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Unit 2: Civil Rights Heroes

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  1. Unit 2: Civil Rights Heroes The song you are going to listen to is called Abraham, Martin & John, sung by Dion. Script for the Recording next previous back index break over

  2. Unit 2: Civil Rights Heroes NCE-B3 Abraham, Martin & John Dion Has anybody here, Seen my old friend Abraham, Can you tell me, where he’s gone, He freed a lotta people, But it seems the good die young,

  3. Unit 2: Civil Rights Heroes NCE-B3 I just looked around, And he’s gone. Has anybody here, Seen my old friend John, Can you tell me, where he’s gone, He freed a lotta people, But it seems the good die young, I just looked around, And he’s gone. next previous back index break over

  4. Unit 2: Civil Rights Heroes NCE-B3 Has anybody here, Seen my old friend Martin, Can you tell me, where he’s gone He freed a lotta people, But it seems the good die young, I just looked around, And he’s gone. Didn’t you love the things they stood for, next previous back index break over

  5. Unit 2: Civil Rights Heroes NCE-B3 Didn’t they try to find some good for you and me, And we’ll be free, Someday soon it’s gonna be one day, Has anybody here, Seen my old friend Bobby, Can you tell me, where he’s gone, I thought I saw him walkin’ up over the hill, With Abraham, Martin and John. next previous back index break over

  6. Abraham Lincoln • 16th president of the U.S.A. He issued the Emancipation Proclamation(奴隶解放宣言) that declared forever free those slaves within the Confederacy(南部邦联). • On April 14, 1865, he was assassinated at Ford’s Theatre in Washington.

  7. Abraham Lincoln • Abraham Lincoln was the sixteenth president of the US. As President, he issued the Emancipation Proclamation (奴隶解放宣言) that declared forever free those slaves within the Confederacy (南部邦联). • During the Civil War Lincoln stated most movingly in dedicating the military cemetery at Gettysburg: “that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain -- that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom -- and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.”

  8. Abraham Lincoln • On April 14, 1865, Lincoln was assassinated at Ford’s Theatre in Washington by John Wilkes Booth, an actor, who somehow thought he was helping the South. The opposite was the result, for with Lincoln’s death, the possibility of peace died.

  9. Martin Luther King • one of the most important figure in civil rights campaign. • “I have a dream!” • He was shot while standing on the balcony of the Lorraine Motel in Memphis, Tennessee on April 4, 1968.

  10. Dr. King was a pivotal (关键) figure in the Civil Rights Movement. His lectures and dialogues stirred (激起) the concern and sparked the conscience of a generation. • In one of his speeches, he said, “I have a dream that my four children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character. I have a dream today. I have a dream that ... one day right there in Alabama, little black boys and black girls will be able to join hands with the little white boys and white girls as sisters and brothers. I have a dream today.” • Dr. King was shot while standing on the balcony of the Lorraine Motel in Memphis, Tennessee on April 4, 1968. Dr. King was in Memphis to help lead sanitation workers in a protest against low wages and intolerable working conditions.

  11. John F. Kennedy • As president, he took vigorous action in the cause of equal rights, calling for new civil rights legislation. He was the youngest man elected President and was the youngest to die. • On Nov. 22, 1963, he was killed by an assassin’s bullets as his motorcade wound through Dallas, Texas.

  12. John Fitzgerald Kennedy was the 35th president of the US. • In his Inaugural Address (就职演说) he said: “Ask not what your country can do for you -- ask what you can do for your country.” As President, he took vigorous action in the cause of equal rights, calling for new civil rights legislation. • On November 22, 1963, when he was hardly past his first thousand days in office, John F. Kennedy was killed by an assassin’s bullets as his motorcade (汽车队) wound through Dallas, Texas. Kennedy was the youngest man elected President; he was the youngest to die.

  13. Robert F. Kennedy / Bobby K. • The brother of President John F. Kennedy. He was appointed attorney general (司法部长) of the United States in the early 1960s. • The Civil Right Act

  14. Bobby Kennedy or Robert F. Kennedy, was the brother of President John F. Kennedy. He was appointed Attorney General (司法部长) of the United States in the early 1960s. • In September 1962, Attorney General Kennedy enforced a Federal court order admitting the first African American student -- James Meredith -- to the University of Mississippi. The riot (暴动) that had followed Meredith’s registration (注册) had left two dead and hundreds injured.

  15. Robert Kennedy saw voting as the key to racial (种族的) justice (正义) and collaborated (合作) with President Kennedy when he proposed the most far-reaching civil rights statute since Reconstruction, the Civil Rights Act of 1964, passed after President Kennedy was slain on November 22, 1963. • Robert Francis Kennedy was slain on June 5, 1968 at the Ambassador Hotel in Los Angeles, California. He was 42 years old. Although his life was cut short, Robert Kennedy’s vision and ideals live on today.

