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London Western Riverside Study: Phase 1

London Western Riverside Study: Phase 1

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London Western Riverside Study: Phase 1

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  1. London Western Riverside Study: Phase 1 Presented by: John Leaman & Philip Downing, MORI 12th December 2002

  2. Contents • Overview of attitudes towards recycling • Recycling behaviour - who, when and what? • Attitudes towards local recycling services • Responsibility for recycling • Information and awareness - how informed and aware are residents? • Social normalisation - is recycling considered a ‘normal’ activity? • Household Psychology • Communicating the recycling message

  3. Methodology • 2,023 interviews conducted with residents aged 16+, face-to-face and in-home between 09 Oct - 26 Nov 2002 • Quotas and weighting (age, gender, work status and ethnicity) to ensure representative sample of residents • 500 interviews in each borough - 300 interviews across the borough as a whole and a further 200 interviews in a designated ‘trial’ area. • Unless stated otherwise, the results for the Western Riverside area as a whole and individual boroughs do not include the ‘trial’ areas - these are analysed separately

  4. Utilising other waste & recycling research • Public Attitudes Towards Recycling and Waste Management - MORI/Prime Minister’s Strategy Unit, 2002 • Household Waste Behaviour in London: Phase I and II - Resource Recovery Forum/Brook Lyndhurst/MORI, 2001/2 • Recycling Used Packaging from the Domestic Waste Stream: Consumer Awareness and Education - INCPEN/MORI, 1999 • Qualitative and quantitative studies by the MORI Local Government team for a range of local authorities, including some new approaches to research (e.g. photograph pre-tasking exercises, deliberative workshops)

  5. 1. An overview of attitudes to Recycling

  6. Recycling is considered very worthwhile... Q Overall, how worthwhile or not do you think recycling household rubbish is? Don’t know/ no opinion 2% Not at all worthwhile Not very worthwhile Very worthwhile Fairly worthwhile Base: 1,300 residents aged 16+, face-to-face, in-home, London Western Riverside, October-November 2002, Waste Watch/MORI

  7. …but it is not a high salience issue • Concerned about disposal of society’s waste 94% • Important environmental issue? (prompted) 34% • But important environmental issue? (unprompted) 7% “While the public considers the disposal of society’s waste a significant environmental concern, it is not an issue at the forefront of their minds. The transient nature in which it is considered appears insufficient to establish and maintain habitual patterns of recycling” From Public Attitudes Towards Recycling and Waste Management, Strategy Unit/MORI, 2002 Base: 2,005 residents aged 15+, Great Britain, face-to-face, in-home, May-June 1999

  8. Recycling - positive views Q What, if anything, would you say are positive things about recycling? (unprompted) Helps protect the environment Saves resources/trees Reduces household rubbish being buried/landfill Reduces pollution ‘Right thing to do’ Good for the economy/cheaper For future generations/children Saves space in my home Nothing Base: 1,300 residents aged 16+, face-to-face, in-home, London Western Riverside, October-November 2002, Waste Watch/MORI

  9. Q And what, if anything, would you say are negative things about recycling? (unprompted) Difficult/hassle/effort 15% Poor recycling services 7% More expensive 5% Takes up too much space in the home 4% 48% Nothing Base: 1,300 residents aged 16+, face-to-face, in-home, London Western Riverside, October-November 2002, Waste Watch/MORI Recycling - negative views

  10. 2. Recycling Behaviour

  11. Difficulties with behavioural questions • Potential for people to ‘over-report’ their behaviour - particularly when it is about a socially desirable activity • MORI National survey in 1999 - as many as 67% said they recycle* • Need to change the way we ask questions to control for this problem - this study has used a much more stringent classification for levels of recycling • Results are much lower than previously and more realistic *Source: Recycling Used Packaging from the Domestic Waste Stream, INCPEN/MORI, 1999 - 2,005 adults 15+, face-to-face, in-home, May-June 1999

  12. Q Looking at this card, which, if any, of the following statements comes closest to how much you recycle? %2002 (1) % 2001 (2) 11 Everything that can be recycled 33 30 A lot but not everything that can be recycled 22 29 I do not recycle much 26 29 I do not recycle anything 19 Base: (1) 1,300 residents 16+, face-to-face, in-home, London Western Riverside, Oct-Nov 2002, Waste Watch/MORI; (2) 1,009 residents 16+, face-to-face, in-home, London, July-Aug 2001, RRF/Brook Lyndhurst/MORI Levels of recycling

