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Locality and Self-Identity : The Inclusion of Local Literature in Indonesian English Text-Books. Ahmad Bukhori , Nia Nafisah , and Ika L. Damayanti Indonesia University of Education SoLLs.INTEC.09 Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia 5-6 May 2009 . Introduction .

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locality and self identity the inclusion of local literature in indonesian english text books

Locality and Self-Identity: The Inclusion of Local Literature in Indonesian English Text-Books

Ahmad Bukhori, NiaNafisah, and Ika L. Damayanti

Indonesia University of Education

SoLLs.INTEC.09

UniversitiKebangsaan Malaysia

5-6 May 2009

introduction
Introduction
  • English learning in Indonesia
    • English as a foreign language, now introduced earlier
    • Haliday’s (1985) Genre-Based Approach in Indonesian national curriculum of English; narrative text for junior and senior high schools
    • Wells’ (1987) four literacy levels (performative, functional (JHS), informational, and epistemic (SHS)
    • Children’s literature improve students’ interest (Lazar, 1993)
    • Relevance of learning material with students background knowledge (Gu, 2003; Blachowicz & Fisher, 2003; Elley, 1997)
    • Local stories support students’ learning of English (Muslim, 2008)
slide3

Globalization

    • Economic, social, political, psychological, and philosophical hegemony (Sasaki, 2004)
    • Stealing children’s innocence by corporate culture (Giroux, 2000)
    • Uprooted and lost generation (Mahfudin, 2009)
    • Awareness of self-identity (Giden 1991, in Barker, 2000)
introdu ction cont
IntroductionCont.
  • Identity
    • Who, what, and how to behave (Giden, 1991 in Barker, 2000)
    • Various ethnics in Indonesia. Majors:
      • Javanese, Sundanese (Java),
      • Padangese, Batakese (Sumatra),
      • Balinese,
      • Madurese,
      • Dayakese (Kalimantan)
      • Bugisi (Sulawesi)
      • Asmat (Papua)
    • Nurturance through formal schooling
      • Civic education for democracy and self-identity (Saifullah, 2009)
      • School dance from childhood games and plays (Sunaryo, 2009)
slide5

Questions:

    • How do Indonesian text-books incorporate local stories?
    • How do teachers and students perceive the inclusion of local stories in the text-book?
    • How does this inclusion influence students’ English learning process?
method
Method
  • Descriptive in nature
  • Sample :
    • 10 teachers of junior and senior high schools
    • Students 50 high school and 18 junior high
  • Instrument :
    • Questionnaire
      • Students (nationalism, reading interest, local/foreign stories in learning)
      • Teachers (nationalism, reading interests, local/foreign stories teaching process)
    • Interview
  • Location
    • Urban and suburban schools in Bandung West Java Indonesia
    • Public and religion schools
finding cont
Finding Cont.
  • Foreign and local stories in each English text-book
finding cont teachers
Finding Cont: Teachers
  • Nationalism
    • Very patriotic, proud of being Indonesians
      • Born, raised, work, and live in the country
      • Prefer local food and clothes, not always music
  • Reading interest
    • Many interested in reading local stories
    • A few interested in reading both stories (int’l schools)
  • English Teaching
    • Many found easier to teach narrative using local stories
    • A few found indifferent between both stories
finding cont students
Finding Cont: Students
  • Nationalism (food, film, fashion)
    • Majority, proud of being Indonesians, a few less proud
    • Like local food and fashion better due to availability and affordability
    • Many prefer foreign music due to creativity and English learning.
  • Reading interests
    • Junior high and religion school Ss like local stories better.
    • Senior high Ss of urban school prefer foreign stories to the local ones.
  • Learning process
    • Students of junior high and religion schools learn the four language skills better with local stories with slight difference for each skill
    • Some high school students learn the four language skills better with both foreign and local stories
discussion
Discussion
  • Inclusion of narrative texts:
    • As mandated by the curriculum, all sample books have included narrative texts in various forms, meeting the minimum requirement for a good text book set by the government.
    • Most students found it easier to learn the four English language skills using local stories (Lazar, 1993; Tomlinson, 1990; Wright, 1989), supported by (Muslim, 2008).
    • The content of text-book is rather relevant with students’ background or prior knowledge (Graves et.al., 2004; Gu, 2003; Blachowicz & Fisher, 2003; Elley, 1997).
    • Foreign stories are still dominant in English text-books.
    • Stories from Java are still central
      • Most book writers and publisher are in Java island
discussion cont
Discussion Cont.
  • Nurturing nationalism by teachers
    • Introducing local stories and cultures
  • School location determines students, interests and nationalism.
    • The less urban, the more nationalistic
  • Students’ intellectuality also influences their nationalism.
    • High achieving is more critical and less nationalistic.
  • Type of schools affect the sense of nationalism.
    • Religion school is more nationalistic, history approves
  • School levels influence the sense
    • JHS students are more nationalistic
    • Less exposed to foreign cultures
conclusion
Conclusion
  • Sample books have included narrative texts, but foreign story is still dominant.
  • Stories from Java island are still central.
  • Teachers tend to have higher sense of nationalism than their students (maturity and understanding of self-identity).
  • Ss from urban schools have less sense of nationalism due to their environment.
  • Some teachers find local stories support the teaching of narrative texts using local literature but others find it indifferent
  • Most students find it easier to learn the four skills of English via local stories but a few found indifferent.
  • The younger the students, the higher the nationalism .
suggestion
Suggestion
  • More quality local stories included in text-books.
  • Also, more non-Java stories included.
slide16

end …

Thank you

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