a partnership approach to invasive species management the maryland nutria project l.
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Tudor Farms. A Partnership Approach to Invasive Species Management: The Maryland Nutria Project. 1999, nutria established in 15 states (nutria moved into Tennessee) 2003, Nutria are an invasive species in 16 states (Add New Mexico and South Carolina?)

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slide4

1999, nutria established in 15 states (nutria moved into Tennessee)

  • 2003, Nutria are an invasive species in 16 states (Add New Mexico and South Carolina?)
  • Nationwide, nutria occupy more than 1,046,425 acres of federal lands managed by USFWS
slide5

Nutria Distribution on the Delmarva Peninsula

  • 1943: Introduced.
  • 1968: <150 1990s: 35,000 - 50,000
  • Current range: Wilmington, DE to Chincoteague, VA
  • Abundant at Back Bay NWR
  • Increasing sightings on Maryland’s western shore.
slide6

Nutria Foraging Behavior

  • Favored foods: 3-square bulrush, Cattail.
  • Roots, rhizomes, and tubers.
  • Root mat compromised.
  • Agricultural crops.
slide8

Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge

1938

Aerial Photo

1989

Aerial Photo

slide10

Tudor

Farms

Marsh Restoration/Nutria Control Partners

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge

Chesapeake Bay Field Office

Maryland Department of

Natural Resources

USDA, Wildlife Services

Ducks Unlimited, Inc.

University of Maryland

Eastern Shore

USGS, Maryland Cooperative

Fish and Wildlife Research Unit

Chesapeake Bay

Foundation

University of Maryland

College Park

USGS, Patuxent Wildlife

Research Center

Tudor Farms, Inc.

Maryland Department of

the Environment

National Civilian Conservation

Corps, Americorps

National Trappers

Association

International Association

of Fish and Wildlife

Agencies

Friends of Blackwater

National Wildlife Refuge

Salisbury Zoo

The Wildlife Society

MD/DE Chapter

National Aquarium

in Baltimore

Maryland Fur

Trappers Association

National Fish and

Wildlife Foundation

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers,

Baltimore District

Congressman Wayne

T. Gilchrest

maryland nutria project eradication goals
Maryland Nutria Project Eradication Goals
  • Develop systematic depopulation strategies
  • Develop detection techniques
  • Develop new control tools
  • Determine feasibility of eradication Delmarva-wide
  • Develop techniques that are applicable elsewhere
nutria eradication basic strategy
Nutria Eradication Basic Strategy
  • Aggressive depopulation to systematically eradicate
    • Integrated techniques
      • Trapping, Shooting, Dogs
      • GIS/GPS
  • Follow-up monitoring to prevent reinfestation
    • Detect residual populations
    • Repeated quarterly or seasonally
trapping units
Trapping Units
  • 40 acres in size
  • Trapped sequentially
  • Bounded by non-nutria habitat
  • Push nutria into un-trapped units
techniques developed enhanced
Techniques Developed/Enhanced
  • Floating Conibears
  • Floating Platforms w/ Drowning Footholds
  • Snares for Live Capture
  • False bed sets
  • Detection Dogs
  • Remote Camera Detection
  • Attractants
monitoring
Monitoring
  • Begins 3 Month Intervals post treatment
    • Allow sign deterioration
    • Reproductive cycle
  • Stratify effort
    • High Priority (every 3 months)
    • Medium Priority (every 6 months)
    • Low Priority (every 12 months)
  • Priority levels based on initial capture densities or previous monitoring findings
contact

Contact

Steve Kendrot

USDA APHIS Wildlife Services

skendrot@aphis.usda.gov