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MARITIME ENGLISH. 2009/10. Presentations. 5-7 minutes long PowerPoint slides are mandatory (main points and ! no complete sentences; spell check) Introduction, body, conclusion It must be based on an English text. One vocabulary question (and at least two more teacher questions).

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Presentation Transcript
presentations
Presentations
  • 5-7 minutes long
  • PowerPoint slides are mandatory (main points and ! no complete sentences; spell check)
  • Introduction, body, conclusion
  • It must be based on an English text.
  • One vocabulary question (and at least two more teacher questions).
introduction
Introduction
  • Your name and position
  • Title/subject of the presentation
  • Purpose of the presentation
  • Main parts or points of the presentation
  • Length of the time the presentation will take
  • When the audience may ask questions
sample introduction
Sample introduction

Good morning, ladies and gentlemen.

It’s a pleasure to be with you today.

My name’s Janez Novak I am a student at the Faculty of Maritime Studies and Transportation.

Today I would like to give a presentation on containerisation.

I have divided my presentation into three parts: first, the history of containerisation; second, the advantages of containerisation in comparison with traditional modes of transportation, and finally, container traffic in northern European ports.

If you have any questions, please feel free to interrupt me.

There will also be five minutes for questions at the end of my talk.

conclusion
Conclusion
  • Say that you are about to conclude
  • Summarize the main points of the presentation
  • Give your opinion
  • Thank the audience
  • Ask for questions
sample conclusion
Sample conclusion

Before we come to an end, let me just repeat that containerisation represented a revolution in the field of transportation.

To summarize, my presentation covered three main points: the history of containerisation, its advantages in comparison with traditional modes of transport, and container traffic in northern Adriatic ports.

In my opinion, feeder lines should be introduced to link the northern Adriatic ports and hinterland connections should be modernised as soon as possible.

I’d like to thank you for your listening.

Are there any questions?

assessment criteria 20 of the final grade
Assessment criteria – 20 % of the final grade

A. PREPARATION

  • Introduction
  • Conclusion
  • Use of linking phrases

B. PRESENTATION STYLE

  • Eye contact and body language
  • Visual aids

C. LANGUAGE

  • Grammar
  • Pronunciation
  • Speed of delivery
  • Questions from the audience
general cargo carrier
GENERAL CARGO CARRIER

The purpose she serves:

  • To carry packed cargo in boxes, crates or bags or coming in pieces

Feature(s) of design:

  • Derricks (ship’s)
  • Tweendecks
  • “open freighter”
dry bulk carrier
DRY BULK CARRIER

The purpose she serves:

  • To carry dry bulk cargo

Feature(s) of design:

  • Holds are divided into compartments (stability)
  • Self-trimming holds (rolling circumstances, list)
tanker
TANKER

The purpose she serves:

  • To carry liquid cargo

Feature(s) of design:

  • Double bottoms and hulls
  • Divided into compartments by bulkheads
  • Cofferdams (pump rooms)
container ship
CONTAINER SHIP

The purpose she serves:

  • To carry containerized cargo (general, liquid, refrigerated)

Feature(s) of design:

  • Cells
  • Gantry cranes
ro ro ship
RO/RO SHIP

The purpose she serves:

  • To carry wheeled cargo

Feature(s) of design:

  • No cargo handling equipment
  • Ramps
  • Bow and stern doors
coaster
COASTER

The purpose she serves:

  • To carry cargo along the coast or on sea voyages

Feature(s) of design:

  • Engine room is aft
  • No tweendecks
  • Broad hatches
  • Transverse strengthening
reefer
REEFER

The purpose she serves:

  • To carry perishable cargoes.

Feature(s) of design:

  • Temperature and humidity controls
  • Refrigerating plants
lash vessel
LASH-VESSEL

The purpose she serves:

  • To carry lighters

Feature(s) of design:

  • Flat main deck with no obstacles
  • Derricks or pumping system to load/discharge lighters
heavy load vessel
HEAVY LOAD VESSEL

The purpose she serves:

  • To lift and carry extremely heavy cargoes

Feature(s) of design:

  • Booms, masts and lifting blocks
  • Flat main deck
  • Powerful pumping system
timber carrier
TIMBER CARRIER

The purpose she serves:

  • To carry timber

Feature(s) of design:

  • Tall derricks
  • Timber load-line
multi load vessel
MULTI-LOAD VESSEL

The purpose she serves:

  • To carry general cargo, bulk cargo and containerized cargo

Feature(s) of design:

  • Variety of cargo handling gears
  • Subdivided into compartments
slide21
TUG

The purpose she serves:

  • To assist other vessels when entering or leaving the port, assist with a salvage operation

Feature(s) of design:

  • Powerful engines
  • CPP with adjustable blades
  • Bow and stern thrusters
  • Clear aft deck
salvage vessel
SALVAGE VESSEL

The purpose she serves:

  • To rescue other ships or their cargo from loss at sea

Feature(s) of design:

  • Heavy derricks (wrecks)
buoyage vessel
BUOYAGE VESSEL

The purpose she serves:

  • To place and maintain buoys

Feature(s) of design:

  • Flat aft deck
  • Hoisting installation
survey ship
SURVEY SHIP

The purpose she serves:

  • To perform marine research

Feature(s) of design:

  • Oceanographic instruments
supply vessel
SUPPLY VESSEL

The purpose she serves:

  • To supply oil rigs with stores and spare parts (towing of rigs, extinguishing fires)

Feature(s) of design:

  • High-capacity fire extinguishing pumps
sar vessel
SAR-VESSEL

The purpose she serves:

  • To perform search and rescue operations

Feature(s) of design:

  • Powerful engines
  • Communication instruments
firefloat
FIREFLOAT

The purpose she serves:

  • To fight against fire

Feature(s) of design:

  • Powerful fire-extinguishing system
pilot tender
PILOT TENDER

The purpose she serves:

  • To transport the pilot to the ship that requested pilotage

Feature(s) of design:

  • Sheltered aft deck
cable layer
CABLE LAYER

The purpose she serves:

  • To lay cables on the bottom of the sea

Feature(s) of design:

  • Huge horizontal wheel (reeling off cables)
  • Dynamic Positioning System
icebreaker
ICEBREAKER

The purpose she serves:

  • To ride up the ice and crush a way through for other ships

Feature(s) of design:

  • Powerful engine
  • Strengthening of her stem
dredger
DREDGER

The purpose she serves:

  • To deepen out harbours, ports, fairways, approaches and entrances

Feature(s) of design:

  • Integrated hopper
  • Spud system
  • Cutterhead
  • Bucket, grab or suction system
fisherman
FISHERMAN

The purpose she serves:

  • To catch and process fish

Feature(s) of design:

  • Refrigerating plants
  • deep-freezing facilities
  • RSW tanks
  • Powerful winches
types of vessels revision 79 2
Types of vessels – revision (79/2)
  • T
  • F (can be various commodities)
  • T
  • T
  • F (very large crude carrier)
  • F (liquefied)
  • F (rows – abeam, bays – fore to aft, tiers – layers)
  • F (wheeled)
  • F (ice breaker)
  • F (sinking, then it emerges again)
types of vessels revision 79 21
Types of vessels – revision (79/2)

11. T

12. T

13. F (in position)

14. F (fore, on the aft deck)

15. F (stems)

16. F (places and maintains)

17. T

18. F (marine research)

19. F (S&R operations)

20. F (weight)

types of vessels revision 76 3
Types of vessels – revision (76/3)

