nixon s domestic policy l.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Nixon’s Domestic Policy PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Nixon’s Domestic Policy

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 30

Nixon’s Domestic Policy - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 183 Views
  • Uploaded on

Nixon’s Domestic Policy. Nixon in Person. Unlike most politicians, Richard Nixon was a reserved and remote man Many respected him for his experience and political strategies He had few close friends, and often people thought he was cold and even had a mean side with his enemies

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Nixon’s Domestic Policy' - nalanie


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
nixon in person
Nixon in Person
  • Unlike most politicians, Richard Nixon was a reserved and remote man
  • Many respected him for his experience and political strategies
  • He had few close friends, and often people thought he was cold and even had a mean side with his enemies
  • Nixon avoided his Cabinet and used his White House staff to help develop policies
domestic policy
Domestic Policy
  • Restoring law and order was one of them most important aspects of Nixon’s domestic policy
  • Inflation
    • Inflation had doubled between 1965 and 1968
    • Nixon began deficit spending or spending more money in a year than the government receives in revenues
    • He also proposed a 90-day freeze on wage, prices, and rents
domestic policy4
Domestic Policy
  • Oil Crisis
    • The nation’s growing population and economy used more energy every year
    • Coal had environmental concerns
    • Americans depended on cheap oil for about 1/3 of energy needs
    • After the U.S. backed Israel, Arab members of OPEC imposed an embargo or ban on shipping oil to the U.S.
    • Oil prices skyrocketed
    • The result was a recession
domestic policy5
Domestic Policy
  • Social Programs
    • Nixon hoped to cut spending by shutting down some of the Great Society programs
    • Nixon called for a new partnership between the federal government and the state governments know as the New Federalism
    • States would assume greater responsibility for the well-being of their own citizens
the southern strategy
The “Southern Strategy”
  • Nixon believed he had little to gain by supporting advances in civil rights
  • “There are those who want instant integration and those who want segregation forever, I believe that we need to have a middle course between those two extremes.”
  • Southern strategy was to win over white southern Democrats
  • Nixon repeatedly opposed acts to help African Americans
the first moon landing
The First Moon Landing
  • On July 20, 1969, Neil Armstrong descended from the Eagle lunar landing craft and set foot on the moon’s surface
  • Television viewers around the world witnessed this triumph of the Apollo program
  • The astronauts of Apollo 11 were welcomed back as heroes
richard m nixon

Richard M. Nixon

Foreign Policy: 1968-1974

“I’ve always thought this country could run itself domestically without a President.”

