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Conjunction

Conjunction

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Conjunction

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  1. Conjunction What’s your function?

  2. Aim: What is a conjunction? • Objectives: • Properly identifying conjunctions • Determine the various classifications of a conjunction

  3. Coordinating Conjunctions • A coordinating conjunction joins a word or word groups that are used in the same way. • And, but, for, nor, or, so, and yet—these are the seven coordinating conjunctions. • F = forA = andN = norB = butO = orY = yetS = so

  4. Examples of Coordinating Conjunctions • We found a bat and a glove. (The conjunction and connects two words) • They may be hiding in the attic or in the basement. (The conjunction or connects two phrases) • Will Rodgers once claimed “My forefathers didn’t come over on the Mayflower, but they met the boat.” (The conjunction but connects the two clauses)

  5. Coordinating Conjunctions • Coordinating conjunctions connect words, phrases, and clauses. Look at the examples that follow: • The bowl of squid eyeball stew is hot and delicious. • The squid eyeball stew is so thick that you can eat it with a fork or spoon. • Rocky, my orange tomcat, loves having his head scratched but hates getting his claws trimmed. • Rocky terrorizes the poodles next door yet adores the German shepherd across the street. • Rocky refuses to eat dry cat food, nor will he touch a saucer of squid eyeball stew. • I hate to waste a single drop of squid eyeball stew, for it is expensive and time-consuming to make. • Even though I added cream to the squid eyeball stew, Rocky ignored his serving, so I got a spoon and ate it myself.

  6. The bowl of squid eyeball stew is hot and delicious. • The squid eyeball stew is so thick that you can eat it with a fork or spoon. • Rocky, my orange tomcat, loves having his head scratched but hates getting his claws trimmed. • Rocky terrorizes the poodles next door yet adores the German shepherd across the street. • Rocky refuses to eat dry cat food, nor will he touch a saucer of squid eyeball stew. • I hate to waste a single drop of squid eyeball stew, for it is expensive and time-consuming to make. • Even though I added cream to the squid eyeball stew, Rocky ignored his serving, so I got a spoon and ate it myself.

  7. Subordinating Conjunctions • A subordinating conjunction begins a subordinate clause and connects to an independent clause. • Some sentences are complex. Such sentences have two clauses, one main [or independent] and one subordinate [or dependent].

  8. The essential ingredient in a complex sentence is the subordinate conjunction: afteralthoughasbecausebeforeeven ifeven thoughifin order that onceprovided thatrather thansinceso that thanthatthoughunless untilwhenwheneverwherewhereaswhereverwhetherwhilewhy

  9. The subordinate conjunction has two jobs. First, it provides a necessary transition between the two ideas in the sentence. This transition will indicate a time, place, or cause and effect relationship. Here are some examples: • Louisa will wash the sink full of her dirty dishes once her roommate Shane cleans his stubble and globs of shaving cream from the bathroom sink. • We looked on top of the refrigerator, where Jenny will often hide a bag of chocolate chip cookies. • Because her teeth were chattering in fear, Lynda clenched her jaw muscle while waiting for her turn to audition.

  10. The second job of the subordinate conjunction is to reduce the importance of one clause so that a reader understands which of the two ideas is more important. The more important idea belongs in the main clause, the less important in the clause introduced by a subordinate conjunction. • Read these examples: • As Samson blew out the birthday candles atop the cake, he burned the tip of his nose on a stubborn flame. • Burning his nose > blowing out candles. • Ronnie begins to sneeze violently whenever he opens the door to greet a fresh spring day. • Sneezing violently > opening the door. • Even though Dana persevered at the calculus exam, she was only adding another F beside her name in Dr. Armour's grade book. • Adding another F > persevering at the exam.

  11. Coordination vs. Subordination • Understand the difference between coordination and subordination. • A coordinating conjunction can join two main clauses that a writer wants to emphasize equally. The pattern for coordination looks like this: • main Clause + , + coordinating conjunction + main Clause. • Subordination, however, emphasizes the idea in the main clause more than the one in the subordinate clause.

  12. Coordinate or Subordinate? • Read the pairs of sentences that follow. The first version coordinates the two ideas. The second version subordinates one idea to emphasize the other. • To survive the fetal pig dissection, Rinalda agreed to make all of the incisions, and Frances promised to remove and label the organs. • To survive the fetal pig dissection, Rinalda agreed to make all of the incisions if Frances would promise to remove and label the organs. • Diana stared dreamily at the handsome Mr. McKenzie, but Olivia, who hated economics, furiously jiggled her foot, impatient to escape the boring class. • While Diana was staring dreamily at the handsome Mr. McKenzie, Olivia furiously jiggled her foot, impatient to escape the boring economics class that she hated.

  13. At a red light, Maria jumped out of Gino's car and slammed the door, for she could not tolerate one more minute of the heavy metal music that Gino insisted on blasting from the stereo. • At a red light, Maria jumped out of Gino's car and slammed the door because she could not tolerate one more minute of the heavy metal music that Gino insisted on blasting from the stereo. • Making an A in Anatomy and Physiology has not helped Sima choose a career. She might decide to make her parents happy and go to medical school, or she might use her knowledge of the human body to become a sculptor. • Making an A in Anatomy and Physiology has not helped Sima choose a career. Although she might decide to make her parents happy and go to medical school, she might also use her knowledge of the human body to become a sculptor.

  14. Kyle refused to eat the salad served with the meal, nor would he touch any green vegetable put on his plate. • After Kyle refused the salad served with the meal, he then would not touch the green vegetables put on his plate. • Joe spent seven hours studying calculus at the Mexican diner, so now he can set his math book on fire with his salsa breath. • Since Joe spent seven hours studying calculus at Taco Bell, he can now set his math book on fire with his salsa breath.

  15. After the Basketball game, we celebrated. • After we won the Basketball game, we celebrated. • Because she gets seasick, Danielle is dreading the spring break cruise, yet she might enjoy herself once she realizes how many cute guys in skimpy bathing suits parade the decks. • Even though Danielle is dreading getting seasick on the spring break cruise, she will probably enjoy herself once she realizes how many cute guys in skimpy bathing suits parade the decks.

  16. Correlative Conjunctions • A Correlative conjunction are pairs of conjunctions that join words or word groups that are used in the same way. Correlative Conjunctions Both… and not only… but (also) Either… or whether… or Neither…nor

  17. Correlative Conjunctions • Both athletes and singers must train for long hours (connects two words) • We searched not only behind the garage but also under the pecan tree. (connects two phrases) • Either your fuel line is clogged, or your carburetor needs adjusting (connects two clauses)