  16. The Civil-Rights Movement in the U.S. Black Africans were first brought as slaves to what was to become the United States in the seventeenth century. Slavery was strongest in the South, where large plantations grew cotton, tobacco, and other crops. Towards the end of the 18th century, a growing demand for cotton led to an increase in the previous index break over more back

  17. Region. Slavery was less profitable in the North, however, and much of the opposition to slavery came from the northern states. The tension between the North and the South over the issue of slavery led to the Civil War in 1861. With the victory of the North, slavery was abolished. Discrimination, however, did not end. Black Americans were treated as second next previous index break over back

  18. Class citizens, especially in the South. Dissatisfaction with unfair treatment eventually led to the civil rights protests of the 1950s and 1960s that brought about government action aimed at reducing discrimination. As a result, African Americans have come a long way in the last fifty years, but they still find themselves at a disadvantage in comparison with Americans of European descent. Only 17 per cent of the next previous index break over back

  19. black population are able to finish higher education, in contrast to 28 per cent of whites. Incomes for the average white family were just over $44,000 in 1999. For an average black family, however, the figure was in the region of $25,000. Not one of the chief executive officers of the top 500 companies is black. Anyway, the civil-rights movement in the U.S. still has a long way to go. next previous index break over back

  20. Unit 2: Civil Rights Heroes NCE-B2 Cultural Notes The Underground Railroad: a secret system used in the US before the Civil War for helping thousands of slaves to escape to the free states or Canada. The slaves were called “passengers”, the people who helped them were “conductors”, and the slaves hid in “stations” (safe houses) along the way. more previous back index break over

  21. Unit 2: Civil Rights Heroes NCE-B2 back index break

  22. Unit 2: Civil Rights Heroes NCE-B2 Cultural Notes Uncle Tom’s Cabin: a novel (1852) by the US writer Harriet Beecher Stowe. According to legend, when Abraham Lincoln met Harriet Beecher Stowe in 1862 he said, "So you're the little woman who wrote the book that started this Great War!" more

  23. Unit 2: Civil Rights Heroes NCE-B2 Uncle Tom’s Cabin ---based on the life in narrative of Josiah Henson, a runaway slave ---brought the evils of slavery to the attention of Americans ---contributed to the outbreak of war The book had a strong emotional appeal that moved and inspired people in a way that political speeches, tracts and newspapers accounts could not duplicate. more

  24. Unit 2: Civil Rights Heroes NCE-B2 Uncle Tom’s Cabin In this novel, Tom is a kind slave who is badly treated and finally killed by Simon Legree. The name Uncle Tom is sometimes used as an insult to describe an African-American who has too much respect for white people. back

  25. Unit 2: Civil Rights Heroes NCE-B2 Moses: ( in the Bible) the leader who brought the Israelites out of slavery in Egypt and led them to the Promised Land.

  26. Unit 2: Civil Rights Heroes NCE-B2 As an everlasting possession I will give you and your descendants after you the land in which you now are aliens, all the land of Canaan, and I will be God to your descendants. 我要把你们居此不久的这片土地,即全部迦南的土地赐给你和你的后代,作为永久的财产。我是你子孙后代的上帝。 back

  27. Unit 2: Civil Rights Heroes NCE-B2 Cultural Notes Quaker : any member of the Society of Friends, a religious group established in England in the 1650s by George Fox. They were originally called Quakers because members were thought to “quake” or shake with religious excitement. Quakers worship Christ without any formal ceremony or fixed beliefs, and their meetings often involve silent thought or prayer. They are more index break over

  28. Popular abolitionist emblem,designed in 1787 Unit 2: Civil Rights Heroes NCE-B2 Cultural Notes strongly opposed to violence and war, and are active in education and charity work. previous back index break over

  29. Unit 2: Civil Rights Heroes NCE-B2 Cultural Notes Grand Central Terminal: the best-known railway station in the US. It is on East 42nd Street in New York and was completed in 1913 in the American Beaux Art style. The main area is very large, and the trains enter and leave the station on 123 tracks, arranged on two levels. The station is often crowded: You can’t move in there---it’s like Grand Central Station! back index break over

  30. Unit 2: Civil Rights Heroes NCE-B2 Cultural Notes Methodist: a member of the Methodist Church, the largest of the Protestant Free Churches in Britain and the US. It was established in 1739 by John Wesley as part of the Church of England but it became separate from it in 1795. It was introduced into the US in the 18th century and today has over 50 million members around the world. It emphasized the importance of moral issues, both personal and social. back index break over

  31. Web-links NCE-B3 Uncle Tom’s Cabin http://www.uncletomscabin.org/ Moses: ( in the Bible) http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/10596a.htm Quaker http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/06304b.htm next previous back index break over

  32. Web-links NCE-B3 Grand Central Terminal http://www.nyctourist.com/grandcentral1.htm Methodist http://www.methodist.org.uk/ next previous back index break over

  33. Writing Strategy Using Library resources You will by now be used to using brainstorming to generate information on topics you write about. However, in writing about complex and serious issues, you cannot expect to generated all the ideas by brainstorming, which focus on what you already know. Suppose you want to write about the impact of the civil-rights movement in America. You may already have some ideas on this issue. By brainstorming, you can develop a general framework. However, that is not sufficient for you to write a paper on such a serious Writing Strategy more previous index break over back

  34. Writing Strategy and complex topic. You will find it necessary to do some library research on the issue. A college library usually has the following basic sources which help you locate the information you need: General References General references include dictionaries, encyclopedias, and atlases. They can give you a basic understanding of a topic. Index, Catalogs They give information on what has been written and published about a subject. Writing Strategy more previous index break over back

  35. Writing Strategy Abstracts Abstracts not only list subject headings, but also summarize key information in a highly condensed form. Bibliographies A bibliography---a list of publications on a subject---gives you an overview of what has been published on a given subject. Follow the research guides provided by each library and you should be able to find the necessary information for your essay. Writing Strategy more previous index break over back