Download
kingdom monera bacteria n.
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Kingdom Monera (Bacteria) PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Kingdom Monera (Bacteria)

Kingdom Monera (Bacteria)

1546 Views Download Presentation
Download Presentation

Kingdom Monera (Bacteria)

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. Kingdom Monera(Bacteria) February 25 2016

  2. Learning objectives • Identify and label structures of a generic Monera • Identify and Describe the four criteria through which Monera are classified • Describe the ways in which Monera obtain/metabolize energy • Describe the three ways Monera reproduce

  3. Learning objectives Why study Bacteria?

  4. Learning objectives

  5. What we look like Structure | Classification | Energy | Growth/Reproduction | Examples

  6. What we look like • All Monera are unicellular and prokaryotic • No nucleus. DNA or RNA and ribosomes floating in cytoplasm. Structure | Classification | Energy | Growth/Reproduction | Examples

  7. What we look like • Cell membrane made of lipids • Cell wall made of peptidoglycan to protect cell • Flagellum to move Structure | Classification | Energy | Growth/Reproduction | Examples

  8. Structure | Classification | Energy | Growth/Reproduction | Examples

  9. Activity Time! Please arrange yourselves into groups of 3 When you have a group of three raise your hands

  10. Activity Time! 1 Coloured sheet 3 fact sheets 1 fact sheet per person Puzzle out which bacteria is which

  11. How we are classified Shape Cell Wall Bacterial Movement DNA/RNA Cocci Bacilli Spirilla Round and spherical Shaped like a rod (or sausage) Spiral shaped (looks like pasta) Structure | Classification | Energy | Growth/Reproduction | Examples

  12. How we are classified Clustering Behaviour can also help with classifying bacteria Some bacteria form chains, others form colonies of two cells. Shape Cell Wall Bacterial Movement DNA/RNA Structure | Classification | Energy | Growth/Reproduction | Examples

  13. How we are classified Hans Christian Gram was staining bacteria with crystal violet. He realized some retained the crystal violet and others did not. Shape Cell Wall Bacterial Movement DNA/RNA Structure | Classification | Energy | Growth/Reproduction | Examples

  14. How we are classified Shape Cell Wall Bacterial Movement DNA/RNA Structure | Classification | Energy | Growth/Reproduction | Examples

  15. How we are classified Gram-positive: cells that can retain the crystal violet (purple) Gram-negative: cells that can’t retain crystal violet (pink) Shape Cell Wall Bacterial Movement DNA/RNA Structure | Classification | Energy | Growth/Reproduction | Examples

  16. How we are classified Bacteria with a thick peptidoglycan cell wall could retain the crystal violet. Bacteria with a thin peptidoglycan layer generally couldn’t Shape Cell Wall Bacterial Movement DNA/RNA Structure | Classification | Energy | Growth/Reproduction | Examples

  17. How we are classified Flagella: whip-like projection that helps bacteria move Slime: glide on slime secretion (like a slug) No movement Shape Cell Wall Bacterial Movement DNA/RNA Structure | Classification | Energy | Growth/Reproduction | Examples

  18. How we are classified The genetic makeup of species is generally unique. Probably the most specific identification Shape Cell Wall Bacterial Movement DNA/RNA Structure | Classification | Energy | Growth/Reproduction | Examples

  19. What is the shape of this bacterium? Is it gram-negative or gram positive? Structure | Classification | Energy | Growth/Reproduction | Examples

  20. Structure | Classification | Energy | Growth/Reproduction | Examples

  21. How We Trap energy Phototrophic Autotrophs: Monerans that trap the energy of the sun Cyanobacteria Structure | Classification | Energy | Growth/Reproduction | Examples

  22. How We Trap energy Chemotrophic Autotrophs: Monerans that trap the energy of the inorganic molecules (e.g. hydrogen sulfide, nitrites, ammonia) Structure | Classification | Energy | Growth/Reproduction | Examples

  23. How We Trap energy Chemotrophic Heterotrophs (aka heterotrophs) Monera that trap the energy of the organic molecules (e.g. salmonella) Phototrophic Heterotrophs: Monera that can photosynthesize and trap energy of organic material Structure | Classification | Energy | Growth/Reproduction | Examples