slide1 n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Reading stimulates general cognitive growth—particularly verbal skills PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Reading stimulates general cognitive growth—particularly verbal skills

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 34

Reading stimulates general cognitive growth—particularly verbal skills - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 71 Views
  • Uploaded on

Reading stimulates general cognitive growth—particularly verbal skills. How will schools know if they have a strong program?. Every child will be reading!. We know what to do to ensure that virtually every child learns to read early and well.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Reading stimulates general cognitive growth—particularly verbal skills' - anise


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
slide1

Reading stimulates general cognitive

growth—particularly verbal skills

slide3

We know what to do to ensure that virtually every child learns to read early and well.

Whether or not we do it will ultimately depend upon how we feel about the fact we haven’t done it so far.

We can do this.

We have to do this.

We have the knowledge.

We have the research.

Now, we even have the resources.

bridging the 5 elements of reading
Bridging the 5 Elements of Reading
  • Phonemic Awareness
  • Phonics
  • Vocabulary
  • Fluency
  • Comprehension
the research says
The Research Says…

“Children who fall behind in first grade reading have a one in eight chance of ever catching up to grade level.”(Juel, 1994)

“Phoneme awareness is the single best predictor of reading success between kindergarten and second grade.”(Adams, Stanovich, 1995)

“Phonemic awareness is more highly related to learning to read than are tests of general intelligence, reading readiness, and listening comprehension.” (Stanovich, 1993)

who is it for
Who is it for?
  • Preschool
  • Kindergarten through second grade
  • Basic and below grade level readers
areas of instruction
Areas of instruction
  • Isolation
  • Identify
  • Categorization
  • Blending
  • Segmentation
  • Deletion
  • Addition
  • Substitution
slide8

Five Levels of Phonological Awareness

Phonological Awareness

Phonemic

Awareness

Phoneme Blending & Segmenting

Onset-Rime Blending & Segmenting

Syllable Blending & Segmenting

Sentence Segmenting

Rhyming & Alliteration

how much instructional time
How Much Instructional Time?

“No more than 20 hours over the school year.” Stanovich1993

hart and risley 1995 conducted a longitudinal study of children and families from three groups
Hart and Risley (1995) conducted a longitudinal study of children and families from three groups:
  • Professional families
  • Working-class families
  • Families on welfare
slide14

Interactions

Hart & Risley compared the mean number of interactions initiated per hour in each of the three groups.

interactions
Interactions

Hart & Risley also compared the mean number of minutes of interaction per hour in the three groups.

teaching reading is urgent
Teaching Reading is Urgent
  • A student in the 20th percentile reads books ______ minutes a day.
  • This adds up to _________words read per year.
  • A student in the 80th percentile reads books ______ minutes a day.
  • This adds up to __________ words read per year.

.7

21,000

14.2

1,146,000

slide19

Our Goal

Desired

Course

We are

Here

Actual

Course

Where are we?

What is our goal?

What course should we follow?

How are we doing?

slide20

Continuous Assessment

Data-Based Instructional Planning

Model for Student Success

Instruction

slide21

Teacher names

School Status Report-

Gives overview for principal of all classes

Teacher names

slide22

How will data Help Guide Instruction?

The Class Status Reports will help answer three important questions:

1. Who needs extra support?

2. How should groups be formed?

3. Which skills need to be emphasized?

slide23

Who Needs

Extra Support?

High Risk: 7

Moderate Risk: 3

Low Risk: 9

slide24

How will small groups be formed?

  • Group 1:
  • Students 1, 3, 5, 7, 8
  • Group 2:
  • Students 2, 4, 6, 9, 10 (12, possibly)
  • Group 3:
  • Students 11-19
summary of recommended uses of student data
Summary of Recommended Uses of Student Data
  • To identify students in need of more assistance
  • To determine if students are improving with extra assistance
  • To form flexible reading groups
early screening identifies children who need additional intervention
Early Screening Identifies Children Who Need Additional Intervention
  • 201 randomly selected children from five elementary schools serving children from mixed SES and ethnic backgrounds were followed from the beginning of first grade to the end of fourth grade.
  • Children who scored low on phonemic awareness and letter knowledge at the beginning of first grade
    • Started with lower skills
    • Made less progress
    • Fell further and further below grade level as they progressed from first through fourth grade.

For example, in one longitudinal study:

early screening identifies children at risk of reading difficulty

5.2

2.5

Early Screening Identifies Children At Risk of Reading Difficulty

5

4

Low Risk on Early Screening

Reading grade level

3

2

At Risk on Early Screening

1

1 2 3 4

Grade level corresponding to age

additional instructional intervention changes reading outcomes
Additional Instructional InterventionChanges Reading Outcomes
  • Four years later, the researchers went back to the same school. Two major changes were implemented:
  • First, a research-based comprehensive reading program was implemented for all students, and
  • Second, children at risk for reading difficulty were randomly assigned to a control group or to a group receiving substantial instructional intervention.
early intervention changes reading outcomes

With substantial instructional intervention

4.9

With research-based core but without extra instructional intervention

3.2

Intervention

Control

Early Intervention Changes Reading Outcomes

5.2

5

4

Low Risk on Early Screening

Reading grade level

2.5

3

2

At Risk on Early Screening

1

1 2 3 4

Grade level corresponding to age

research based comprehensive reading program and substantial instructional intervention
Research-Based, Comprehensive Reading Program and Substantial Instructional Intervention

Both a research-based comprehensive reading program and substantial instructional intervention were needed for children at risk of reading difficulty. Children receiving substantial additional instructional intervention beyond an effective comprehensive reading program:

  • Progressed more rapidly than control students,
  • Had reading skills more like the low risk group than the at risk group, and
  • Were reading about at grade level.
slide31

  " I am the decisive element in the classroom. 

It's my personal approach that creates the climate. 

It's my daily mood that makes the weather. 

As a teacher, I possess a tremendous power to

make a child's life miserable or joyous. 

I can be a tool of torture or an instrument of

inspiration.  I can humiliate or humor, hurt or

heal.  In all situations, it is my response that 

decides whether a crisis will be escalated to

deescalated and a child humanized or

dehumanized"   - Hiam Ginott

slide32

A Window of Opportunity

that doesn’t work.

slide33

Three Definitions of Schools

A series of autonomous classrooms that

are connected by a common parking lot.

A place where the relatively young watch

the relatively old work.

A complex organization that is built upon

relationships that require individuals to

work interdependently.

slide34

A concluding thought --

As we acquire more and more knowledge of what works…..

Another set of questions assumes more and more importance….

How do we make this kind of instruction available to every child who needs it?