  13. Recycling typologies “High recyclers” -15% • More than usually: • Female • aged 45-64 • Social class ABC1 • Private dwellings • White British • Working • No children • Receptive to recycling, composting and ‘green’ consumerism

  14. Recycling typologies “Mid recyclers” - 42% • More than usually: • Female • aged 25-44 • Social class C1 • White British • Recycle regularly but limited number of materials - do not compost and are not ‘green’ consumers • Receptive to receiving more information

  15. Recycling typologies “low/non-active recyclers” - 43% • More than usually: • Male • aged 16-24 • Social class DE • High rise flats • Social renters • Black/Black British • students/unemployed • They are not receptive to receiving information on recycling

  16. Q How often, if at all, do you recycle the following everyday items? If you don’t use an item, please tell me. % always % most/some times % rarely/never Newspaper/paper 35 24 41 Magazines/brochures 33 24 43 Glass bottles 30 24 46 Old clothes/shoes 20 34 47 Glass jars 28 23 48 Card/cardboard 20 20 60 Carrier bags 14 23 63 Base:All who use each material, 16+, face-to-face, in-home, London Western Riverside, October-November 2002, Waste Watch/MORI The more frequently recycled items...

  17. … and the less frequent Q How often, if at all, do you recycle the following everyday items? If you don’t use an item, please tell me. % always % most/sometimes % rarely/never Drink cans Food tins Plastic bottles Garden organic rubbish Fruit juice/milk cartons Kitchen organic rubbish Kitchen foil Base: All who use each material, 16+, face-to-face, in-home, London Western Riverside, October-November 2002, Waste Watch/MORI

  18. Range of materials recycled • Previous work in 2001 showed that recycling behaviour was almost entirely limited to paper and glass - even among ‘high’ recyclers. Only one in five households in London recycled anything else* • This pattern is still evident in the Western Riverside overall • BUT, signs that ‘high’ recyclers now seem to be expanding the range of materials they recycle - ‘pioneer’ group *Source:1,009 residents aged 16+, face-to-face, in-home, London, July-August 2001, RRF/Brook Lyndhurst/MORI

  19. Q How often, if at all, do you recycle the following everyday items? If you don’t use an item, please tell me. % always % most/some times % rarely/never Newspaper/paper 82 16 2 Glass bottles 77 15 8 Card/cardboard 56 17 27 Food tins 53 17 30 Plastic bottles 36 16 47 Fruit juice/milk cartons 29 13 58 Kitchen organic rubbish 16 13 71 Base: 157 residents who recycle everything that can be recycled, 16+, face-to-face, in-home, London Western Riverside,October-November 2002, Waste Watch/MORI Recycling behaviour among ‘high’ recyclers

  20. Change in recycling behaviour Q Would you say that you recycle more, less or about the same amount as you did a year ago? Don’t know More Less About the same Base: 1,300 residents aged 16+, face-to-face, in-home, London Western Riverside, October-November 2002, Waste Watch/MORI

  21. Reasons for increasing amount of recycling Q Why do you say you recycle more than a year ago? Top 5 reasons More awareness/hear more about it More facilities available now Been given bins/bags for recycling Offered a better collection service Influenced by family/friends Base: 222 residents aged 16+ who say they recycle more than they did a year ago, face-to-face, in-home, London Western Riverside, October-November 2002

  22. Reasons for decreasing amount of recycling Q Why do you say you recycle less than a year ago? Top 5 reasons Poor/less facilities available Only recently moved here/don’t know where facilities are Lack of time No information about what to do with it Not essential Base: 137 residents aged 16+ who say they recycle less than they did a year ago, face-to-face, in-home, London Western Riverside, October-November 2002

  23. Green Consumerism Q How often, if at all, do you do any of the following? If you don’t use an item, please tell me. % always % most/sometimes % rarely/never Pass on unwanted furniture/ appliances Buy refills/concentrated products Decline extra plastic bags Purchase ‘bags for life’ Pass on left over paint Compost at home Use the mailing preference service Use washable nappies Base: All who use each material, 16+, face-to-face, in-home, London Western Riverside,October-November 2002, Waste Watch/MORI