A – 19

B – 13

C – 10

D – 17

E – 23

F – 15

G – 21

H – 1

I – 2

J – 12

K – 3

L – 5

types of vessels revision 76 31
Types of vessels – revision (76/3)

M – 14

N – 16

O – 20

P – 7

Q – 18

R – 22

S – 6

T – 4

U – 11

V – 9

W – 8

general arrangement plan 85 2
General arrangement plan (85/2)
  • Main deck – weather or upper deck (glavni krov)
  • Forecastle (deck) – foremost part of the upper deck (stan)
  • Tweendeck – intermediate deck between the main deck and the tanktop. It divides the vessel into holds (medkrovje)
  • Lower deck (tanktop) – top side of the tanks section or double bottom (spodnji krov)
  • Upper/lower hold – spaces for cargo (zgornje/spodnje skladišče)
  • Forepeak/afterpeak tanks (FPT and APT) – foremost (e.g. ballasting) and aftmost (e.g. Steering gear compartment) spaces (premčni in krmni pretežni tank/pik)
general arrangement plan 85 21
General arrangement plan (85/2)
  • Chain locker – storage of the anchor chain (verižnica)
  • Boatswain’s locker – for ropes, paint, dunnage (shramba vodje krova)
  • Collision bulkheads – are forepeak (FPB) and afterpeak (APB) bulkheads, they prevent flooding and are fire-retarding (fireproof), (premčna in krmna prestrežna pregrada)
  • Engine room – watertight machinery space (strojnica)
  • Steering engine room – watertight compartment (strojnica krmilne naprave)
  • Double bottom – for strength, provides storage (dvojno dno)
  • Cofferdam – transverse or longitudinal spaces that prevent leakage (vmesni prostor)
  • Superstructure – accommodation for crew and passengers, messroom (jedilnica), galley (kuhinja) and pantries (shramba).
general arrangement plan p 82 the upper deck
General arrangement plan(p. 82 – The upper deck)

Which English words found on p. 82 correspond to these Slovene terms?

desna krmna stran

desna premčna stran

desna stran

krmni krov

leva krmna stran

leva premčna stran

leva stran

naprej

nazaj

pravokotno na bok

sredina ladje

središčnica

stan

general arrangement plan p 82 the upper deck keys
General arrangement plan(p. 82 – The upper deck) – keys
  • Fore-and-aft line – središčnica
  • Starboard side – desna stran
  • Portside – leva stran
  • Abeam – pravokotno na bok
  • Ahead – naprej
  • Astern – nazaj
  • Foremost deck – stan
  • Midships – sredina ladje
  • Quarterdeck – krmni krov
  • Starboard bow – desna premčna stran
  • Port bow – leva premčna stran
  • Starboard quarter – desna krmna stran
  • Port quarter – leva krmna stran
additional vocabulary exercise pp 83 84
Additional vocabulary exercise, pp. 83-84
  • chartroom
  • stem
  • wheelhouse
  • wing tank
  • collision
  • extreme fore end
  • freighters
  • hatches
  • longitudinal and transverse
  • lubricating oil
  • potable water
  • propulsion plant
general arrangement plan revision p 87
General arrangement plan- revision – p. 87
  • F (port, starboard)
  • T
  • F (lower deck)
  • F (bow : quarter)
  • F (FPB : APB)
  • T
  • F (chain : chain locker)
  • T
  • F (chain only)
  • T
  • F (spaces not bulkheads)
  • F (1: 2)
types of vessels revision page 1
Types of vessels – revision (page 1)
  • Liner (not tramp)
  • not cargo coming in bulk
  • Not edible oils
  • Submerging (not emerging)
  • Fore to aft (not port to starboard)
  • Cargo vessels (not passenger vessels)
  • Derricks (not cranes)
  • Stems (not sterns)
  • Embark (not disembark)
  • Fire-fighting (not fire-retarding)
  • Volume (not displacement)
general arrangement plan revision page 1
General arrangement plan – revision (page 1)
  • Centre line (not upper deck)
  • Stern (not bow)
  • Holds (not hatches)
  • Not for cargo
  • Longitudinal (not transverse)
matching p 91 2
Matching – p. 91/2
  • GRT (4)
  • Cargo carrying capacity (7)
  • Net tonnage (5)
  • Bale space (8)
  • Grain space (9)
  • Deadweight (6)
  • Upthrust (2)
  • Loaded draft (12)
  • Ullage space (11)
  • Oil space (10)
  • Buoyancy (3)
  • Moulded depth (14)
  • Moulded breadth (13)
matching p 91 21
Matching – p. 91/2
  • Beam (15)
  • Freeboard (20)
  • LPP (25)
  • Draft (16)
  • LOA (22)
  • Aft perpendicular (24)
  • Salt-water draft (18)
  • UKC (21)
  • Air draft (19)
  • Fore perpendicular (23)
  • Summer freeboard (17)
  • Displacement (1)
ship measurement p 93 3
Ship measurement – p. 93/3
  • displaces
  • upthrust / weight
  • buoyancy / gravity
  • weight / weight / displaced
  • enclosed
  • deducting / gross
  • dues
  • contents (cargo, bunkers, equipment, stores)
  • LOA
  • LPP
  • summer loadline (CWL)
ship measurement p 93 31
Ship measurement – p. 93/3
  • intersection / stem
  • moulded breadth
  • moulded depth
  • breadth
  • draft
  • air draft
  • freeboard
  • UKC
ship measurement p 95 2
Ship measurement – p. 95/2
  • mass (not volume)
  • T
  • equal to (not greater than)
  • contents and vessel (not only contents)
  • T
  • that are NOT used for cargo
  • T
  • of the vessel only (and not also her contents)
  • T
  • T
ship measurement p 95 21
Ship measurement – p. 95/2
  • in summertime (not in different seasons)
  • stem (not stern)
  • goes through the rudderstock (no intersection)
  • moulds (not vessel)
  • T
  • UKC (not draft)
  • waterline (not seabed)
  • deckline (not seabed)
  • seabed (not surface of the water)
stability pp 114 115 exercise 7
Stability – pp. 114-115/exercise 7
  • A state of equilibrium
  • Because also too much stability is undesired
  • Balance (buoyancy and gravity must be equal)
  • If a body, subject to a small disturbance from a state of equilibrium tends to return to that state
  • If, following the disturbance, the equilibrium is reduced even more
  • When a body is immersed in a liquid, it will experience an upthrust that is equal to the weight of the displaced liquid
  • External influences (wind, waves, water properties: density, kinematic viscosity, salinity) and internal influences or the human factor (HF), which include the action of the rudder when the ship is maneuvered and loading and discharging cargoes.
  • Draft and trim.
  • Salinity and temperature.
  • Higher viscosity results in higher frictional resistance.
  • “The action of the rudder when a ship is maneuvering” is an example of HF.
shipbuilding classification p 98 pp 108 109
Shipbuilding – classification (p. 98, pp. 108-109)

Pre-construction stage

  • The Society has made up ... C
  • The Society approves ... J
  • The Society ensures that ... I

During construction

  • The Society checks the maintenance of ... G
  • The Society assures that the ship will meet ... D
slide54
Upon and after completion of construction
  • The Society awards “+100 A1” to indicate that ... B
  • The Society awards “+” to indicate that ... F
  • The Society awards “100A” to indicate that ... L
  • The Society awards “1” to indicate that ... H
  • The Society’s surveyors ... A
  • The Society ensures that ... K
  • The Society is empowered to ... E
shipbuilding building the ship pp 98 99 p 110
Shipbuilding – Building the ship (pp. 98-99, p. 110)
  • Beam - strengthening (A), support (E)
  • Bracket – support (E); propeller bracket
  • Brace – support (E)
  • Bulkhead – separation (D)
  • Deck – shaping (B), plating (B)
  • Floor – shaping (B)
  • Frame – shaping (B)
  • Girder – strengthening (A), support (E); bottom girder, deck girder
  • Keelson – strengthening (A); = centre girder
  • Shell – plating (C); shell plating
  • Stanchion – strengthening (A), support (E)
  • Stiffener – strengthening (A)
  • Strake – plating (C)
  • Stringer – strengthening (A)
shipbuilding propellers p 100 p 111
Shipbuilding – Propellers (p. 100, p. 111)

Controllable Pitch Propeller (CPP)

(propeler s premičnimi krili)

Pitch = korak = the distance that the propeller will travel after one revolution.

