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Minority Influence

Minority Influence

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Minority Influence

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  1. Minority Influence

  2. Minority Influence • In the experiment by Asch, what reduced the level of conformity in some of the trials?

  3. Moscovici's study of minority influence • Aims: To investigate minority influence and try to support the view that a minority are most likely to influence a majority if they are consistent in their views.

  4. Moscovici's study of minority influence • Procedures: Participants were first given an eye test to check that they were not colour blind.

  5. Moscovici's study of minority influence • They were then placed in a group of four participants and two confederates. • They were all shown 36 slides that were different shades of blue and asked to state the colour out loud.

  6. Moscovici's study of minority influence • There were two groups in the experiment. • In the first group the confederates were consistent and answered green for every slide. • In the second group the confederates were inconsistent and answered green 24 times and blue 12 times.

  7. Moscovici's study of minority influence • Findings: • First the experiment was done with a control group where all the pressures to conform are removed. • Here only 0.25% of the answers were green.

  8. Moscovici's study of minority influence • In the experimental group where the confederates were inconsistent the percentage rose to 1.25% of green replies.

  9. Moscovici's study of minority influence • When the confederates were consistent with their replies the conformity rate rose to 8.42%

  10. Moscovici's study of minority influence

  11. Moscovici's study of minority influence • Conclusion: • That a minority has the power to influence a majority. • However, they are more influential when they are consistent in their views. • When they were inconsistent, they were largely ignored. • Later research confirmed this.

  12. Behavioural Style • Moscovici and Nemeth(1974) argued that persuasion is successful in the absence of status and power because of the 'behavioural style' of the minority group or person.

  13. Behavioural Style • A famous example of this is Freud who found himself as a very unpopular figure when he first brought out his theory of childhood sexuality, however Freud did not give in to the opposing majority view and carried on insisting his theory was correct, Freud was so good at influencing people that his theory was accepted and a lot of his terminology is now found in everyday language i.e. Freudian Slip

  14. Behavioural Style • The behavioural style of influential minorities has four main components • 1) Consistency • 2) Certainty in the correctness of the ideas or views they are putting forward • 3) Appearing to be objective and unbiased • 4) Resisting social pressure and abuse

  15. Superficial thought “What a load of crap. I can’t possibly agree with that.” Systematic thinking “Hmm.. This sounds interesting. I’ll think about this for a while before I make my mind up” Style of Thinking