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History of Jazz

History of Jazz

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History of Jazz

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  1. History of Jazz Miss Paschall 8th Grade General Music

  2. Blues • Developed in the 1800s • Continues today • Exists in every time period and style • Name a modern blues musician

  3. Ragtime (1890-1917) • Composed piano music written by African Americans • Influenced jazz • Most famous Ragtime composer is Scott Joplin • Maple Leaf Rag

  4. New Orleans

  5. Beginnings of Jazz

  6. Dixieland (1900-1920s) • Originated in New Orleans • Combination of African and European styles • Large bands with cornet, clarinet, trombone, banjo, tuba, and drums • Tuba used instead of string bass; sometimes these bands marched

  7. Louis Armstrong (1901-1971) • Nickname was Satchmo • Played trumpet • Improvised vocally by scat singing • Scat-singing is improvised singing with nonsense words

  8. Louis Armstrong

  9. Louis Armstrong and Joe Oliver

  10. Louis Armstrong Listening Examples • Jeepers Creepers

  11. St. Louis Blues Louis Armstrong Listening Examples

  12. Let’s Call the Whole Thing Off(with Ella Fitzgerald) Louis Armstrong Listening Examples

  13. They Can’t Take That Away From Me (scat singing with Ella Fitzgerald) Louis Armstrong Listening Examples

  14. Hello Dolly Louis Armstrong Listening Examples

  15. Louis Armstrong Listening Examples • What a Wonderful World

  16. Boogie-Woogie (1920s-1930s) • Occurred during the Great Depression • Bands were smaller due to the Great Depression and the need to save money • Piano was added because it could play more parts than any other instrument • Count Basie Topsy

  17. Swing (1932-1942) • Large dance bands because the Great Depression was over • This happy era ended when the U.S. entered World War II • Important Swing Band Leaders: Duke Ellington, Benny Goodman, Count Basie, Glenn Miller

  18. Duke Ellington (1899-1974) • Played piano and composed many pieces • Cottontail

  19. Duke Ellington • Take the A Train

  20. Benny Goodman (1909-1986) • Played clarinet • First popular jazz band to include both white and black musicians Don’t Be That Way

  21. First jazz group to play swing music at Carnegie Hall This gave jazz musicians greater respect Sing Sing Sing Benny Goodman

  22. Count Basie (1904-1984) • Talented piano player • Led band while playing piano • Swingin the Blues

  23. Glenn Miller (1904-1944) • Played trombone • Most popular swing band at the time • Entertained troops overseas during World War II • In the Mood

  24. Bebop (1940-1950) • Groups were smaller because of World War II • Music was often fast and complex

  25. Dizzy Gillespie (1917-1993) • Mixed jazz with African and Cuban rhythms • Was a prankster and once kicked out of a band • Trademark--trumpet with a bent bell

  26. Charlie Parker (1920-1955) • Extremely talented saxophone player • Performed complex solos • Died at 34 because of drug and alcohol problems • Groovin High, Parker (sax), Gillespie(tpt)

  27. Cool Jazz (1949-1955) • Reaction to the Bebop style • Much more relaxed and less complex than Bebop music • Songs are slower and longer during this era of jazz

  28. Miles Davis (1926-1991) • Trumpet player • His influence helped the evolution of jazz • Was also a boxer and a painter • So What

  29. Decline of Jazz • Jazz was “taken out of Harlem and put in Carnegie Hall and downtown in those joints where you’ve got to be quiet. The black people split and went back to Harlem, back to the rhythm and blues, so they could have a good time.” -tenor sax player Johnny Griffin

  30. Decline of Jazz • “White kids were jamming the rock halls and the older people were staying home and watching TV. Maybe they found they couldn’t pat their feet to our music anymore.” -pianist Hampton Hawes

  31. Modern Jazz (1960-present) • Funk/Soul • Avante-Garde (free jazz) • Straight-ahead (traditional) • Latin • Jazz Fusion

  32. Funk/Soul • Reverted to basic harmonies • Used funky rhythms • James Brown, Jimi Hendrix, Sly Stone, Buddy Rich • Buddy Rich, Slow Funk

  33. Avante-Garde (free jazz) • Less structure • John Coltrane • Short life, but great jazz influence • Played saxophone solos an hour in length • Died from liver cancer at age 40 • John Coltrane, Giant Steps

  34. Straight-Ahead (traditional) • Uses improvisation • Emotional • Wynton Marsalis, Sarah Vaughn, Lincoln Center Jazz Orchestra • Sarah Vaughn • They Can’t Take That Away From Me

  35. Straight-Ahead (traditional) • Lincoln Center Jazz Orchestra • Take the A Train

  36. Straight-Ahead (traditional) • Wynton Marsalis • Goodbye

  37. Latin • African and Latin American rhythms combined with jazz • Carlos Santana, Tito Puente, Chick Corea • Chick Corea, Armando’s Tango; Wigwam

  38. Jazz Fusion • Mixed jazz with rock • Chick Corea • Bobby McFerrin • Weather Report • Blood, Sweat, and Tears • Spinning Wheel

  39. Bibliography • Jazz: Gumbo: Beginnings: 1917. PBS (2000). Retrieved January 9, 2007, from PowerMediaPlus.com. http://www.powermediaplus.com • Jazz: The Gift: 1917-1924: Part One. PBS (2000). Retrieved January 11, 2007 from PowerMediaPlus.com. http://www.powermediaplus.com • Jazz: The Gift: 1917-1924: Part Two. PBS (2000). Retrieved January 11, 2007 from PowerMediaPlus.com. http://www.powermediaplus.com