Application:

- In vessels with variable rated capacities.

Advantage(s):

  • The thrust can be varied while maintaining constant shaft revolutions.
  • Astern thrust can be produced while rotating in the same direction.
  • Vessel maneuverability is increased.
  • Engine wear is reduced (constant RPM can be maintained).

Disadvantage(s):

  • Limited power that can be transmitted.
  • Complicated mechanism controlling the blade angle.
  • Enlarged boss.
shipbuilding propellers p 100 p 1111
Shipbuilding – Propellers (p. 100, p. 111)

Voith Schneider Propeller or Vertical Axis Propeller

(Voith Schneiderjev propeler)

Application:

- Vessels that need to be highly maneuverable (tugs, ferries).

Advantage(s):

  • Thrust can be produced in any desired direction.
  • High maneuverability.

Disadvantage(s):

- Necessity of a bevel gear (consequent impact on maximum power).

shipbuilding propellers p 100 p 1112
Shipbuilding – Propellers (p. 100, p. 111)

Ducted or Shrouded Propeller

(propeler v šobi)

Application:

  • e.g., tugs (small ships with high rated capacities).

Advantage(s):

  • Maneuverability.
  • The duct protects the propeller from fouling.
  • The duct reduces propeller noise.

Disadvantage(s):

- It is costly.

shipbuilding rudders p 101 p 112
Shipbuilding – Rudders (p. 101, p. 112)

Balanced rudder

(balansno krmilo)

Application:

  • Vessels with a long sharp stem.

Advantage(s) and/or disadvantage(s):

  • It offers good maneuverability.
  • Not much strength is applied to the rudderstock.
  • The steering gear is quite compact.
shipbuilding rudders p 101 p 1121
Shipbuilding – Rudders (p. 101, p. 112)

Semi-balanced rudder or Gnomon rudder

(polbalansno krmilo)

Application:

- Where the size of the rudder requires support from an additional point to the rudder bearing.

Advantage(s) and/or disadvantage(s):

  • Reduces the size of the steering gear.
  • High maneuverability.
shipbuilding rudders p 101 p 1122
Shipbuilding – Rudders (p. 101, p. 112)

Unbalanced rudder

Application:

  • In vessels whose stern shape is not fit to carry a balanced rudder.
  • On smaller ships with relatively deep draft.

Advantage(s) and/or disadvantage(s):

- The rudderstock must be able to endure large stresses.

shipbuilding rudders p 101 p 1123
Shipbuilding – Rudders (p. 101, p. 112)

Flap rudder

Application:

  • Used in vessels that require considerable maneuverability.

Advantage(s) and/or disadvantage(s):

  • The flap can move at a greater angle than the main portion of the rudder.
  • The complicated linkage system is vulnerable is subject to frequent malfunctions.
shipbuilding manoeuvrability pp 101 102 p 113
Shipbuilding – Manoeuvrability (pp. 101-102, p. 113)

A – maximum transfer

B – steady turning radius

C – tactical diameter

D – pivoting point

E – approach

F – drift angle

G – advance

H – path of the centre of gravity

I – centre point

maritime communication
Maritime Communication

See video at (Marine Communication System):

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8dCfJZ9r2-E&feature=PlayList&p=3BE1B89C618A74DC&playnext=1&playnext_from=PL&index=7

How can you summarize it?

maritime communication pp 47 48 1 18
Maritime Communication, pp. 47-48 (1-18)
  • Communication between ships.
  • Internal communication on the ship.
  • The category of the message (distress alert, urgency, safety, routine)
  • DISTRESS ALERT: When there is serious and immediate danger for the vessel, crew and passengers.
  • URGENCY: When there is serious danger for the vessel, crew and passengers.
  • SAFETY: When there is imminent risk for navigation.
  • ROUTINE: is transmitted to ensure safe navigation.
  • Is a part of SOLAS. Main objective: to prevent accidents by providing MSI and minimize consequences of marine accidents by means of effective communication.
maritime communication pp 47 48 1 181
Maritime Communication, pp. 47-48 (1-18)
  • GMDSS communication equipment:
  • Sea Area A1: short-range radio services (VHF) – radiotelephony, DSC.
  • Sea Area A2: medium-range services (MF) – radiotelephony, DSC (+ equipment for Sea Area A1).
  • Sea Area A3: Inmarsat A, B or C ship/earth station or DSC-equipped HF (high frequency) radiotelephone/telex (+ equipment for Sea Areas A1 and A2).
  • Sea Area A4 (polar regions): DSC-equipped HF radiotelephone/telex (+ equipment for Sea Areas A1 and A2). No Inmarsat but COSPAS-SARSAT coverage.
maritime communication pp 47 48 1 182
Maritime Communication, pp. 47-48 (1-18)

http://www.gmdss.com.au/concepts.htm

maritime communication pp 47 48 1 183
Maritime Communication, pp. 47-48 (1-18)

http://www.gmdss.com.au/concepts.htm

maritime communication pp 47 48 1 184
Maritime Communication, pp. 47-48 (1-18)
  • Those that do not need to be fitted with GMDSS equipment (small vessels, not self-propelled vessels, men-of-war).
  • Terrestrial GMDSS system: RTF (radiotelephony), DSC (Digital Selective Calling), DPT (Direct Printing Telegraphy), NAVTEX (Navigational Telex), SART (Search and Rescue Radar Transponder). See video at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pAW3cgdgjMg
  • Sattelite GMDSS system: Inmarsat, COSPAS/SARSAT, EPIRB (Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacons), STAREC (Status-recording System).
  • Simplex: speaking and listening cannot be done at the same time (“over”); Duplex: speaking and listening can be done at the same time.
maritime communication pp 47 48 1 185
Maritime Communication, pp. 47-48 (1-18)
  • D
  • Wrong – GMDSS vessel.
  • Inmarsat satellites are geostationary (communication extends between 70o N and 70o S); COSPAS-SARSAT are not geostationary, they pass closely over both poles – the only means to contact distant stations.
maritime communication pp 47 48 1 186
Maritime Communication, pp. 47-48 (1-18)

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/e/e0/Couverture_satellite_inmarsat.svg/651px-Couverture_satellite_inmarsat.svg.png

maritime communication pp 47 48 1 187
Maritime Communication, pp. 47-48 (1-18)

http://www.marinebuzz.com/marinebuzzuploads/SeafarersWatchout_FED/COSPAS_SARSAT_overview.jpg

maritime communication pp 47 48 1 188
Maritime Communication, pp. 47-48 (1-18)
  • NAVTEX (telex-receiver that prints MSI-messages) message: information concerning meteorological warnings, SAR-operations, other important and urgent data. See MSI message below (http://www.frisnit.com/cgi-bin/navtex/view.cgi)

