension Book 3 Contents W B T L E

  3. Lesson 6 – Twelve Angry Men (Part Two) Warm-up Part One ENTER

  4. Lesson 6 – Twelve Angry Men (Part Two) On justice The whole history of the world is summed up in the fact that, when nations are strong, they are not always just, and when they wish to be just, they are no longer strong. —Winston Churchill 世界的整个历史可以归结为这个事实: 一个国家强大时就不太公正, 而当他们希望求得公正时, 就不再强大。 —丘吉尔 To be continued on the next page.

  5. Lesson 6 – Twelve Angry Men (Part Two) On justice I have always found that mercy bears richer fruits than strict justice. —Abraham Lincoln Courage is of no value unless accompanied by justice; yet if all men became just, there would be no need for courage. —Agesilaus the Second To be continued on the next page.

  6. Lesson 6 – Twelve Angry Men (Part Two) On justice It is in justice that the ordering of society is centered. —Aristotle Justice is the constant and perpetual will to allot to every man his due. —Domitus Ulpian If it were not for injustice, men would not know justice. —Heraclitus To be continued on the next page.

  7. Lesson 6 – Twelve Angry Men (Part Two) On justice Justice consists not in being neutral between right and wrong, but in finding out the right and upholding it, wherever found, against the wrong. —Theodore Roosevelt Justice delayed, is justice denied. —William Galdstone The end of On justice.

  8. Lesson 6 – Twelve Angry Men (Part two) Part Two Background Information ENTER

  9. Lesson 6 – Twelve Angry Men (Part two) Background information Contents • Judges • Court working dresses in England and Wales

  10. Lesson 6 – Twelve Angry Men (Part two) • Judges A judge or justice is an appointed or elected official who presides over a court. The powers, functions, and training of judges varies widely from jurisdiction to jurisdiction. In USA, judges are not trained separately from lawyers and are generally appointed or elected from among practicing attorneys. A professional person authorized to practice law; conducts lawsuits or gives legal advice To be continued on the next page.

  11. Lesson 6 – Twelve Angry Men (Part two) • Judges Being a judge is usually a prestigious position in society, and as a result a variety of solemn traditions have become associated with the occupation. In most nations of the world judges wear long robes, usually black or red, and sit on an elevated platform during trials. The standard judges uniform originated with the Roman toga.In some countries, notably Britain, judges also wear long wigs and use special gavels to instill order in the courtroom.In the People’s Republic of China, judges wore regular street clothes until 1984, when they began to wear military style uniforms, which were intended to demonstrate authority. These uniforms were replaced in 2000 by black robes similar to those in the rest of the world. Symbols of office To be continued on the next page.

  12. Lesson 6 – Twelve Angry Men (Part two) • Judges In most English speaking countries (particularly the USA) a judge is addressed as "Your Honor" when presiding over the judge's court, as a sign of respect for the office. The judges of the Supreme Court of the United States, and the judges of the supreme courts of several U. S. states and other countries are called “justices”. In the United Kingdom, a comparable rank is held by the House of Lords; its judges are not called judges, but Law Lords, and sit in the House of Lords as peers. Nomenclature The end of Judges.

  13. Lesson 6 – Twelve Angry Men (Part two) II. Court Working Dresses in England and Wales Judges hearing criminal cases High Court Judge Circuit Judge Judges hearing different cases wear different court dresses. Judges hearing civil cases District Judge Barristers or Advocates Court Clerk Court Usher To be continued on the next page.

  14. Lesson 6 – Twelve Angry Men (Part two) II. Court Working Dresses in England and Wales (red, black) gown, wig gown, no wig Judges hearing criminal cases: Working dress and possible options To be continued on the next page.

  15. Lesson 6 – Twelve Angry Men (Part two) II. Court Working Dresses in England and Wales Circuit judge 巡回法官 Circuit Judge: Working dress and possible options To be continued on the next page.

  16. Lesson 6 – Twelve Angry Men (Part two) II. Court Working Dresses in England and Wales In what way is this kind of dress different from that of a judge hearing criminal cases? Judges hearing civil cases: Working dress and possible options To be continued on the next page.

  17. Lesson 6 – Twelve Angry Men (Part two) II. Court Working Dresses in England and Wales barrister: 在英国有资格出席高等法庭并辩护的律师 advocate: 辩护律师 Barristers or Advocates: Working dress and possible options To be continued on the next page.

  18. Lesson 6 – Twelve Angry Men (Part two) II. Court Working Dresses in England and Wales Court Clerk: Working dress and possible options To be continued on the next page.

  19. Lesson 6 – Twelve Angry Men (Part two) II. Court Working Dresses in England and Wales Court usher: Working dress and possible options To be continued on the next page.