  24. 3. Attitudes towards Recycling Services

  25. Satisfaction with Council recycling facilities Q Thinking about the recycling facilities your local council provides, how satisfied or dissatisfied are you with . . . .? Net ±% % Satisfied % Dissatisfied Accessibility of recycling services +12 The provision of recycling facilities overall +10 The range of recyclables you are able to deposit +8 The provision of recycling facilities at your local tip +10 Base: 1,300 residents aged 16+, face-to-face, in-home, London Western Riverside, October-November 2002, Waste Watch/MORI

  26. Satisfaction with Council recycling facilities Q How satisfied or dissatisfied are you with the provision of recycling facilities overall? Net ±% % Satisfied % Dissatisfied +22 Kensington & Chelsea +10 Wandsworth +9 Lambeth -3 Hammersmith & Fulham Base: 1,300 residents aged 16+, face-to-face, in-home, London Western Riverside, October-November 2002, Waste Watch/MORI

  27. Satisfaction with Council recycling facilities Q How satisfied or dissatisfied are you with the provision of recycling facilities overall? Net ±% % Satisfied % Dissatisfied +19 Kensington&Chelsea trial +54 Wandsworth trial -32 Lambeth trial +14 Hammersmith&Fulham trial Base: 1,300 residents aged 16+, face-to-face, in-home, London Western Riverside, October-November 2002, Waste Watch/MORI

  28. Problems with household collection service • One in three report one or more problems with their kerbside collection service. Main issues (unprompted) include: • Not collected/not collected regularly (10%) • range of materials collected (7%) • Specifics of the bins/bags - e.g. no lid, too small (7%) • 64% do not report any problems Base: 472 residents who have access to a kerbside collection service,16+, face-to-face, in-home, London Western Riverside, October-November 2002 Waste Watch/MORI

  29. Problems with recycling banks Q What problems, if any, have you had with local recycling banks? (unprompted) Not emptied regularly Don’t collect wide enough range of materials Not accessible Not clean/maintained Lack information on what can/can’t be recycled Don’t know where they are Other None of these Don’t know Base: 577 residents who have access to a recycling bank,16+, face-to-face, in-home, London Western Riverside, October-November 2002, Waste Watch/MORI

  30. Q I’d like you to tell me to what extent you agree or disagree with each statement. Net ±% % Agree % Disagree The amount I recycle is limited by the kinds of things that the council accepts for recycling +29 21 50 I don’t believe the council actually does recycle all of the items collected for recycling -14 34 20 Base: 1,300 residents aged 16+, face-to-face, in-home, London Western Riverside, October-November 2002, Waste Watch/MORI Attitudes towards council recycling

  31. Recycling facilities gone bad

  32. Recycling gone bad II

  33. Qualitative evidence - link with ‘liveability’ • “They look horrible and messy. When you look at them they are disgusting” • Female, 25-40, Social class ABC1, Greenwich • “I go back and nobody’s emptied it, and because they haven’t emptied it, it then gets vandalised” • Female, 25-40, Social class ABC1, Greenwich • “I’ve seen it put out there [collection service] and come back home and there’s paper all over” • Male, 25-40, Social class ABC1, Greenwich • “Instead of having gaudy colours, I think they could have variants of the same colour like a subtle green • Male, 25-40, Social class ABC1, Greenwich • Source: Public Attitudes Towards Recycling and Waste Management, • Strategy Unit/MORI, 2002

  34. 4. Responsibility for Recycling

  35. Who should be responsible? Q Which three or four of the following, if any, do you think should be responsible for increasing levels of recycling? Local councils UK Government Companies who make products and packaging Supermarkets Individuals/General public Businesses in general/your place of work Schools EU Commission/Parliament Environmental groups Small shops Base: 1,300 residents aged 16+, face-to-face, in-home, London Western Riverside, October-November 2002, Waste Watch/MORI

  36. Responsibility for Waste (Continued)

  37. 5. Information and Awareness

  38. Q How well informed would you say you are about each of the following? % Informed % Not informed Net ±% +23 What the benefits of recycling are 36 59 What materials can and cannot be recycled in your area +4 45 49 What recycling services are provided in the local area -11 52 41 What types of recycled products you can buy -14 54 40 What happens to materials after they are collected -51 70 19 Campaigns/promotions in the local area -56 74 18 Base: 1,300 residents aged 16+, face-to-face, in-home, London Western Riverside, October-November 2002, Waste Watch/MORI Information available on recycling

