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ID Job Interview Guide - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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This is a helpful guide for those who may have recently graduated with an instructional design certificate or master's degree and want some tips on what questions to expect during a job interview.

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objectives
Objectives

After completing this tutorial, you will be able to:

  • Name some types of ID models and explain what they are
  • Determine which model is appropriate to use in a given situation
  • Reflect on what your personal course design philosophy may be
  • Handle difficult interview questions with confidence
  • Overcome objections regarding lack of ID employment and educational experience

(Click next.)

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Hi, my name is Penny Cox, your guide for this self-paced tutorial.

You may be asking yourself… “Why this training? I’ve interviewed before and didn’t seem to need any help then.”

While that may be true for your individual situation, there may be many out there who feel just a bit nervous at interviewing for an instructional design position.

(I know, I was one of them too!). After all, you’ve studied hard and recently graduated and now you may be facing not just ONE interviewer, but as many as FOUR people who are going to be asking you detailed questions about what you know and how you can help their organization.

Will you be ready?

(Click next.)

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The Actual Interview

OK, so now you’re in front of the hiring manager during your interview and you start to think…“I hope I don’t forget everything I’ve learned recently. What if I flub it?”

RELAX… as your guide, I’m going to help you remember some key points about instructional design so you can answer questions with confidence.

Ready to begin?

Let’s get started…

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Peter, we have an ID position we’re trying to fill in our e-Learning division. Our goal is to be more systematic in our approach…which is why we’re thinking of adding someone to our staff.

I’d like to ask you a few questions…

Yes, of course

(Click next.)

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The ADDIE Model

You know from your studies that instructional design and development isasystematicprocess and thatAnalysis, Design, Development, ImplementationandEvaluationare generic elements that have evolved into what is now considered -- theADDIEmodel. Many other models have some basic, underlying elements of ADDIE as well.

Next, question #1…

(Click next.)

Morrison, G. R., Ross, S. M., & Kemp, J. E. (2007). Designing Effective Instruction (5th ed.). San Francisco, CA: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

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ADDIE basically stands for Analysis, Design, Development, Implementation and Evaluation. What it represents is a systematic process by which curriculum is designed and developed keeping instructional objectives in mind. I find that the needs assessment and evaluation process to be the most important key elements of the ADDIE process.

Could you define the ADDIE concept and describe how it is utilized in instructional design?

(Click next.)

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Question #1: Could you define the ADDIE concept and describe how it is utilized in instructional design?

Think for a moment…how wouldYOUanswer the question?

Write your answer down.

(Click next.)

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Needs assessmentversustask analysis-- which is which?

Probably the most critical aspect of a project is your needs assessment or needs analysis. It is this element of ADDIE from which all information is derived from and produced.

To make this easy, just remember…PROCESSversusPROCEDURE

A needs assessment is a process to determine if training would be helpful.

A task analysis is a procedure, that defines the content, such as what you’d include for a training exercise.

Next, question #2…

(Click next)

Morrison, G. R., Ross, S. M., & Kemp, J. E. (2007). Designing Effective Instruction (5th ed.). San Francisco, CA: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

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I’m glad you brought up the assessment process…

Could you differentiate between a task analysis and a needs assessment?

A needs assessment is a process used to identify gaps in performance and determine whether training is actually needed, whereas a task analysis is a procedure, or set of procedures that defines the instructional content needed.

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Question #2

I’m glad you brought up the assessment process.

Can you differentiate between a needs assessment and a task analysis?

Think for a moment…how wouldYOUanswer the question?

Write your answer down.

(Click next)

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With so many models to choose from, it’s hard to decide what’s appropriate.

  • Let’s compare some main models you may have read about:
  • ADDIE – as you know, has 5 major elements – it’s very systematic but can be costly to implement
  • Dick and Carey – is useful for 3-stage testing: one-on-one, small group, and field testing
  • Rapid Prototyping – considered a “loop” model – constant testing and revising – Used mainly for software design and development
  • CLER (Configuration, Linkages, Environment, and Resources) – is considered for implementing larger projects with many training locations
  • Next, question #3…

(Click next)

Morrison, G. R., Ross, S. M., & Kemp, J. E. (2007). Designing Effective Instruction (5th ed.). San Francisco, CA: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

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How would you compare the ADDIE model from, say, the Dick and Carey or Rapid Prototyping or CLER models?

ADDIE is a systematic process as I’ve mentioned earlier and is very structured and costly to do, and the Dick and Carey model utilizes multiple testing processes… Rapid Prototyping is a constant loop of testing and revising as content is being designed. It’s most useful in software design. The CLER model is most useful for large-scale projects involving many training locations.