ZCZC JA03291357 UTC MAR POLISH NAV WARN 8 SOUTHERN BALTIC FROM 29 OF MAR 1220 UTC TOWING OPERATION OF THE DRILING PLATFORM PETROBALTIC BY SHIPS GRANIT AND TYTAN. FROM PSN 5533.50N 01-12.19E TO PN 56-02.50N 01744.80E. WIDE BEARTH REQUESTED. NNNN

maritime communication pp 47 48 1 189
Maritime Communication, pp. 47-48 (1-18)

http://www.icselectronics.co.uk/icsnet/GMDSS/navmessage.htm

maritime communication pp 47 48 1 1810
Maritime Communication, pp. 47-48 (1-18)
  • EPIRB – releases distress signals, which are received by satellites and relayed to RCCs (identification and position of the vessel in distress). It is released by hand or automatically and activated automatically.

see video (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=evhq_38mkPY)

SART – is activated by the radar of a passing vessel. Then it starts to transmit an alert (a series of [12] dots on the Plan Position Indicator – radar display of the same vessel).

maritime communication pp 47 48 1 1811
Maritime Communication, pp. 47-48 (1-18)

http://www.sartech.com/images/sartsfaq_pic2.jpg

maritime communication pp 47 48 1 1812
Maritime Communication, pp. 47-48 (1-18)
  • Terrestrial GMDSS system: RTF (radiotelephony), DSC (Digital Selective Calling), DPT (Direct Printing Telegraphy), NAVTEX (Navigational Telex), SART (Search and Rescue Radar Transponder).
  • Sattelite GMDSS system: Inmarsat, COSPAS/SARSAT, EPIRB (Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacons), STAREC (Status-recording System).
  • Simplex: speaking and listening cannot be done at the same time (“over”); Duplex: speaking and listening can be done at the same time.
maritime communication pp 47 48 1 1813
Maritime Communication, pp. 47-48 (1-18)
  • D
  • Wrong – GMDSS vessel.
  • Inmarsat satellites are geostationary (communication extends between 70o N and 70o S); COSPAS-SARSAT are not geostationary, they pass closely over both poles – the only means to contact distant stations.
maritime communication pp 47 48 1 1814
Maritime Communication, pp. 47-48 (1-18)

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/e/e0/Couverture_satellite_inmarsat.svg/651px-Couverture_satellite_inmarsat.svg.png

maritime communication pp 47 48 1 1815
Maritime Communication, pp. 47-48 (1-18)

http://www.marinebuzz.com/marinebuzzuploads/SeafarersWatchout_FED/COSPAS_SARSAT_overview.jpg

maritime communication pp 47 48 1 1816
Maritime Communication, pp. 47-48 (1-18)
  • NAVTEX (telex-receiver that prints MSI-messages) message: information concerning meteorological warnings, SAR-operations, other important and urgent data. See MSI message below (http://www.frisnit.com/cgi-bin/navtex/view.cgi)

ZCZC JA03291357 UTC MAR POLISH NAV WARN 8 SOUTHERN BALTIC FROM 29 OF MAR 1220 UTC TOWING OPERATION OF THE DRILING PLATFORM PETROBALTIC BY SHIPS GRANIT AND TYTAN. FROM PSN 5533.50N 01-12.19E TO PN 56-02.50N 01744.80E. WIDE BEARTH REQUESTED. NNNN

maritime communication pp 47 48 1 1817
Maritime Communication, pp. 47-48 (1-18)

http://www.icselectronics.co.uk/icsnet/GMDSS/navmessage.htm

maritime communication pp 47 48 1 1818
Maritime Communication, pp. 47-48 (1-18)
  • EPIRB – releases distress signals, which are received by satellites and relayed to RCCs (identification and position of the vessel in distress). It is released by hand or automatically and activated automatically.

see video (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=evhq_38mkPY)

SART – is activated by the radar of a passing vessel. Then it starts to transmit an alert (a series of [12] dots on the Plan Position Indicator – radar display of the same vessel).

maritime communication pp 47 48 1 1819
Maritime Communication, pp. 47-48 (1-18)

http://www.sartech.com/images/sartsfaq_pic2.jpg

maritime communication1
MARITIME COMMUNICATION
  • What is maritime communication
  • Priorities
  • GMDSS
  • Communication systems:
      • Terrestrial systems
      • Satellite systems
what is maritime communication
WHAT IS MARITIME COMMUNICATION

MC includes communication between:

  • vessels and coast stations,
  • intership communication and
  • intraship communication.

Communication can be done via:

  • RTF,
  • satellite,
  • DSC, and
  • radio-telex.
priorit i es
PRIORITIES

Priorities = categories of messages that indicate the importance of the message.

  • Distress alert (MAYDAY) – serious and immediate danger for vessel, crew and passengers.
  • Urgency message (PAN PAN) – serious danger for vessel, crew and passengers.
  • Safety message (SECURITE) – imminent risk for navigation.
  • Routine message – ensures safe navigation.
gmdss
GMDSS

= Global Maritime Distress and Safety System

Main objective: prevent accidents (MSI) or minikmize consequences of marine accidents by means of efficient communication.

GMDSS vessels:

... all vessels on international voyages except:

  • very small vessels (not engaged in trade),
  • ships that are not self-propelled,
  • men-of-war.
terrestrial s y stem s
TERRESTRIAL SYSTEMS

GMDSS terrestrial systems:

  • RTF (radio telephony),
  • DSC (digital selective calling),
  • DPT (direct printing telegraphy),
  • NAVTEX (navigational telex) and
  • SART (search and rescue radar transponder).
satelite system s
SATELITE SYSTEMS

GMDSS satellite systems:

  • Inmarsat
  • COSPAS
  • SARSAT
satel l ite system s inmarsat
SATELLITE SYSTEMS – Inmarsat
  • International Mobile Satellite Organisation
  • Geostationary
  • 70o latitude North and 70o latitude South
  • 4 Inmarsat regions (see picture):
    • Atlantic Ocean Region West
    • Atlantic Ocean Region East
    • Indian Ocean Region
    • Pacific Ocean Region
satelite system s cospas sarsat
SATELITE SYSTEMS – COSPAS/SARSAT
  • satellite-based search and rescue system (Canada, US, France, Russia)
  • Not geostationary
  • Distanst stations
  • Uses EPIRB
vhf communication distress urgency safety
VHF communication – distress, urgency, safety

Watch the CD-rom presentation.

What will today’s class be about?

spelling p 27
SPELLING, p. 27

When spelling is used, only the accepted spelling tables can be used.

Check the table on p. 27 and find associations for each of the letters.

spelling 1 2
SPELLING 1/2

A – ALFA (Alfa Romeo)

B – BRAVO (Fiat Bravo)

C – CHARLIE (Charlie Chaplin)

D – DELTA (Lancia Delta)

E – ECHO (Ecosystem)

F – FOXTROT (dance)

G – GOLF (Volkswagen Golf)

H – HOTEL (California)

I – INDIA (hashish)

J – JULIET (Romeo)

K – KILO (cocaine)

L – LIMA (Adriana)

M – MIKE (Tyson)

spelling 2 2
SPELLING 2/2

N – NOVEMBER (Rain)

O – OSCAR (Wild)

P – PAPA (Chico)

Q – QUEBEC (Canada)

R – ROMEO (Juliet)

S – SIERRA (Nevada)

T – TANGO (and Cash)

U – UNIFORM (military)

V – VICTOR (Morales)

W – WHISKY (in a Jar)

X – X-RAY (ecstasy)

Y – YANKEE (New York)

Z – ZULU (vudu)

maritime communication pp 48 49
MARITIME COMMUNICATION, pp. 48-49
  • Following the Address & Identify procedure (message by voice).
  • By means of DSC (then the actual message is transmitted).