  20. Lesson 6 – Twelve Angry Men (Part two) II. Court Working Dresses in England and Wales Now it is proposed in Britain—as it is always proposed once every five years—that this anachronistic dress be abolished, and that judges and advocates, as in America, should appear in court as normal human beings. It is said that wigs and gowns intimidate the litigants and witnesses. Cons: what is your opinion? Yet some people argue that formal dress adds to the dignity of the court, is historic, distinguishes the main actors from mere participants. Pros: The end of Court Dresses in England and Wales.

  21. Lesson 6 – Twelve Angry Men (Part Two) Part Three Text Appreciation ENTER

  22. Lesson 6 – Twelve Angry Men (Part Two) Text Appreciation Contents • General Introduction • Writing devices: Pun • III. Sentence paraphrase

  23. Lesson 6 – Twelve Angry Men (Part Two) • General Introduction Plot: A young delinquent awaits sentencing for the manslaughter of his aggressive father. One juror feels there is a reasonable doubt—to the frustration of his eleven colleagues—thus preventing a quick verdict. During the heated deliberations, the hidden preconceptions and prejudices of the jurors are revealed. Plot elements: conflict, crisis/turning moment, climax, etc. Setting:jury room Protagonists : 12 jurors Theme of the story: "Twelve Angry Men" is about one individual's ability to stand up for what he believes, even when others ridicule him. It is also a powerful study not just of the criminal justice system, but also of the diversity of human experience, the nature of peer pressure, and the difficulty of ever fully knowing the truth. The end of General Introduction.

  24. pun Lesson 6 – Twelve Angry Men (Part Two) II. Writing Devices More examples Did you hear about the two molecules walking down the street?  One lost an electron, and exclaimed: "I've lost an electron!" The other said: "Are you sure?" And the first one said: "I'm positive!" A pun is defined by Webster as "the humorous use of a word, or of words which are formed or sounded alike but have different meanings, in such a way as to play on two or more of the possible applications; a play on words."   To be continued on the next page.

  25. Pun: more examples Lesson 6 – Twelve Angry Men (Part Two) II. Writing Devices Figure out which part of the sentence is a pun. • Seven days without food makes one weak. • Income Tax:  Capital punishment. • Why didn't the lions eat Daniel when he was • thrown in their den?  Because he read to • them from his Bible all night.  He was the • first prophet to read between the lions. To be continued on the next page.

  26. Pun: examples in the text Lesson 6 – Twelve Angry Men (Part Two) II. Writing Devices • No.4: Very annoying. (Para. 128) “Very annoying” here is used ironically as a pun: No.4 found the two deep impressions beside his nose annoying; and he thought No.9’s persistent interruption was annoying, too. The end of Writing Devices.

  27. Lesson 6 – Twelve Angry Men (Part Two) III. Sentence Paraphrase 1 But supposing he really did hear this phrase, how many time have all of you used it? (Para. 2) adverbial clause of condition, also used as “suppose” in spoken English Even if he did hear this phrase, we all have used it so many times but we don’t mean it. go to 2

  28. Lesson 6 – Twelve Angry Men (Part Two) III. Sentence Paraphrase 2 The kid yelled it out at the top of his lungs. (Para. 3) as loud as possible The boy cried out as loudly as he could. go to 3

  29. subjunctive mood passive gerund, used as the object of the phrase “afraid of” a rhetorical question Lesson 6 – Twelve Angry Men (Part Two) III. Sentence Paraphrase 3 Wouldn’t he be afraid of being caught? (Para. 9) More examples go to 4

  30. Lesson 6 – Twelve Angry Men (Part Two) III. Sentence Paraphrase 4 And from what was presented at the trial, the boy looks guilty on the surface. (Para. 9) a noun clause, object of the preposition “from” Apparently, it seems that the boy is guilty based on the evidence at the trial. go to 5

  31. Lesson 6 – Twelve Angry Men (Part Two) III. Sentence Paraphrase 5 … why did he leave it there in the first place? (Para. 13) … why did the boy leave the knife at the scene at the very beginning? go to 6

  32. We can suppose that the boy killed his father first, then ran out, overwhelmed with terror. Lesson 6 – Twelve Angry Men (Part Two) III. Sentence Paraphrase 6 • We can assume that the boy ran out in a state of • panic after having just killed his father. (Para.14) • More formal than “in panic”. Likewise, “in the course of history” is a more formal version of “in history”. • Gerund, used as the object of the preposition “after” go to 7

  33. Lesson 6 – Twelve Angry Men (Part Two) III. Sentence Paraphrase 7 Well, if I were the boy and had stabbed my father, I would take a chance and go back for the knife. (16) Subjunctive mood: No. 12 tried to put himself in the boy’s shoes and figure out what was really on his mind. go to 8

  34. Lesson 6 – Twelve Angry Men (Part Two) III. Sentence Paraphrase 8 I think there’s enough doubt that we can wonder if he was there at all during the time the killing took place. (Para.17) There is enough evidence so that we can doubt that the boy was there at the scene. go to 9