I prefer the ADDIE model; however, I have no qualms about moving to a specific model if I need to. It depends on the project.

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Question #3

How would you compare the ADDIE model from, say, the Dick and Carey or Rapid Prototyping, or CLER models?

Think for a moment…how wouldYOUanswer the question?

Write your answer down.

(Click next)

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You may be asking yourself, “Which model should I use? There’s so many to consider!”

You may find that there is not a set philosophy when planning an instructional model. It may depend on the project and what is needed. Instructional design models that are based on cognitive strategies may take longer to design and develop but are worth it because they facilitate higher-level learning involving analysis, synthesis, and problem solving.

Next, question #4…

(Click next)

Morrison, G. R., Ross, S. M., & Kemp, J. E. (2007). Designing Effective Instruction (5th ed.). San Francisco, CA: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

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 What is your course designphilosophy?

My philosophy of instructional design is that there will never be a “one-size-fits-all approach.” Different models and theories work at different times. I think that it is more important to include a systematic process that takes a look at the characteristics of the learner, rather than just the content.

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Question #4

What is your course design philosophy?

Think for a moment…how wouldYOUanswer the question?

Write your answer down.

(Click next)

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Learning Objectives/Goals

It’s important to define your learning objectives right from the start. This will assist you in designing and developing your module, and knowing what these are from the beginning, will help you define what activities or steps there will be to tie in with your objectives.

Think of it this way…objectives provide the foundation of starting your activities or steps. These steps are like building blocks, starting from simple to complex, a way of enhancing that basic foundation.

Next, question #5…

(Click next)

Morrison, G. R., Ross, S. M., & Kemp, J. E. (2007). Designing Effective Instruction (5th ed.). San Francisco, CA: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

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How do you ensure your learning objectives are met?

It’s very important to define learning objectives at the beginning. I would build activities into the course that match the learning objectives and test the entire process with a small control group before fully implementing the project.

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Question #5

How do you ensure your learning objectives are met?

Think for a moment…how wouldYOUanswer the question?

Write your answer down.

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When you’ve taken training before, have you ever thought, “I just don’t get it!” ?

Sometimes, in situations where training is rolled out too quickly, the content may be missing critical components and learners become confused and don’t perform well.

It’s always important to test your materials BEFORE you finalize it tosee what improvements or corrections need to be made. Take a look at your learning objectives… do they match your assessment? Are they measurable?

Next, question #6…

(Click next)

Morrison, G. R., Ross, S. M., & Kemp, J. E. (2007). Designing Effective Instruction (5th ed.). San Francisco, CA: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

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If you designed a course, and the instructor comes to you saying the attendees just are not “getting it,” what would you say or do?

When I was hired to train customer service reps for a telecom company, the material given to me on product knowledge contained nothing about basic telephony.

I solved this problem by adding some basic information on wiring and how it worked with equipment; then transitioned the examples to go from simple to more complex within the instruction.

The CSRs were then better able to understand the relationship and performed better on their tests.

(Click next)

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Question #6

If you designed a course, and the instructor comes to you saying the attendees just are not “getting it,” what would you say or do?

Think for a moment…how wouldYOUanswer the question?

Write your answer down.

(Click next)

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Changing Demographics

With learners, you must consider a constantly changing, and more global, diverse audience…one that will include military personnel, and those with disabilities;the young and more mature adult learners (andragogy).

Make sure your content is engaging and effective, and can be accessed by ALL learners with audio, visual and text elements geared toward a diverse group.

Next, question #7…

(Click next)

Morrison, G. R., Ross, S. M., & Kemp, J. E. (2007). Designing Effective Instruction (5th ed.). San Francisco, CA: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

slide26

Do you have any experience working with adult learners, Diane?  Or members of the military?  Any diversity training?

I’ve trained adult learners in the past, and while I have not worked with military learners, I do understand they have special needs because of constant deployment and family issues – things that make learning a challenge.

And, diversity is also something I’m very familiar with in the workplace and try to build my material with subject matter that everyone can relate to. I also keep accessibility in mind for all learners.

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Question #7

Do you have any experience working with adult learners?  Or members of the military?  Any diversity training?

Think for a moment…how wouldYOUanswer the question?

Write your answer down.

(Click next)

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About software applications…

When designing curriculum, it benefits you to have some knowledge and practical experience in various software applications.