henry kissinger
Henry Kissinger
  • Nixon’s National Security Advisor (1969-1973) Secretary of State in 1973
  • Nixon’s closest and most trusted advisor
  • Believed in ‘realpolitik’ - practical politics
    • Decisions based on maintaining strength, not moral principles
    • Détente - a relaxing of tensions between two nations.
nixon and china
Nixon and China
  • Nixon and Kissinger took different approach to dealing with Communist China.
  • US began series of moves to improve relations with China.
  • “Ping-pong diplomacy”
  • Nixon traveled to China in Feb. of 1972
  • Met with Chairman Mao and Premier Zhou Enlai (to Nixon’s right).
  • Nixon politically popular as a result.
the soviet union and china
The Soviet Union and China
  • Soviet Union (Russia or USSR) communist but enemies of China.
  • Nixon exploited this difference.
  • Vietnam received majority of aid from Russia.
  • Better relations with China could be a bargaining chip to end Vietnam War.
strategic arms limitations talks salt i
Strategic Arms Limitations Talks (SALT I)
  • Nixon visited Soviet Union in 1972.
  • First US President inside the Kremlin
  • SALT I Treaty signed in 1972 by US and USSR
    • Wanted to limit the proliferation (expansion) of offensive nuclear weapons.
    • Froze the number of ICBMs and SLBMs at 1972 levels.
    • Restricted the development of antiballistic missile systems.
personal diplomacy begins to pay off
Personal Diplomacy begins to pay off
  • Paris Peace talks stalled since 1968. Renewed periodically.
  • China relations, USSR visit created a bargaining ploy to end the war in Vietnam
  • National Security Advisor Henry Kissinger claimed ”peace is at hand” - just before 1972 election.
  • December 1972, new round of bombing - “Christmas bombings” (Nixon - a “mad bomber”)
  • Bombed Hanoi, North Vietnam, mined the harbor
  • Vietnam resumes negotiations with US
1973 paris peace accords
1973 - Paris Peace Accords
  • The United States would withdraw all its forces from South Vietnam within 60 days.
  • All prisoners of war would be released.
  • All parties to the agreement would end military activities in Laos and Cambodia.
  • The 17th parallel would continue to divide North and South Vietnam until the country could be reunited.
nixon s foreign policy legacy
Nixon’s Foreign Policy Legacy
  • Nixon’s focus and most intense interest was always foreign policy
  • His achievements are often overshadowed by the Watergate scandal.
  • Nixon effectively ended the war in Vietnam
  • Nixon ushered in a period of détente with former US enemies
arab israeli tensions
Arab-Israeli Tensions
  • Since Israel’s declaration of independence in 1948, Arab nations had engaged in wars with the Jewish state, and none had opened up diplomatic relations with Israel by the 1970s.
    • The Arabs, especially Palestinians, considered Israeli territory rightfully theirs.
    • The Muslim (and Jewish) holy city of Jerusalem was located within Israel’s borders.
    • United States was Israel’s steadfast ally from the beginning.
the six day war 1967
The Six-Day War (1967)
  • Israel won a stunning victory against the Arabs in the Six-Day War of 1967.
  • Expanded the nation’s borders to include:
    • the Golan Heights
    • the West Bank
    • the Gaza Strip
    • the Sinai Peninsula.
  • Israel assumed the Arabs would not dare to attack them again so soon.
  • Arabs were as determined as ever to reclaim their territory and eliminate the Jewish state.
israeli territorial gains
Israeli Territorial Gains
  • The pale blue indicates Israeli territory before the Six-Day War.
  • The slightly darker blue indicates Israeli territorial gains.
    • Six-Day War (1967) resulted in massive territorial expansion for Israel especially on the Sinai Peninsula.
the yom kippur war 1973
The Yom Kippur War (1973)
  • October 6, 1973, the Arab nations of Egypt and Syria launched a surprise attack against Israel.
    • The Arabs chose the date with a very specific reason in mind: it coincided with Yom Kippur, Judaism’s holiest holiday.
      • The Arabs correctly assumed that Israel would be most vulnerable on this day.
      • Indeed, for the first two days of the war, the Israelis could not stop their enemies’ advance.
  • The war lasted a mere 20 days with intense fighting and thousands killed.
american involvement
American Involvement
  • America actively supported Israel, both politically and militarily, from the beginning.
  • Nixon personally ordered that American arms be airlifted to Israel.
  • The conflict resembled a proxy (Cold War) war, since it pitted America-friendly Israel vs. Egypt and Syria, long under Soviet influence.
the oil crisis
The Oil Crisis
  • In response to highly effective American involvement in the war, Arab nations declared on October 19 that they would not sell oil to the U.S., because of its expressed support for Israel.
    • They later cut exports to the Netherlands and other nations backing Israel.
  • Within a few months, the price of a barrel of oil quadrupled!
    • This marked the first time Arab nations would use oil as a political and economic weapon.
effects of the war
Effects of the War
  • No territorial concessions were made; each side claimed victory for itself.
  • Egypt drifted away from the Soviet Union and towards America, largely because of Kissinger’s developing relationship with Egyptian President Anwar Sadat.
    • Israel remained America’s close ally; likewise, Syria retained its alignment with the U.S.S.R.
    • As a result of the diplomatic shift, Egypt became more willing to negotiate with Israel.
      • In 1978, the Camp David Accords would make Egypt the first Arab nation to formally recognize the Jewish state.
  • The oil embargo had a devastating impact on the U.S. economy.
did nixon succeed in the middle east
Did Nixon Succeed in the Middle East?
  • In keeping with the Nixon Doctrine, he stood by an American ally, providing aid and supplies, but not manpower, for a successful defense.
  • With Kissinger’s aid, he also reduced the Soviet sphere of influence, of which Egypt was no longer a part by war’s end.
nixon s foreign policy legacy30
Nixon’s Foreign Policy Legacy
  • Nixon’s focus and most intense interest was always foreign policy
  • His achievements are often overshadowed by the Watergate scandal.
  • Nixon effectively ended the war in Vietnam
  • Nixon ushered in a period of détente with former US enemies