L2 motivation, self and identity: Current theoretical perspectives - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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L2 motivation, self and identity: Current theoretical perspectives

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  1. L2 motivation, self and identity: Current theoretical perspectives EmaUshioda Centre for Applied Linguistics University of Warwick Antwerp CALL 2010: Motivation and Beyond

  2. My early background in CALL

  3. Overview of my talk

  4. Traditional L2 motivation concepts Instrumental and integrative L2 motivation Gardner & Lambert 1959, 1972

  5. From external to internalprocesses of identification Reconceptualizingintegrativeness as an internal process of identification within the self-concept (Dörnyei & Csizér 2002)

  6. Motivation and possible selves

  7. L2 Motivational Self System Dörnyei 2005, 2009 • Empirical research: • Csizér & Kormos 2009 • Ryan 2009 • Taguchi et al. 2009

  8. Concepts of identity

  9. L2 motivation andcurrent concepts of identity

  10. Identities Norton 2000, 2001; Menard-Warwick 2009

  11. Linking identity perspectiveswith possible future selves

  12. Linking present L2 experience to future imagined L2 experience

  13. Motivating the personrather than the L2 learner

  14. Motivating the person: Looking beyond L2 motivation literature

  15. Dogme movement in ELT

  16. Motivational importance of orienting to students’ preferred identities Richards 2006: Analysis of classroom talk, based on Zimmerman’s (1998) model of discoursal and social identities

  17. Engaging students’ transportable identities in the digital age

  18. Fusion of personal technology useinside and outside L2 classroom

  19. To conclude … a shift in identity roles Reshaping students’ psychological relation to content and process of learning, as they assume greater autonomy (Little 1991) and greater internally regulated motivation (Ushioda 2003) cf. Ushioda et al. in press From new situated identities  potential for developing new possible future L2 selves