Some Learning Management Systems (LMS) include Moodle, Angel or Blackboard…

Photoshop, PowerPoint, Flash, Captivate, and Camtasia allow for engaging multimedia design and interactivity…

Dreamweaver automatically combines HTML coding in its software to tell Web browsers how to display Web pages’ words and images.

Next, question #8...

(Click next)

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So, I’d like to know more about your experience designing courses. What software did you use?Do you have any LMS experience using Moodle, Angel or Blackboard? What about other software, such as Flash, Captivate, Photoshop, or Elluminate?

Any HTML coding?

Let me show you some examples of things I’ve produced for real-life scenarios while atWalden University.

I’ve already worked with Elluminate, Moodle and Flash. I’m quite proficient in computer hardware and software applications and feel confident in utilizing these tools for actual projects, even if I haven’t worked with them before.

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Question # 8

I’d like to know more about your experience designing courses. What software did you use? Do you have any LMS experience using Moodle, Angel or Blackboard? What about other software, such as Flash, Captivate, Photoshop, or Elluminate? Any HTML coding?

Think for a moment…how wouldYOUanswer the question?

Write your answer down.

(Click next)

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Don’t be Shy!

Tell the interviewer how you come up with innovative ideas for your projects and the creative process you use to accomplish this.

Mention that you’re careful to adhere to style and legal standards, such as maintaining document integrity and copyright infringement issues.

Next, question #9…

(Click next)

Morrison, G. R., Ross, S. M., & Kemp, J. E. (2007). Designing Effective Instruction (5th ed.). San Francisco, CA: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

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I create learning activities with Photoshop, PowerPoint and Flash applications. I’m constantly researching the Internet for new technologies and materials.

I take my ideas and utilize some existing material that’s readily available from Internet resources. For copyright material, I ask permission and credit the source.

I’m impressed with your e-Portfolio samples, Maria…How do you build interactivity into your design? Do you design them from scratch or find existing materials, such as a book or tutorial?

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Question #9

I’m impressed with your e-Portfolio samples…How do you build interactivity into your design? Do you design them from scratch or find existing materials, such as a book or tutorial?

Think for a moment…how wouldYOUanswer the question?

Write your answer down.

(Click next)

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Overcoming Objections

  • Don't provide ammunition or opportunities for the interviewer to raise objections by making comments about your lack of experience, education, training, etc. Also, be sure not to mention any obstacles in your personal life that may raise a red flag about your ability to do the job well. Don't mention that you're in the midst of a divorce, that your teenage child was recently arrested, or that you are having problems with your child's babysitter. (Moss, 2007)
  • Last, but not least… SELL yourself!...
  • Provide details about your educational qualifications
  • Summarize your training in instructional design
  • Highlight your achievements

Next, two common objections you may encounter…

(Click next)

Published August 13, 2007 by Mary Moss

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Objection #1: “You don't have enough experience in this field.”

Sample response:“While I realize I don't have as much experience as some other applicants, I am willing to learn what is needed to perform the job effectively. I do have training and experience in several other related areas upon which I can draw as I learn the specifics of this position. I am willing to ask questions and seek advice of co-workers who are familiar with the job duties of this position.”

Objection #2: “You don't have enough education.”

Sample response:“I realize the job description indicates a 4-year degree is required for the position. While I don't have a 4-year degree, I have substantial college coursework toward a master’s degree in ID (or certificate in ID). I also have extensive training and experience in this type of work. I participated in a work study program in high school and have attended workshops and adult education courses in this area. I am intelligent and intuitive and believe I have the maturity and background to be the ideal candidate for this position.”

Next, Question #10

Published August 13, 2007 by Mary Moss

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Darlene, tell me about your qualifications for this job… I notice you don’t have much actual experience in this field.

Having just graduated with a master’s in Instructional Design from WaldenUniv…we covered many aspects of designing content… in my last project, I designed and developed two instructional modules…both were tested and well received.

Despite not having actual experience, I believe I can contribute much to your organization…

(Click next)

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Question #10

Tell me about your qualifications for this job.

I notice you don’t have much actual education or experience in this field.

Think for a moment…how wouldYOUanswer the question?

Write your answer down.

(Click next)

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Congratulations!You have successfully completed this training module!

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Thank you!

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job interview

guide

c r e d i t s

design & development:

photos:

created for:

instructor:

R. Penny Coxcontact:p_cox2001@yahoo.com

courtesy ofMicrosoft Corporation

Walden UniversityInstructional Design Master’s Program

Dr. Mark Clauburg

cg

The Cox Group