chapter 7 n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Chapter 7 PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Chapter 7

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 162

Chapter 7 - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 468 Views
  • Uploaded on

Chapter 7 . Properties of Expectation. Outline. Introduction Expectation of Sums of R. V. Moments of the Number of Events that Occurs Covariance, Variance of Sum, and Correlations Conditional Expectation Conditional Expectation and Prediction Moment Generating Function

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

Chapter 7


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
    Presentation Transcript
    1. Chapter 7 Properties of Expectation

    2. Outline • Introduction • Expectation of Sums of R. V. • Moments of the Number of Events that Occurs • Covariance, Variance of Sum, and Correlations • Conditional Expectation • Conditional Expectation and Prediction • Moment Generating Function • Additional Properties of Normal R. V. • General Definition of Expectation

    3. Expected value of r. v. X 7.1 Introduction

    4. 7.2 Expectation of Sums of R. V.

    5. EXAMPLE 2a • An accident occurs at a point X that is uniformly distributed on a road of length L. At the time of the accident an ambulance is at a location Y that is also uniformly distributed on the road. Assuming that X and Y are independent, find the expected distance between the ambulance and the point of the accident.

    6. EXAMPLE 2b • Suppose that for random variables X and Y. X≧Y • That is, for any outcome of the probability experiment, the value of the random variable X is greater than or equal the value of the random variable Y. Since the preceding is equivalent to the inequality X -Y ≧ 0, it follows that E[X -Y]≧ 0, or, equivalently, E[X] ≧ E[Y] Using Equation (2.1), a simple induction proof shows that if E[Xi] is finite for all i = 1, …, n, then E[X1+X2+...+Xn]= E[X1]+...+E[Xn]

    7. Example 2c

    8. Example 2d

    9. EXAMPLE 2e • Expectation of a binomial random variable • Let X be a binomial random variable with parameters n and p. Recalling that such a random variable represents the number of successes in n independent trials when each trial has probability p of being a success, we have that

    10. EXAMPLE 2f • Mean of a negative binomial random variable • If independent trials, having a constant probability p of being successes, are per-formed, determine the expected number of trials required to amass a total of r successes.

    11. EXAMPLE 2g • Mean of a hypergeometric random variable • If n balls are randomly selected from an urn containing N balls of which m are white, find the expected number of white balls selected.

    12. EXAMPLE 2h • Expected number of matches • A group of N people throw their hats into the center of a room. The hats are mixed up, and each person randomly selects one. Find the expected number of people that select their own hat.

    13. EXAMPLE 2i • Coupon-collecting problems • Suppose that there are N different types of coupons and each time one obtains a coupon it is equally likely to be any one of the N types. Find the expected number of coupons one need amass before obtaining a complete set of at least one of each type.

    14. EXAMPLE 2j • Ten hunters are waiting for ducks to fly by. When a flock of ducks flies overhead, the hunters fire at the same time, but each chooses his target at random, independently of the others. If each hunter independently hits his target with probability p, compute the expected number of ducks that escape unhurt when a flock of size 10 flies overhead.

    15. EXAMPLE 2k Expected number of runs

    16. EXAMPLE 2L • A random walk in the plane • Consider a particle initially located at a given point in the plane and suppose that it undergoes a sequence of steps of fixed length but in a completely random direction. Specifically, suppose that the new position after each step is one unit of distance from the previous position and at an angle of orientation from the previous position that is uniformly distributed over (0, 2π) (see Figure 7.1). Compute the expected square of the distance from the origin after n steps.

    17. Analyzing the quick-sort algorithm

    18. Example 2n The probability of a union of events.

    19. Example 2O

    20. Example 2p

    21. 342~347

    22. 7.3 Moments of the Number of Events that Occurs

    23. 7.4 Covariance, Variance of Sum, and Correlations

    24. Variance of a binomial random variable Example 4b