Study sample messages (non-GMDSS and GMDSS) on pp. 13-16 and 19.

  • What is the priority in each of them?
  • What is the position of the vessel in each of them?
  • What is the nature of distress or disaster in each of them?
  • What is the assistance required in each of them?
  • What is any other useful information in each of them?

Use the information to fill in the table on the following slide.

role plays p 50
Role plays, p. 50

Study cases 1-6. Write down the transmitted messages following the samples on pp. 13-15.

role plays p 501
Role plays, p. 50

Case 1 (GMDSS)

MAYDAY MAYDAY MAYDAY

This is too wun wun – six ait seven zeero zeero zeero

Pearl Head – Victor Romeo Sierra Echo.

My position tree seven degrees wun fife minutes north / zeero wun six

degrees wun zeero minutes west

I am on fire. Fire is in engine room and bridge. Vessel is sinking.

Crew must abandon vessel.

Number of crew on board: wun fife.

Number of injured persons: six.

Number of casualties: one.

Number of lifeboats launched: two. SMCP?

role plays p 502
Role plays, p. 50

Case 2 (non-GMDSS)

MAYDAY MAYDAY MAYDAY

This is Stella Maris, Stella Maris, Stella Maris.

My position fower fower degrees fife ait minutes north /

zero wun tree degrees fife minutes west

I had a collision with a container.

Water is entering the vessel. Vessel is sinking.

Number of crew on board: too.

SMCP?

role plays p 503
Role plays, p. 50

Case 3 (GMDSS)

PAN PAN PAN PAN PAN PAN

ALL STATIONS ALL STATIONS ALL STATIONS

This is too wun wun – ait six ait – zeero zeero zeero

Christina – Papa Kilo Alfa Hotel

My position fife six degrees too niner minutes north / zeero wun wun degrees fife tree minutes east

The vessel is damaged below waterline.

I need tug assistance.

SMCP?

role plays p 504
Role plays, p. 50

Case 4 (non-GMDSS)

PAN PAN PAN PAN PAN PAN

ALL STATIONS ALL STATIONS ALL STATIONS

This is Vicente – Papa Whiskey Charlie Alfa

Vicente – Papa Whiskey Charlie Alfa

Vicente – Papa Whiskey Charlie Alfa

My position tree six degrees too wun minutes north / zeero zeero niner degrees fife tree minutes west.

A seriously wounded man is on board.

I need medical assistance.SMCP?

role plays p 505
Role plays, p. 50

Case 5 (GMDSS)

SECURITE SECURITE SECURITE

ALL STATIONS ALL STATIONS ALL STATIONS

This is fower too six – fower seven seven – zeero zeero zeero.

Vermont – Uniform Bravo Charlie Echo.

My position bearing too fife niner degrees from Falls Light, distance wun decimal fife miles.

Time: May twelve – wun six fower fife. UTC.

Buoy Foxtrot Lima wun in position too fife niner degrees from Falls Light, distance too miles, is off station.

SMCP?

role plays p 506
Role plays, p. 50

Case 6 (non-GMDSS)

SECURITE SECURITE SECURITE

ALL STATIONS ALL STATIONS ALL STATIONS

This is Vicente – Papa Whiskey Charlie Alfa

Vicente – Papa Whiskey Charlie Alfa

Vicente – Papa Whiskey Charlie Alfa

My position bearing wun ait fife degrees from Estoril Lighthouse, distance tree decimal fife miles

Time: May twenty-eight – zero zero zero zero hours. UTC.

Buoy Echo Lima tree in position wun ait fife degrees from Estoril Lighthouse, distance too decimal tree miles, is unlit.SMCP?

smcp introduction
SMCP – Introduction

Quickly skim the SMCP found on pp. 28-44 (we’ll get back to SMCP in the following weeks).

For all SMCP check this link: http://home.kpn.nl/kluij016/smcp.htm

Identify the SMCP that could replace the sentences used in the distress, urgency and safety messages written earlier.

smcp introduction1
SMCP – Introduction

p. 28 – yes

p. 29/1 – no

p. 29/2 – yes (I require medical assistance)

p. 30 – yes

p. 31 – yes

p. 32 – no

p. 33 – yes

p. 34 – no

p. 35 – no

p. 36 – no

p. 37 – no

p. 38 – no

p. 39 – no

p. 40 – no

p. 41 – no

p. 42 – no

p. 43 – no

p. 44 – no

smcp introduction2
SMCP – Introduction

Examples:

I am on fire in posn. ... (p. 28)

Fire is in engine room. (p. 28)

Number of injured persons: 6 (p.28)

I am flooding below waterline. (p. 28)

Crew must abandon vessel. (p. 28)

I have collided with ... (p. 28)

I require medical assistance. (p. 29)

Warning: Buoy Kilo Lima - two in posn. ... off station. (p. 33)

Warning: Buoy Charlie Alfa – four in posn. ... unlit. (p. 33)

video
Video

See the video at:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-QfiNSBkGnc

For each of the vessels, identify:

  • whether the vessel was a GMDSS or non-GMDSS vessel,
  • the priority (distress, urgency, safety),
  • problem,
  • assistance required.

Give general comments on the communication presented in the video.

What have you learnt from today’s class?

maritime communication p 49
MARITIME COMMUNICATION, p. 49

Read pp. 17-18, listen to the text on slides, and answer questions 21-25 on pp. 49.

  • (slide 14) RECEIVED MAYDAY – Any ship receiving a distress alert acknowledgement from a coastal station must transmit a “Received Mayday” to the distressed vessel.
  • (slide 15) RECEIVED MAYDAY (supplementary) – A vessel within a short range of the distressed vessel if she is “able to comply”.
  • (slide 16) MAYDAY RELAY – If a vessel has noticed that a vessel in distress is not able to transmit a Distress Alert, she must transmit a Distress Alert Relay.
  • (slide 24) SILENCE MAYDAY – When a SAR operation is in progress (by the RCC or OSC).
  • (slide 29) SILENCE FINI – After the SAR operation has been completed.
search and rescue pp 48 49
SEARCH AND RESCUE, pp. 48-49

Read the text on p. 20 and answer questions 26-27 on pp. 49.

  • SMC – SAR Mission Coordinator (at the RCC) – guides the operation until rescue has been effected or it has become apparent that further activities are hopeless.
  • OSC (On the Scene Coordinator) – coordinate on-scene activities, ensure communications until a SAR vessel is available.

Read the short-form SITREP (p. 20) and listen to the text on slides 25-28.

  • What is a (short-form) SITREP?
  • Who is it transmitted by?
  • What is its purpose?
slide116
Read the full-form SITREP (p. 21).
  • What is a full-form SITREP?
  • Who is it transmitted by?
  • What is its purpose?
  • Which additional information might be included?
smcp pp 25 44
SMCP, pp. 25-44

Read the text on pp. 25-27, listen to the text on slides and answer questions 28-30 on p. 49.

  • SMCP – they are short, precise, unambiguous and simple.
  • “Repeat” – when the message is repeated (I say again);

“Say again” – when the message is not clearly heard.

  • “Stand by!” – instruction to wait for further information.
routine messages pp 22 23
ROUTINE MESSAGES, pp. 22-23

Read the text on pp. 22 and listen to slides 31, 32, and 33.

Check signal strengths on p. 25.

