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CAP Glider Briefing - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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CAP Glider Briefing
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  1. CAP Glider Briefing All Cadets are expected to complete the CAP/SSA Wingrunner Course Prior to participating tin Glider Ground or Flight Operations

  2. CAP Glider Briefing 0800 – 0815 :Arrival Time & Sign In  -  Administrative Responsibility is the participating Squadrons 0815 – 0830 -         Safety & Operations Briefing 0830 – 0900           Set up Flight Line, Glider Preflight, Glider Staging

  3. CAP Glider Briefing 0900  First Glider Flight, additional flights continue about every 15 minutes. 0900 – End –         Glider flights using up to three gliders TBSS Blanik L-13, Grob 103. & Schweizer 2-32

  4. CAP Glider Briefing Cadets participate in launch operations. Every cadet will learn to and practice glider hook-up, glider hand signals and wing running.  Cadets receive off-line sit-in-the cockpit familiarization, preflight instruction, ballast requirements, airport familiarization including traffic pattern, signs runway marking and area airspace restrictions. Side trips can be arranged to Skydive City.

  5. CAP Glider Briefing Last Item               Prior to departure the cadet’s wash gliders and secure at tie downs.

  6. CAP Glider Briefing CAP Cadet Glider Orientation Flight Program Safety, Ground & Flight

  7. CAP Glider Briefing This briefing presents an overview of the safety, ground and flight operations at Tampa Bay Soaring Society (TBSS). It specifically covers Safety and Operations when participating in the Civil Air Patrol Cadet Glider Orientation Flight Program.

  8. CAP Glider Briefing  It is important for your safety that you follow these simple procedures while participating in ground and flight activities at the TBSS facilities. We at TBSS and your CAP squadron want everyone to have fun, but we also want you to be safe.

  9. CAP Glider Briefing General Policy CAP Senior Members will ensure that all activities during this program are safe.  Cadets will be used for all launching duties except for driving the golf carts or other vehicles on the flightline. 

  10. CAP Glider Briefing General Policy   When cadets are launching gliders, a CAP senior will be located in position near the cadet performing the launch.  The cadet will do the job and the supervisor/safety observer will ensure that it is done safely and correctly.

  11. CAP Glider Briefing Golf Cart Policy The TBSS golf carts and other vehicles will be operated only by TBSS members and CAP senior members.  Cadets are prohibited from operating the golf carts. There will be no exceptions to this policy.

  12. CAP Glider Briefing General TBSS Site Requirements Generally, CAP members will be allowed to use all of the TBSS facilities. The site consists of Approved Areas and Off Limits Areas. Specifically these are:

  13. CAP Glider Briefing Approved Areas Clubhouse Area – (includes the office, restroom, kitchen, and repair shop. Parking Area – (areas under the trees east of the ditch. No vehicles allowed on the flightline.

  14. CAP Glider Briefing Approved Areas Dispatch/Manifest Area – The area under the trees with the tables near the glider tiedown area. Glider Tiedown Area - The area in front of the dispatch area Launch Staging Area – The area behind the small red flags on the grass

  15. CAP Glider Briefing Approved Areas Launch and Recovery Area - The area west of the staging area to the runway Caution and Total Situation Awareness is required in this area Runway and Taxiways – Extreme Caution and total Situation Awareness is required in this area

  16. CAP Glider Briefing Off Limits Areas Wooded Areas – The areas north and south of the clubhouse Ditch – The area between the clubhouse and flightline Refrigerators – In the Clubhouse Hangars & Glider Trailers - These are privately owned

  17. CAP Glider Briefing Inspection of Gliders All gliders used for CAP Cadet Glider Orientation Flights will comply with all the Federal Aviation Regulations; CAP Regulations, Florida Wing CAP Regulations and the Rules and Policies of the Tampa Bay Soaring Society, Inc.  This means that the Annual Inspection or 100 hour inspection is current. 

  18. CAP Glider Briefing Inspection of Gliders   All gliders used for this program will be inspected using a CAP Form 71.  A CAP Member holding FAA and CAP CFI-G rating must perform these inspections. The original Form 71s will be maintained by TBSS in the CAP files with copies sent to the FLWG Glider Program Manager and subsequently to FLWG Director of Operations.

