prohibition and bootlegging in canada in the 1920 s l.
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Prohibition and Bootlegging In Canada in the 1920’s. Prohibition. The Temperance Movement arose in the early 20 th century and it was a collection of women and religious groups.

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prohibition
Prohibition

The Temperance Movement arose in the early 20th century and it was a collection of women and religious groups.

These groups pressured the government to ban the production, consumption, distribution, and sale of liquors (including wine and beer).

They believed that it was immoral and evil to drink alcohol, especially during the war (the grain used to make alcohol, could be used to feed the troops overseas)

These groups spread across the country with the government searching out and stopping the Rum Runners.

By 1917, all provinces (except Quebec) adopted prohibition.

prohibition3
Prohibition

The Pros

  • Crime rate dropped
  • Child and wife abuse decreased
  • Workers no longer spent their paycheques at the bar
  • Higher productivity in the workplace
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Prohibition

The Cons

  • Gangsters made a fortune smuggling liquor
  • Provincial governments lost millions of dollars in potential taxes on alcohol
  • Enforcement was extremely difficult – people could easily acquire alcohol
  • People could consume alcohol for ‘medical’ purposes with a prescription
  • Prohibition laws were largely ignored by the middle class
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Prohibition

Prohibition terms

  • Speakeasies and blind pigs – secret and private clubs that served alcohol
  • Bootleggers – people who made home-made alcohol for sale and consumption
  • Rum Runners – Canadians who smuggled alcohol across the border to the US. (eg., Hiram Walker – Canadian Club Whisky)
  • Rum Alley – Windsor / Detroit area
  • Moonshine – illegal liquor