Urgent routine message on VHF

  • Study the urgent routine message on p. 23 and listen to the text on slide 34.
  • Study the message after DSC announcement on p. 23.
      • What do the words “Information”, “Warning”, “Advice” and “Repeat” in the message refer to?
  • Have a look at p. 54 and, based on these examples, write down dialogues for cases 1, 5, 6 (!! Include relevant SMCP !!)
intership routine communication p 54
INTERSHIP ROUTINE COMMUNICATION, p. 54

CASE 1

Anti Costi V8SH Anti Costi V8SH Anti Costi V8SH

This is Seaborne VRSH

Seaborne VRSH

Seaborne VRSH

Warning: You are running into danger! Shallow waters to the North of you.

Advice you alter course to port.

Repeat: Advice you alter course to port.

OVER

intership routine communication p 541
INTERSHIP ROUTINE COMMUNICATION, p. 54

CASE 2

Arctic Explorer Arctic Explorer Arctic Explorer

This is Ocean Queen

Ocean Queen

Ocean Queen

Warning: You are running into danger! Submerged wreck on your course.

Advice you alter course to wun ait zeero degrees.

Repeat: Advice you alter course to wun ait zeero degrees.

OVER

intership routine communication p 542
INTERSHIP ROUTINE COMMUNICATION, p. 54

CASE 3

Mineshead Mineshead Mineshead

This is Castor PHSA

Castor PHSA

Castor PHSA

Warning: You are running into danger! Fog bank ahead of you.

Repeat: Fog bank ahead of you.

OVER

intership routine communication p 543
INTERSHIP ROUTINE COMMUNICATION, p. 54

CASE 4

Levanta Levanta Levanta

This is Catinca RRSA

Catinca RRSA

Catinca RRSA

Warning: You are running into danger! Risk of collision with vessel on starboard.

Advice you alter course to port.

Advice you reduce your speed.

OVER

intership routine communication p 544
INTERSHIP ROUTINE COMMUNICATION, p. 54

CASE 5

All vessels All vessels All vessels

Calling unknown vessel in position bearing too niner zeero degrees from Cape Griz Nes, distance too decimal fife miles

This is Chaser DEKL

Chaser DEKL

Chaser DEKL

Intention: I will overtake on your port side. My course is wun fife too degrees. Speed niner knots.

OVER ...

intership routine communication p 545
INTERSHIP ROUTINE COMMUNICATION, p. 54

CASE 5

Chaser DEKL

This is Packer P3XQ

Message understood

OUT

intership routine communication p 546
INTERSHIP ROUTINE COMMUNICATION, p. 54

CASE 6

All vessels All vessels All vessels

Calling unknown vessel in position bearing too miles north of the breakwater with black hull and yellow superstructure.

This is Dian Chi OSXT.

Dian Chi OSXT.

Dian Chi OSXT.

Information: I am at anchor in the middle of the fairway.

Question: What are your intentions?

OVER

intership routine communication p 547
INTERSHIP ROUTINE COMMUNICATION, p. 54

CASE 6

Dian Chi OSXT

This is Ice Flower OVRR.

Intention: I will stand on.

OVER

intership routine communication p 548
INTERSHIP ROUTINE COMMUNICATION, p. 54

CASE 6

Ice Flower OVRR.

This is Dian Chi OSXT.

Warning: You are running into danger! Risk of collision with vessel ahead of you.

Advice you alter course to port. Advice you proceed on course wun six ait degrees true.

OVER

intership routine communication p 549
INTERSHIP ROUTINE COMMUNICATION, p. 54

CASE 6

Dian Chi OSXT

This is Ice Flower OVRR.

Message understood.

I will proceed on course wun six ait degrees true.

OUT

intership routine communication p 5410
INTERSHIP ROUTINE COMMUNICATION, p. 54

CASE 7

See slides 70-73. After that write down the dialogue for Case 7.

idioms p 46
IDIOMS, p. 46
  • AOR-E – ATLANTIC OCEAN REGION EAST (INMARSAT)
  • AOR-W – ATLANTIC OCEAN REGIONS WEST (INMARSAT)
  • DPT – DIRECT PRINTING TELEGRAPHY (terrestrial systems)
  • DSC – DIGITAL SELECTIVE CALLING (terrestrial systems)
  • EPIRB – EMERGENCY POSITION INDICATING RADIO BEACON (COSPAS/SARSTAT)
  • ETA (ETD) – ESTIMATED TIME OF ARRIVAL/DEPARTURE
  • IOR – INDIAN OCEAN REGION (INMARSAT)
  • MAREP/POSREP – MARITIME/POSITION REPORT (ship reporting system)
  • MCC – MISSION COORDINATION CENTRE (SAR)
  • MID – MARITIME IDENTIFICATION DIGITS (first three digits of MMSI)
idioms p 461
IDIOMS, p. 46
  • MMSI – MARITIME MOBILE SERVICE IDENTITY (GMDSS)
  • NAVTEX – NAVIGATIONAL TELEX (terrestrial systems)
  • NAVWNG – NAVIGATIONAL WARNING (VHF communication)
  • OOW – OFFICERS OF THE WATCH (SMCP)
  • OSC – ON-THE-SCENE COORDINATOR (SAR)
  • POR – PACIFIC OCENA REGION (INMARSAT)
  • PPI – PLAN POSITION INDICATOR (radar display, SART)
  • RCC – RESCUE AND COORDINATION CENTRE (SAR)
  • RTF – RADIO TELEPHONY (terrestrial systems)
  • SAR – SEARCH AND RESCUE
idioms p 462
IDIOMS, p. 46
  • SART – SEARCH & RESCUE RADAR TRANSPONDER (GMDSS)
  • SARSAT – STATUS RECORDING SYSTEM (satellite systems)
  • SITREP – SITUATION REPORT (SAR)
  • SMC – SAR MISSION COORDINATOR (SAR)
  • SMCP – STANDARD MARINE COMMUNICATION PHRASES
  • SOLAS – INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION OF SAFETY OF LIFE AT SEA (GMDSS)
  • SRR – SEARCH AND RESCUE REGION (SAR)
  • STCW – STANDARDS OF TRAINING, CERTIFICATION AND WATCHKEEPING FOR SEAFARERS
  • UTC – COORDINATED UNIVERSAL TIME
  • WWNWS – WORLDWIDE NAVIGATIONAL WARNING SERVICE
the ship reporting system p 24
THE SHIP REPORTING SYSTEM, p. 24
  • study the text on p. 24,
  • then watch the slides from 42-45,
  • what – in addition to spelling – is the alfa-zulu alphabet used for?
smcp supplementary exercise keys
SMCP – supplementary exercise keys

A-9

B-8

C-10

D-11

E-2

F-4

G-3

H-7

I-12

J-6

K-5

L-13

M-14

N-1

1.1.

