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Accountability in the School System – an illustrative example from England. A Workshop Presentation. 10 th OECD - Japan International Seminar Tokyo, 24 th June 2005. Professor David Hopkins HSBC iNET Chair of International Leadership. Intelligent Accountability.

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Accountability in the school system an illustrative example from england a workshop presentation

Accountability in the School System –an illustrative example from England.A Workshop Presentation

10th OECD - Japan International SeminarTokyo, 24th June 2005

Professor David HopkinsHSBC iNET Chair of International Leadership


Intelligent accountability
Intelligent Accountability

“Accountability is in some ways the foundation of public services today. Without accountability there is no legitimacy; without legitimacy there is no support; without support there are no resources; and without resources there are no services……

…intelligent accountability serves two functions: it helps the system learn from itself, and it shows the public that they are getting value for money”

David Miliband at the North of England Education Conference, Belfast, 8 January 2004.


Then and now
Then and now

Now

Pre-1997



Advantages of this approach
Advantages of this approach

  • Encourages ownership of targets & improvement

  • Self evaluation focuses attention on weak spots

  • Differentiates better between different schools e.g.

    • Firm floor targets for poor performers

    • Continued stretch for high performers (>50% 5A*-C)

  • Promotes assessment for learning & personalisation

    But there’s a danger of drift – need to retain whole-system view


What s changed
What’s changed?

  • Pressure eased on our blunt levers

    • OFSTED inspections focusing on core issues, not observing every lesson

  • Increased precision using VA data

  • A more sophisticated, but more complex system, with more options at every step, but greater reliance on local judgements

  • Better incentives for success, designed to encourage system-wide improvement

  • Better solutions to failure: academies, fast-track to closure

    But this needs to bite on different types of schools


100

90

Option 6, N = 3313

80

70

Low Achieving

N = 483

60

Underperforming

Actual 5+A*-C % 2003

50

N = 539

40

Progressing

N = 1495

30

High Performing

20

N = 696

10

Leading the System

0

N = 100

0

10

20

30

40

50

60

70

80

90

100

Estimated 5+A*-C % from pupil KS3 data

Segmentation of the Secondary School System

Below 30% 5+A-C

5+A*-C >=30%, lower quartile value added

5+A*-C >=30%, 25-75th percentile value added

5+A*-C >=30%, upper quartile value added






Conclusions
Conclusions

  • The new system is better at driving improvements in the top half of the market

    • better stimuli from VA data

    • better incentives to perform and help the whole system

    • but we need something similar for primary schools

  • We have better solutions at the bottom end

    • Better intelligence about the problems: SIP & OFSTED

    • More options for dealing with failure quickly

  • But communications need to strike a balance between encouragement and tough messages that failure is unacceptable

  • CVA allows sharp focus on underperformance that is being tackled directly through SST and DfES networks

  • But we need some clear triggers for ratcheting up (or down) our approach to a school – SIPs must know what problems to look for and how to tackle them & we need access to that information

  • How will the accountability system need to adapt in the future?


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