unit 2 political beliefs and behaviors n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Unit 2: Political Beliefs and Behaviors PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Unit 2: Political Beliefs and Behaviors

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 58

Unit 2: Political Beliefs and Behaviors - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 167 Views
  • Uploaded on

Unit 2: Political Beliefs and Behaviors. Chapter 6: Public Opinion and Political Action Chapter 9: Nominations and Campaigns Chapter 10: Elections and Voting Behavior. Civic Virtue and Participation. How Can Someone Participate?. Conventional Voting Campaigns Contacting elected officials

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Unit 2: Political Beliefs and Behaviors' - arich


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
unit 2 political beliefs and behaviors

Unit 2: Political Beliefs and Behaviors

Chapter 6: Public Opinion and Political Action

Chapter 9: Nominations and Campaigns

Chapter 10: Elections and Voting Behavior

how can someone participate
How Can Someone Participate?
  • Conventional
    • Voting
    • Campaigns
    • Contacting elected officials
  • Unconventional
    • Protest
    • Civil Disobedience
    • Boycotts
how political socialization and other factors influence opinion formation
How Political Socialization and other Factors Influence Opinion Formation
  • Political Socialization
    • The process through which an individual acquires particular political orientations
    • The learning process by which people acquire their political beliefs and values
why do people vote
Why do People Vote?
  • Political Efficacy
  • Civic Duty
  • Voter Registration
    • Motor Voter Act-1993
agents of socialization
Agents of Socialization
  • Family
  • School and Peers
  • Mass Media
  • Religious Beliefs
  • Race and Ethnicity
  • Gender
  • Age
  • Region
retrospective voting
Retrospective Voting

What have you done for me lately?

political knowledge
Political Knowledge
  • Political knowledge and political participation have a reciprocal relationship.
  • Level of knowledge about history and politics low
    • Hurts Americans’ understanding of current political events
  • Geographically illiterate
  • Gender differences
causes of the decline in voter turnout
Causes of the Decline in Voter Turnout

Reading-Why voter turnout has declined

Bowling Alone

winner take all vs proportional
Winner Take All vs. Proportional

Single Member Congressional Districts

types of elections
Types of Elections

Primaries/Caucuses

General

Referendums

Initiatives

Recall

the party organizations
The Party Organizations
  • The 50 State Party Systems
    • Closed primaries: Only people who have registered with the party can vote for that party’s candidates.
    • Open primaries: Voters decide on Election Day whether they want to vote in the Democrat or Republican primary.
    • Blanket primaries: Voters are presented with a list of candidates from all parties.
    • State parties are better organized in terms of headquarters and budgets than they used to be.
primaries v caucuses
Primaries v. Caucuses
  • Over years, trend has been to use primaries rather than caucuses to choose delegates
  • Caucus is the oldest, most party-oriented method of choosing delegates to the national conventions
  • Arguments for primaries
    • More democratic
    • More representative
    • A rigorous test for the candidate
  • Arguments for caucuses
    • Caucus participants more informed; more interactive and informative
    • Unfair scheduling affects outcomes
    • Frontloading (being first in the primary calendar) gives some primary states an advantage
      • Frontloading is the tendency to choose an early date on the primary schedule
slide35

Superdelegates

      • Delegate slot to the Democratic Party’s national convention that is reserved for an elected party official
    • Some rules originating in Democratic Party have been enacted as state laws thus applying them to the Republican Party as well.
realignment
Realignment
  • Party Realignment
    • Critical
    • Deviling (blip)
    • Reinstating
    • Maintaining
  • Critical Elections
  • Secular Realignment
  • Reading-V.O. Theory of Political Realignment
congressional elections
Congressional Elections

Incumbency

Presidential Coattails

Redistricting

Gerrymandering

the american people
The American People
  • The Regional Shift
    • Population shift from east to west
    • Reapportionment: the process of reallocating seats in the House of Representatives every 10 years on the basis of the results of the census
sources of political contributions
Sources of Political Contributions
  • Political money regulated by the federal government can come from
    • Individual Contributions
    • Political Action Committee Contributions
    • Political Party Contributions
    • Member-to-Candidate Contributions
    • Candidates’ Personal Contributions
    • Public Funds
      • Donations from the general tax revenues to the campaigns of qualifying presidential candidates
      • Matching funds
      • Availability
money and campaigning
Money and Campaigning
  • The Maze of Campaign Finance Reforms
    • Federal Election Campaign Act (1974)
      • Created the Federal Election Commission (FEC) to administer campaign finance laws for federal elections
      • Created the Presidential Election Campaign Fund
      • Provided partial public financing for presidential primaries
        • Matching funds: Contributions of up to $250 are matched for candidates who meet conditions, such as limiting spending.
      • Provided full public financing for major party candidates in the general election
      • Required full disclosure and limited contributions
money and campaigning1
Money and Campaigning
  • The Maze of Campaign Finance Reforms
    • Soft Money: political contributions (not subject to contribution limits) earmarked for party-building expenses or generic party advertising
    • The McCain-Feingold Act (2002) banned soft money, increased amount of individual contributions, and limited “issue ads.”
    • 527s: independent groups that seek to influence political process but are not subject to contribution restricts because they do not directly seek election of particular candidates
pac s
PAC’s
  • Political Action Committees (PACs): created by law in 1974 to allow corporations, labor unions and other interest groups to donate money to campaigns; PACs are registered with and monitored by the FEC.
  • As of 2006 there were 4,217 PACs.
  • PACs contributed over $372.1 million to congressional candidates in 2006.
  • PACs donate to candidates who support their issue.
  • PACs do not “buy” candidates, but give to candidates who support them in the first place.
the rules of the game campaign finance
The Rules of the Game: Campaign Finance
  • Reform
    • Corrupt Practices, Hatch Act, Taft-Hartley Act
    • Federal Election Campaign Act (FECA)
    • Bipartisan Campaign Finance Reform Act 2002
    • Buckley v. Valeo, Citizens United
current rules
Current Rules
  • Political money is now regulated by the federal government under terms of BCRA of 2002
    • Outlaws unlimited and unregulated contributions to parties (soft money) and limits the amounts that individual, interest groups and political parties can give to federal candidates