  39. Information about what can and can’t be recycled Age 16-24 25-34 35-54 55-64 65+ Ethnicity White British Black Social class ABC1 C2DE Base: 1,300 residents aged 16+, face-to-face, in-home, London Western Riverside, October-November 2002, Waste Watch/MORI

  40. Information about what can and can’t be recycled Tenure Owner occupied Social rented Private-rented Level of recycling High + medium low Boroughs Lambeth H&F K&C Wandsworth Base: 1,300 residents aged 16+, face-to-face, in-home, London Western Riverside, October-November 2002, Waste Watch/MORI

  41. Information about recycling services locally Age 16-24 25-34 35-54 55-64 65+ Ethnicity White British Black Social class ABC1 C2DE Base: 1,300 residents aged 16+, face-to-face, in-home, London Western Riverside, October-November 2002, Waste Watch/MORI

  42. Information about recycling services locally Length of residency Under 2 years Over 2-10 years Over 10 years Level of recycling High + medium low Boroughs Lambeth H&F K&C Wandsworth Base: 1,300 residents aged 16+, face-to-face, in-home, London Western Riverside, October-November 2002, Waste Watch/MORI

  43. Awareness of what can be recycled Q To the best of your knowledge, which of the following things can and cannot be recycled in this area? Net ±% % Can % Can’t +85 Newspapers and magazines +84 Glass bottles and jars +54 Food and drink cans +52 Card/cardboard +50 Old clothes/shoes +21 Plastic bottles Fruit juice/milk cartons +6 Garden and kitchen organic rubbish +6 Base: 1,300 residents aged 16+, face-to-face, in-home, London Western Riverside, October-November 2002, Waste Watch

  44. Problems with information about composting • “I have only heard stories about composting but what I have heard is in the summer it really reeks and is covered in flies” • Female, 25-40, Social class C1C2, Greenwich • “People don’t know how to go about composting. I have no idea, you just put it in a bin and then what?” • Female, 25-40, Social class C1C2, Greenwich • “I was going to ask somebody if they knew what that little brown one was for because I don’t know” • Male, 30-45, Social class C1C2, Daventry • Source: Public Attitudes Towards Recycling and Waste Management, • Strategy Unit/MORI, 2002

  45. Information required by residents Q I’d like you to tell me to what extent you agree or disagree with each statement. Net ±% % Agree % Disagree I need more information on what can and can’t be recycled +47 +23 I need to know more about the benefits of recycling I don’t know what recycling facilities are on offer in the area +8 Base: 1,300 residents aged 16+, face-to-face, in-home, London Western Riverside, October-November 2002, Waste Watch/MORI

  46. 6. The impact of social normalisation or “Peer Pressure”

  47. Demand for collective action • “Why should I bother, nobody else does” • Male, 35-50, Social class C2DE, Pendle • “everybody’s got to do a little bit for it make a big difference” • Male, 25-40, Social class ABC1, Greenwich • “What could motivate me to do more is to see that as a nation as a whole we are doing it” • Male, 25-40, Social class ABC1, Greenwich • Source: Public Attitudes Towards Recycling and Waste Management, • Strategy Unit/MORI, 2002

  48. Q What proportion of households in this area do you think recycle or compost? 11% Nobody (0%) 26% One in ten (10%) 17% Two in ten (20%) Mean 25% 14% Three in ten (30% 9% Four in ten (40%) 7% Five in ten (half) 3% Six in ten (60%) 3% Seven in ten (70%) 2% Eight in ten (80%) 1% Nine in ten (90%) Everyone (100%) *% Base: 1,300 residents aged 16+, face-to-face, in-home, London Western Riverside, October-November 2002, Waste Watch/MORI Do people think others around them recycle?

  49. Potential for social norms Q To what extent do you agree or disagree with the statement “I would recycle more if everyone else was doing it”? Don’t know Strongly disagree Strongly agree Tend to disagree Tend to agree Neither/nor Base: 1,300 residents aged 16+, face-to-face, in-home, London Western Riverside, October-November 2002, Waste Watch/ MORI

  50. Impact of social norms on recycling % none/one in ten % two-four in ten % five+ in ten High recyclers Medium recyclers Low recyclers Base: 1,300 residents aged 16+, face-to-face, in-home, London Western Riverside, October-November 2002, Waste Watch/MORI