Download
water water everywhere n.
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Water,Water everywhere! PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Water,Water everywhere!

Water,Water everywhere!

76 Views Download Presentation
Download Presentation

Water,Water everywhere!

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. Water,Water everywhere! Power point by Manoela Noronha

  2. Water Cycle The water cycle, also known as the hydrologic cycle or the H2O cycle, describes the continuous movement of water on, above and below the surface of the Earth. Although the balance of water on Earth remains fairly constant over time, individual water molecules can come and go, in and out of the atmosphere. The water moves from one reservoir to another, such as from river to ocean, or from the ocean to the atmosphere, by the physical processes of evaporation, condensation, precipitation, infiltration, runoff, and subsurface flow. In so doing, the water goes through different phases: liquid, solid (ice), and gas (vapor).

  3. Surface Water! Surface water is water on the surface of the planet such as in a stream, river, lake, wetland, or ocean. It can be contrasted with groundwater and atmospheric water. Non-saline surface water is replenished by precipitation and by recruitment from ground-water. It is lost through evaporation, seepage into the ground where it becomes ground-water, used by plants for transpiration, abstracted by mankind for agriculture, living, industry etc. or discharged to the sea where it becomes saline.

  4. Ice caps An ice cap is an ice mass that covers less than 50 000 km² of land area (usually covering a highland area). Masses of ice covering more than 50 000 km² are termed an ice sheet.

  5. Ground Water! Groundwater is the water located beneath the earth's surface in soil pore spaces and in the fractures of rock formations. A unit of rock or an unconsolidated deposit is called an aquifer when it can yield a usable quantity of water. The depth at which soil pore spaces or fractures and voids in rock become completely saturated with water is called the water table. Groundwater is recharged from, and eventually flows to, the surface naturally; natural discharge often occurs at springs and seeps, and can form oases or wetlands. Groundwater is also often withdrawn for agricultural, municipal and industrial use by constructing and operating extraction wells. The study of the distribution and movement of groundwater is hydrogeology, also called groundwater hydrology.

  6. Estuary! Surface water is water on the surface of the planet such as in a stream, river, lake, wetland, or ocean. It can be contrasted with groundwater and atmospheric water. Non-saline surface water is replenished by precipitation and by recruitment from ground-water. It is lost through evaporation, seepage into the ground where it becomes ground-water, used by plants for transpiration, abstracted by mankind for agriculture, living, industry etc. or discharged to the sea where it becomes saline.

  7. Ice bergs! An iceberg is a large piece of freshwater ice that has broken off a glacier or an ice shelf and is floating freely in open water.[1][2] It may subsequently become frozen into pack ice (one form of sea ice). As it drifts into shallower waters, it may come into contact with the seabed, a process referred to as seabed gouging by ice.

  8. Glaciers! A glacier () or (UK /ˈɡlæsiə/) is a persistent body of dense ice exceeding a surface area of 0.1 km² constantly moving under its own gravity; it forms where the accumulation of snow exceeds its ablation (melting and sublimation) over many years, often centuries. Glaciers slowly deform and flow due to stresses induced by their weight, creating crevasses, seracs, and other distinguishing features. They also abrade rock and debris from their substrate to create landforms such as cirques and moraines. Glaciers form only on land and are distinct from the much thinner sea ice and lake ice that form on the surface of bodies of water.

  9. What is Evaporation? Evaporation is a type of vaporization of a liquid that occurs from the surface of a liquid into a gaseous phase that is not saturated with the evaporating substance. The other type of vaporization is boiling, which, instead, occurs within the entire mass of the liquid and can also take place when the vapor phase is saturated, such as when steam is produced in a boiler. Evaporation that occurs directly from the solid phase, as commonly observed with ice or moth crystals (napthalene or paradichlorobenzine), is called sublimation

  10. What is transpiraton? Evaporation is a type of vaporization of a liquid that occurs from the surface of a liquid into a gaseous phase that is not saturated with the evaporating substance. The other type of vaporization is boiling, which, instead, occurs within the entire mass of the liquid and can also take place when the vapor phase is saturated, such as when steam is produced in a boiler. Evaporation that occurs directly from the solid phase, as commonly observed with ice or moth crystals (napthalene or paradichlorobenzine), is called sublimation

  11. What is condensation? Evaporation is a type of vaporization of a liquid that occurs from the surface of a liquid into a gaseous phase that is not saturated with the evaporating substance. The other type of vaporization is boiling, which, instead, occurs within the entire mass of the liquid and can also take place when the vapor phase is saturated, such as when steam is produced in a boiler. Evaporation that occurs directly from the solid phase, as commonly observed with ice or moth crystals (napthalene or paradichlorobenzine), is called sublimation

  12. What is precipitation? Evaporation is a type of vaporization of a liquid that occurs from the surface of a liquid into a gaseous phase that is not saturated with the evaporating substance. The other type of vaporization is boiling, which, instead, occurs within the entire mass of the liquid and can also take place when the vapor phase is saturated, such as when steam is produced in a boiler. Evaporation that occurs directly from the solid phase, as commonly observed with ice or moth crystals (napthalene or paradichlorobenzine), is called sublimation

  13. REFRENCE!!!!green-mom.comga.water.usgs.govwww.lenntech.comwww.greenpacks.orggeorgiainfo.galileo.usg.eduoceanservice.noaa.govaudubonoffloridanews.orgwww.trekearth.comwww.makewav.essaintsapbiolgy.wordpress.comwww.wallcg.comREFRENCE!!!!green-mom.comga.water.usgs.govwww.lenntech.comwww.greenpacks.orggeorgiainfo.galileo.usg.eduoceanservice.noaa.govaudubonoffloridanews.orgwww.trekearth.comwww.makewav.essaintsapbiolgy.wordpress.comwww.wallcg.com