9.2 Musical Instruments - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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9.2 Musical Instruments

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  1. 9.2 Musical Instruments

  2. New Ideas for today • Sound and waves • Pitch • String and wind instruments

  3. Bell in vacuum Sound is a wave! • Sound is a longitudinal pressure wave in a medium (gas, liquid or solid) • Anything that vibrates a medium produces sound • Air is the most common medium for carrying sound

  4. Waves have a wavelength: distance to next crest or trough • Waves have an amplitude: peak change in pressure for sound in air • Any mechanical wave “represents the natural motion of an extended object around stable equilibrium shape or situation”

  5. The frequency, or pitch, of sound is the number of times per second that the wave repeats itself (or 1/period) wave speed = frequency × wavelength Watch one crest – moves at the speed of sound (330 m/s in air) Watch one place – the period is the time for the next crest or trough to appear

  6. http://phet.colorado.edu/simulations/sound/sound.jnlp

  7. Pitch Western musical scale constructed around A4, or 440 Hz. Crests repeat 440 times per second at one point in space!

  8. Keyboard Intervals Playing two frequencies together sounds nice when they are in small integer ratios • Octave 2:1 • Fifth 3:2 • Fourth 4:3 • Third 5:4

  9. Equal temperament • Notice anything funny? G4 / C4=1.498… • Most Western music written around half-steps Ratio between adjacent frequencies = • Makes every key sound similar • (every key equally mistuned) • Orchestras will sometimes tune • specially for particular pieces

  10. Producing Musical Sound Usually involves a resonator • An object’s natural vibration or resonant frequency is determined by its: • Mass • Size and shape • Elastic nature (stiffness) • Composition • Musical resonators • Stretched strings (violin string) • Hollow tubes (flute) • Stretched membrane (drum) Tacoma Narrows Bridge – a wind instrument!

  11. String as Harmonic Oscillator • Its mass gives it inertia • Its tension and curvature give it a restoring force • It has a stable equilibrium • Its restoring force is proportional to displacement

  12. Clicker question • Why does the low E string have copper wrapped around it? • To increase the tension of the string. • To increase the mass of the string. • To change the length of the string. • To increase the thermal conductivity of the string.

  13. Stringed instrument Modes of Oscillation Wine glass Wine glass II Fundamental Vibration (First Harmonic) • Center of string vibrates up and down • Frequency of vibration (pitch) is • proportional to tension • inversely proportional to length • inversely proportional to density (mass/length)

  14. Standing wave Modes of Oscillation • Higher-Order Vibrations (OvertonesorHarmonics) • Second harmonic is like two half-strings • Third harmonic is like three third-strings, … • Each higher mode has one more node in its oscillation • Harmonics come in integer multiples (1,2,3,4…) Fundamental 2nd Harmonic 3rd Harmonic 4th Harmonic Wavelength = l Transverse Standing Waves

  15. Courtesy of PHET

  16. Timbre Frequency analyzer Instruments have different musical fingerprint, or spectra Volume Frequency (Hz)

  17. Guitars The Sound Box Speaker • Strings don’t project sound well • Air flows around objects • Surfaces project sound much better • Air can’t flow around surfaces easily • Movement of air is substantial!

  18. Beautiful Music • Transfer of vibration to a “sound box” is important in instrument design • helps to project the sound effectively • helps to “color” the sound, making the instrument sound unique • The method of exciting the string also affects the sound. • Plucking a string transfers energy quickly and excites many vibrational modes • Bowing a string transfers energy slowly • excites the string at its fundamental frequency • each stroke adds to the string’s vibrational energy

  19. Bowing is a neat way to sustain a note using the properties of friction!

  20. Air Column as Resonant System f0 • A column of air is a harmonic oscillator • Its mass gives it inertia • Pressure gives it a restoring force • It has a stable equilibrium • Restoring forces are proportional to displacement • Stiffness of restoring forces determined by • pressure • pressure gradient 2f0 3f0

  21. Line of fire Air Column Properties Organ pipe Singing tubes Bottle • An air column vibrates as a single object • Pressure antinode occurs at center of open column • Velocity antinode occurs at ends of open column • Pitch (frequency) is • inversely proportional to column length • inversely proportional to air density Length Length

  22. Air Column Properties • Just like a string, an air column can vibrate at many different frequencies. • A closed pipe vibrates as half an open pipe • pressure antinode occurs at sealed end • frequency is half that of an open pipe Closed Column Open Column

  23. For next class: Read Sections 10.1 and 10.2 See you next class!