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School-Wide Positive Behavior Support: Defining Features & Outcomes

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  1. School-Wide Positive Behavior Support: Defining Features & Outcomes George Sugai Center on Positive Behavioral Interventions & Supports University of Connecticut July 28, 2005 www.pbis.org www.swis.org

  2. Purpose Provide brief overview of SWPBS implementation • Why? • Features? • Outcomes?

  3. Why support SWPBS implementation? • Increase effectiveness of academic programming • Reduce incidence & prevalence of problem behavior • Increase effectiveness & efficiency of existing behavioral interventions & supports • Improve school, family, & community relations & functioning

  4. Good Intentions:Competing, Inter-related National Goals • Improve literacy, math, geography, science, etc. • Make schools safe, caring, & focused on teaching & learning • Improve student character & citizenship • Eliminate bullying • Prevent drug use • Prepare for postsecondary education • Provide a free & appropriate education for all • Prepare viable workforce • Affect rates of high risk, antisocial behavior • Leave no child behind • Etc….

  5. What do we worry about? • Overuse of “Get Tough” disciplinary practices • Disconnect between academic & behavior instruction • Low/non-data based decision making • Too many competing initiative • Overuse of outside expertise • Overuse of “train-n-hope” professional development • Short-term implementation & investment • Adoption of non-evidence-based practices • Inaccurate/incomplete implementation of best-practices • Inequitable access to supports

  6. Main Message! Successful Individual student behavior support is linked to host environments or school climates that are effective, efficient, relevant, & durable (Zins & Ponti, 1990)

  7. Lead w/ a team • Emphasize prevention • Adopt evidence-based practices • Give high priority to 3-4 year commitment • Decide w/ data • Increase local capacity & expertise • Implement with natural implementers • Embed staff development w/in on-going routines Adopt Systems Perspective

  8. Supporting Social Competence & Academic Achievement What is SWPBS: 4 PBS? OUTCOMES Supporting Decision Making Supporting Staff Behavior DATA SYSTEMS PRACTICES Supporting Student Behavior

  9. Implementation Levels State District School Classroom Student

  10. PBS Systems Implementation Logic Visibility Political Support Funding Leadership Team Active Coordination Evaluation Training Coaching Local School Teams/Demonstrations

  11. Organizational Features Common Vision ORGANIZATION MEMBERS Common Experience Common Language

  12. Team GENERAL IMPLEMENTATION PROCESS Agreements Data-based Action Plan Evaluation Implementation

  13. Behavioral Capacity Priority & Status Representation Team Data-based Decision Making Administrator Communications

  14. Enhanced PBS Implementation Logic

  15. School-wide Positive Behavior Support Systems Classroom Setting Systems Non-classroom Setting Systems Individual Student Systems Start here School-wide Systems

  16. Concluding “Big Ideas” • Link effective practices to host environment • Invest in intensifying continuum of behavior support • Teach & encourage expected behavior to reduce problem behavior • Link individual to school-wide behavior support • Use data to guide behavior support decisions

  17. Have a great summer & school year! George.sugai@uconn.edu www.pbis.org www.swis.org