Phrases for acquiring and providing data for a traffic image.

smcp supplementary exercise keys1
SMCP – supplementary exercise keys

1.2. Trim, list and stability

A-3

B2

C5

D1

E4

smcp supplementary exercise keys2
SMCP – supplementary exercise keys

1.3. Traffic organization service

A4

B6

C5

D1

E2

F7

G3

smcp supplementary exercise keys3
SMCP – supplementary exercise keys

1.4. Arrival, berthing and departure

A1

B5

C3

D4

E2

F6

smcp supplementary exercise keys4
SMCP – supplementary exercise keys

1.5. Preparing for loading and unloading

A4

B7

C9

D5

E10

F6

G8

H3

I1

J2

smcp supplementary exercise keys5
SMCP – supplementary exercise keys

1.6. Tanker transshipment

6

1

2

3

5

4

smcp supplementary exercise keys6
SMCP – supplementary exercise keys

1.7. Briefing on stowing and securing

1

3

5

2

4

smcp supplementary exercise keys7
1.8. (PAGE 1/2)

1-H

2-I

3-K

4-C

5-G

6-M

7-L

8-F

9-E

10-J

11-B

12-N

13-A

14-P

15-D

16-O

SMCP – supplementary exercise keys
smcp supplementary exercise keys8
1.8. (PAGE 2/2)

4-C

14-P

16-O

3-K

1-H

13-A

2-I

12-N

11-B

15-D

11. 8-F

12. 7-L

13. G-M

14. 5-G

15. 10-J

SMCP – supplementary exercise keys
idioms p 463
IDIOMS, p. 46
  • AOR-E – ATLANTIC OCEAN REGION EAST (INMARSAT)
  • AOR-W – ATLANTIC OCEAN REGIONS WEST (INMARSAT)
  • DPT – DIRECT PRINTING TELEGRAPHY (terrestrial systems)
  • DSC – DIGITAL SELECTIVE CALLING (terrestrial systems)
  • EPIRB – EMERGENCY POSITION INDICATING RADIO BEACON (COSPAS/SARSTAT)
  • ETA (ETD) – ESTIMATED TIME OF ARRIVAL/DEPARTURE (report)
  • IOR – INDIAN OCEAN REGION (INMARSAT)
  • MAREP/POSREP – MARITIME/POSITION REPORT (ship reporting system)
  • MCC – MISSION COORDINATION CENTRE (SAR)
  • MID – MARITIME IDENTIFICATION DIGITS (first three digits of MMSI)
idioms p 464
IDIOMS, p. 46
  • MMSI – MARITIME MOBILE SERVICE IDENTITY (GMDSS)
  • NAVTEX – NAVIGATIONAL TELEX (terrestrial systems)
  • NAVWNG – NAVIGATIONAL WARNING (VHF communication)
  • OOW – OFFICERS OF THE WATCH (SMCP)
  • OSC – ON-THE-SCENE COORDINATOR (SAR)
  • POR – PACIFIC OCENA REGION (INMARSAT)
  • PPI – PLAN POSITION INDICATOR (radar display, SART)
  • RCC – RESCUE AND COORDINATION CENTRE (SAR)
  • RTF – RADIO TELEPHONY (terrestrial systems)
  • SAR – SEARCH AND RESCUE
idioms p 465
IDIOMS, p. 46
  • SART – SEARCH & RESCUE RADAR TRANSPONDER (GMDSS)
  • SARSAT – STATUS RECORDING SYSTEM (satellite systems)
  • SITREP – SITUATION REPORT (SAR)
  • SMC – SAR MISSION COORDINATOR (SAR)
  • SMCP – STANDARD MARINE COMMUNICATION PHRASES
  • SOLAS – INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION OF SAFETY OF LIFE AT SEA (GMDSS)
  • SRR – SEARCH AND RESCUE REGION (SAR)
  • STCW – STANDARDS OF TRAINING, CERTIFICATION AND WATCHKEEPING FOR SEAFARERS
  • UTC – COORDINATED UNIVERSAL TIME
  • WWNWS – WORLDWIDE NAVIGATIONAL WARNING SERVICE
the ship reporting system p 241
THE SHIP REPORTING SYSTEM, p. 24
  • study the text on p. 24,
  • then watch the slides from 42-45,
  • what – in addition to spelling – is the alfa-zulu alphabet used for?
vhf communication sar revision
VHF Communication SAR - revision
  • “Mayday”, p. 56/ex.1 (see p. 16)
  • “Received Mayday”, p. 56/ex. 3 (see p. 17)
  • “Supplementary Received Mayday”, p. 57/ex.6 (see p. 17)
  • short-form SITREP, p. 57/ex.8 (see p. 20)
  • “Silence Fini”, p. 59/ex. 14 (see p. 18)
mayday p 56 ex 1 see p 16
“Mayday”p. 56/ex.1 (see p. 16)

MAYDAY

This is too tree fife seven ait seven zeero zeero zeero

Pearl Head Victor Romeo Sierra Echo.

My position: 36 degrees fower niner minutes North / zeero seven fife degrees too fife minutes west

I am on fire: fire is in engine room and number two hold.

Vessel is sinking.

Crew must abandon vessel.

Number of crew on board: wun ait.

Number of injured persons: six.

Number of lifeboats launched: too.

OVER

received mayday p 56 ex 3 see p 17
“Received Mayday”p. 56/ex. 3 (see p. 17)

MAYDAY

Pearl Head

Pearl Head

Pearl Head – Victor Romeo Sierra Echo

This is Seaborne

Seaborne

Seaborne – India Romeo Sierra Lima

RECEIVED MAYDAY

supplementary received mayday p 57 ex 6 see p 17
“Supplementary Received Mayday”p. 57/ex.6 (see p. 17)

MAYDAY

Pearl Head

Pearl Head

Pearl Head – Victor Romeo Sierra Echo

This is Empress

Empress

Empress – Zulu Alfa Kilo Papa

Information:

my position: bearing tree fower fife degress from distress position – distance six miles.

My speed: wun fower knots.

ETA distress position is within too zeero minutes.

OVER

short form sitrep p 57 ex 8 see p 20
short-form SITREPp. 57/ex.8 (see p. 20)

Priority: distress

Date and time: September 28 / time: 1305 UTC

To: RCC Norfolk Radio

From: SRU Vendor

SAR SITREP number: 1

Identity of casualty: Pearl Head – VRSE (Bulgarian registration)

Position: In position 36 degrees 49’ N / 075 degrees 25’ W

Situation:

  • message: distress
  • date and time: September 28 at 1305 hrs UTC
  • nature of distress: Pearl Head is on fire

Number of persons at risk: 18

Assistance that is required: fire fighting assistance and SAR helicopter

Co-ordinating centre: Norfolk Radio

silence fini p 59 ex 14 see p 18
“Silence Fini”p. 59/ex. 14 (see p. 18)

MAYDAY

All stations – all stations – all stations

This is Norfolk Radio.

Time: wun fife zeero zeero hours UTC.

Pearl Head – Victor Romeo Sierra Echo –

SILENCE FINI

vocabulary exercise
Vocabulary exercise

Fill in these sentences using words found on p. 45.

  • Did you transmit a DSC _______________ alert?
  • My position is _______________ ... degrees ..., distance ... kilometres / nautical miles from ... .
  • Boarding arrangements do not _______________ SOLAS - Regulations.
  • I / crew of MV ... must abandon vessel ... after explosion / collision / _______________ / flooding / piracy / armed attack / ... .
  • Vessel in position ... ~ _______________ / in danger of capsizing.
diesel engines
DIESEL ENGINES
  • Watch the video you can find at:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bSvu2qE5tgQ&feature=PlayList&p=BA93C05F7318E623&playnext=1&playnext_from=PL&index=6

2. What is it about?

diesel engines1
DIESEL ENGINES
  • Match the English and Slovene expressions (two-stroke engine).
  • Use these expressions to label the picture.
diesel engines2
DIESEL ENGINES

To see a two-stroke cycle animation, see: http://science.howstuffworks.com/two-stroke2.htm

diesel engines3
DIESEL ENGINES

Label the four strokes with Slovene and English terms.

To see a four-stroke cycle animation, see:

http://sl.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C5%A0tiritaktni_motor

diesel engines4
DIESEL ENGINES

Have a look at the picture showing the four strokes of a four-stroke engine. Label each stroke using the terms given.