  35. Lesson 6 – Twelve Angry Men (Part Two) III. Sentence Paraphrase 9 I’ve seen all kinds of dishonesty in my day, but this little display takes the cake. (Para. 43) to be worse than anything else you can imagine I’ve seen all kinds of cheating, lying and other dirty tricks in my life, but this little demonstration is the worst I can imagine. go to 10

  36. Lesson 6 – Twelve Angry Men (Part Two) III. Sentence Paraphrase 10 I feel sorry for you. What it must feel like to want to pull the switch. You are a sadist! (Para. 48) subject infinitive, the real subject I can’t understand what kind of feeling it is that will make you want to pull the switch. The only possible answer is that you are a sadist. You enjoy inflicting pain. You enjoy watching people suffer. go to 11

  37. Lesson 6 – Twelve Angry Men (Part Two) III. Sentence Paraphrase 11 Don’t give me that! I’m sick and tired of facts. (Para. 55) be completely fed up with 少来这一套 Don’t give me that kind of argument. I don’t need it. go to 12

  38. Lesson 6 – Twelve Angry Men (Part Two) III. Sentence Paraphrase 12 He comes here running for his life. And now, before he can take a deep breath, he’s telling us how to run the show. The arrogance of this guy. (Para. 62) Present participle, used as the complement of the predicative. unfinished sentence be in charge, maneuver, control No. 11 is a new immigrant, or even a political refugee. He came to America to escape persecution, but now before he can take a deep breath, almost immediately, he is telling us Americans how to do everything. The arrogance of this guy is really something. go to 13

  39. Lesson 6 – Twelve Angry Men (Part Two) III. Sentence Paraphrase 13 An important point with the prosecution was the fact that after the boy claimed he had been at the movies during the hours in which the killing took place, he couldn’t remember the names… (Para. 64) appositive clause introduced by “that”, whose function is equal to the previous word “fact” go to 14

  40. Lesson 6 – Twelve Angry Men (Part Two) III. Sentence Paraphrase 14 I’m getting sick and tired of this yakking, yakking. So I guess I’ll have to break the tie. (Para. 99) end a relationship with a organization who voted for guilty These wordy, boring discussion is unbearable. Now I decided I’ll break away from my former union. go to 15

  41. Lesson 6 – Twelve Angry Men (Part Two) III. Sentence Paraphrase 15 Whenever you run into it, it always obscures the truth. (Para. 115) to start to experience a difficult or unpleasant situation When you run into prejudice, it will make it difficult to pursue the truth. go to 16

  42. Lesson 6 – Twelve Angry Men (Part Two) III. Sentence Paraphrase 16 Could these marks be made by anything other than eyeglasses? (Para. 137) except, apart from Is it possible that these marks could also be made by something else besides eyeglasses? The end of Sentence Paraphrase.

  43. Lesson 6 – Twelve Angry Men (Part Two) Part Four Language Study ENTER

  44. Lesson 6 – Twelve Angry Men (Part Two) Language Study Contents • Word Study • Phrases and Expressions

  45. Lesson 6 – Twelve Angry Men (Part Two) • Word Study Word list: • acquittal • avenge • bear • blunder • commonplace • injustice • intimidate • lunge • object • obscure • recreate • stamp • stick • testify • trot • underhand

  46. Lesson 6 – Twelve Angry Men (Part Two) • Word Study 1. acquittal n. an official statement in a court of law that someone is not guilty • Example: • Of 52 prosecutions for police brutality, 46 • ended in acquittals. • v. acquit somebody of something • The judge directed the jury to acquit Phillips • of the murder.

  47. Lesson 6 – Twelve Angry Men (Part Two) • Word Study 2. avenge • v. to do something to hurt or punish • someone because they have harmed or • offended you • Examples: • The Trojans wish to avenge the death of Hector; their misplaced values mean that patience in adversity is impossible. • Half a century later he has finally avenged that defeat.

  48. Lesson 6 – Twelve Angry Men (Part Two) • Word Study 3. bear bear sb. grudge bear sth. in mind bear a resemblance/relation to bear arms bear fruit v. a.to bravely accept or deal with a painful, difficult, or upsetting situation b.to dislike something or someone very much, often so that they make you feel annoyed or impatient To be continued on the next page.

  49. Lesson 6 – Twelve Angry Men (Part Two) • Word Study 4. blunder n. a careless or stupid mistake commit a blunder, make a blunder • Examples: • Major management blunders have led the company into bankruptcy. • The parents face a nightmare week-long wait before blood tests show if there has been a hospital blunder.

  50. Lesson 6 – Twelve Angry Men (Part Two) • Word Study 5. commonplace • a. happening or existing in many places, and therefore not special or unusual • Examples: • Car thefts are commonplace in this part of • town. • Expensive foreign cars are commonplace in • this Chicago suburb.