  • Intake
  • Compression
  • Power
  • Exhaust
diesel engines5
DIESEL ENGINES

Watch slides 5 – 9. Work in pairs and summarize the operation of a two-stroke engine.

Watch slides 24 – 28. Work in pairs and summarize the operation of a four-stroke engine.

reversing the engine p 135
REVERSING THE ENGINE, p. 135

Read the text and answer the following questions:

  • Which diesel engine is mostly direct acting?
  • Does the engine need to be stopped first to reverse it?
  • What enables small vessels to go from ahead to astern without stopping the engine first?
  • Does “pitch” only refer to the distance travelled after one revolution of the propeller?
  • What determines the speed of a vessel equipped with a CPP?
  • Can adjusting the blades change the direction in which a vessel is travelling?
  • How do CPPs affect engines?
the fuel system
THE FUEL SYSTEM
  • What do you know about the fuel system?
  • Read the introduction on p. 148.
  • See the ppt presentation.
  • Read the text on p. 152 and do the exercise on p. 156.
  • The text on p. 152 mentions a number of tanks. Extract these and their purposes from the text.
  • Work in pairs and summarize the sequence of events when a vessel is run on HFO and MDO.
the fuel system tanks p 152
THE FUEL SYSTEM – tanks (p. 152)
  • SHORE-BASED TANKS – tanks on the shore in which bunkers are kept.
  • BUNKERTANKS – spaces on board a vessel to store fuel.
  • SETTLING TANKS – where the fuel is heated to lower the viscosity grade and separate of fuel from water and impurities.
  • DAILY SERVICE TANKS – provides the engine with fuel.
  • GRAVITY TANKS – settling tanks + daily service tanks.
  • MIXING TANKS (VENT TANK, BUFFER TANK, CIRCULATING TANK) – mix HFO + MDO to ensure gradual transition from HFO to MDO.
the fuel system1
THE FUEL SYSTEM

Read the text on pp. 148-149 and answer the following questions:

  • What is fuel specific gravity?
  • What is viscosity?
  • What is the flash point?
  • What is the pour point?
  • What is specific energy?
  • What is solubility?
  • What is the cetane number?
  • What is the sediment?
  • What is stability?
  • What is carbon residue?
  • What is the cloud point?
  • What is ash?
  • What is sulphur?
the fuel system2
THE FUEL SYSTEM

Read the text on pp. 148-149 and answer the following questions:

  • Specific gravity – density of the fuel compared to that of water.
  • Viscosity – resistance of a liquid when flowing.
  • Flash point – temperature at which fuel may be ignited (plamenišče).
  • Pour point – temperature at which the fuel can still be handled (točka tečenja).
  • Specific energy – calorific value of 1 kg of fuel.
  • Solubility – ability of a fuel to mix with another fuel.
  • Cetane number – the ease at which fuel+air will ignite.
the fuel system3
THE FUEL SYSTEM

Read the text on pp. 148-149 and answer the following questions:

  • Sediment – non-organic substances in a fuel.
  • Stability – how many sediments will be formed.
  • Carbon residue – amount of carbon deposit in nozzles, piston rings, etc.
  • Cloud point – temperature at which fuel will become hazy (motnišče).
  • Ash – non-organic non-combustible materials in a fuel.
  • Sulphur – high amount can cause corrosion.
reversing the engine p 1351
REVERSING THE ENGINE, p. 135

Read the text and answer the following questions:

  • Which diesel engine is mostly direct acting?
  • Does the engine need to be stopped first to reverse it?
  • What enables small vessels to go from ahead to astern without stopping the engine first?
  • Does “pitch” only refer to the distance travelled after one revolution of the propeller?
  • What determines the speed of a vessel equipped with a CPP?
  • Can adjusting the blades change the direction in which a vessel is travelling?
  • How do CPPs affect engines?
reversing the engine p 1352
REVERSING THE ENGINE, p. 135

Read the text and answer the following questions:

  • Slow speed diesel engine
  • Yes
  • Reversing gear
  • No (blade angle)
  • Angle of the blades
  • Yes
  • Reduce wear
lubrication p 160
LUBRICATION, p. 160

Check the text on p. 160. What are the main purposes of lubrication?

  • Prevent wear and damage (as a result of friction)
  • Cooling (carries away the heat generated by friction)
  • Prevents impurities from clogging together
  • Anti-corrosive (prevent the forming of rust)
  • Seals off pits and scratches in cylinder walls (prevents the leaking of exhaust gasses through cylinder liners)
  • Reduces engine noise
lubrication p 160 ex p 162
LUBRICATION, p. 160 (ex. p. 162)
  • A strainer filters the lubricant in the drain tank.
  • The lubricant is filtered before it is passed to the cooler.
  • A pump draws the lubricant from the drain tank.
  • A heat exchanger cools the lubricating oil.
  • Distribution branches distribute the lubricant to the various engine parts.
  • Strainers filter the lubricant after lubrication of engine parts.
  • The lube oil is returned to the drain tank.
auxiliary engines
AUXILIARY ENGINES
  • See the additional handout. Read the text on pp. 169-172 and answer the questions on the handout. You can also find these questions on the following slide.
  • Watch the ppt presentation. What have you learnt from it (in general terms)?
auxiliary engines questions
AUXILIARY ENGINES – questions
  • Which auxiliary engines does the text mention?
  • Which types of pumps are mentioned in the text and what are their purposes?
  • What is the difference between a single-acting and a double acting reciprocating pump?
  • The text also mentions a number of valves. What are they and what are their purposes?
  • What is the purpose of the anchor winch?
  • What is the purpose of warping drums at the extremities of the intermediate shaft?
  • What is the purpose of the steering engine?
  • What is the purpose of the exhaust gas boiler?
  • What is the purpose of generators?
  • What is the purpose of electric motors?
auxiliary engines answers
AUXILIARY ENGINES – answers
  • Pumps, the anchor winch, the steering engine, the exhaust gas boiler, generators and electric motors.
  • Pumps (by purpose):
  • general service pumps (various purposes, e.g., for domestic use),
  • ballast pumps (trimming),
  • fresh water pumps (to provide water for cooling systems),
  • fire pumps (to extinguish fire),
  • fuel pumps (to supply the fuel for the engine),
  • lubricating oil pumps (to supply the lubricant for the lubrication of engine parts),
  • bilge pumps (to drain superfluous liquids).

Pumps (by type):

  • Displacement pumps (reciprocating pumps and gearwheel pumps) and centrifugal pumps.
auxiliary engines answers1
AUXILIARY ENGINES – answers
  • Single-acting reciprocating pump: the liquid is drawn when the piston goes up and is forced out when the piston goes down.

Double-acting reciprocating pump: there is simultaneous suction and discharge actions.

  • Valves:
  • non-return valves (bilge pumps): prevent the liquid from flowing back.
  • discharge valve (reciprocating pump): through this valve liquid is emptied from the pump chamber.
  • suction valve (reciprocating pump): allows the liquid to enter the pump chamber.
  • To drop, heave in and pay out the anchor.
  • To pick up any slack and keep the ship’s lines tight. They are also used to shift the vessel’s berth.
auxiliary engines answers2
AUXILIARY ENGINES – answers
  • To turn the rudder (allowing the ship to make an alteration of course).
  • Use the waste heat of exhaust gasses to turn water into steam (then used for heating or driving generators that produce electricity – used to drive auxiliary engines or for the lighting system).
  • To provide electric power to the lighting system, auxiliary engines, cranes, derricks, hatches or for domestic use.
  • To actuate pumps, winches, derricks, etc.