  19. CAP Glider Briefing Ground Handling of Gliders Ground handling of gliders is part of the cadet training. After a short orientation, the visiting cadets will provide all of the manpower to move the gliders from the tiedowns to the staging area and then to the runway for launching

  20. CAP Glider Briefing Ground Handling of Gliders Gliders may be moved by manually pushing them and guiding them or they may be pulled by the TBSS golf carts. Occasionally automobiles or trucks may be used to pull the gliders. The wingrunner guides the glider from the left wing tip. A safety person at the right wing tip ensures that the glider wing clears all objects. 

  21. CAP Glider Briefing Ground Handling of Gliders   The speed that the glider is moved should be the speed of a normal walk.

  22. CAP Glider Briefing Glider Staging Gliders will be staged on the grass area adjacent to the runway.  The staging area is behind a line that runs from the “hold short” markings on the south and midfield runway entrances (taxiways).  The staging area is where pilots and passengers board the gliders, strap-in and prepare for flight. 

  23. CAP Glider Briefing Glider Staging It is important for the next flight to be ready before the tow plane lands. This means that the passenger and pilot are in the glider with seat harnesses fastened and that the initial pre-takeoff checklist has been accomplished. The golf cart should be hooked up, slack removed from the towline and ready to tow to the runway.

  24. CAP Glider Briefing Glider Staging The wingrunner should be at the left wingtip and ready to walk the wing to the runway.

  25. CAP Glider Briefing Glider Signals All hand signals will be given using Soaring Society of America (SSA) Standard Ground Launch signals.  These are shown in the Wingrunner Course.  NOTE: Have extra copies on site available for distribution. Demonstrate the signals during the briefing. Have the cadets perform the signals. .

  26. CAP Glider Briefing Glider Signals All hand signals will be given using Soaring Society of America (SSA) Standard Ground Launch signals.  These are shown in the Wingrunner Course.  NOTE: Have extra copies on site available for distribution. Demonstrate the signals during the briefing. Have the cadets perform the signals. .

  27. CAP Glider Briefing Moving Glider to Runway When the tow plane has landed, and the glider crew is ready, the wing walker signals the golf cart driver to move to the runway. The golf cart driver heads for the designated spot on the runway.  This is at the center of the runway approximately 200 feet behind the tow plane. 

  28. CAP Glider Briefing Moving Glider to Runway   The golf cart driver proceeds across the center of the runway. When the glider approaches the center of the runway, the glider pilot releases the towline and stops the glider at the center of the runway using the glider’s brakes. The golf cart is driven behind the glider and stopped on the grass at the side of the runway. 

  29. CAP Glider Briefing Moving Glider to Runway The golf cart remains at location until after the glider is launched.  This is so that the golf cart will be available if the glider has to be rapidly removed from the runway.

  30. CAP Glider Briefing Glider Positioning The glider is rotated 90 degrees and aligned so that the nose of the glider is pointed directly at the tail of the tow plane. Three different techniques are required for this, because TBSS uses three types of gliders. These techniques are:

  31. CAP Glider Briefing Glider Positioning 1.      Blanik L-13 gliders are simply rotated on the pivoting tail wheel.

  32. CAP Glider Briefing Glider Positioning 2.      Grob 103 glider must have the tail pushed down to lift the nose wheel off of the ground while the wingrunner pivots the glider on the main wheel with rear wheel off the ground.

  33. CAP Glider Briefing Glider Positioning 3.      Schweizer 2-32 glider must have the tail pushed down to lift the nose skid off of the ground while the wingrunner pivots the glider on the main wheel with rear wheel off the ground.

  34. CAP Glider Briefing Glider Positioning Immediately after positioning the tail of the glider, the cadet moving the tail of the glider leaves the runway and waits near the golf cart.

  35. CAP Glider Briefing Glider Positioning When the glider is positioned, the wingrunner places the left wing on the ground. In a slight wind, it is permissible to hold the wing tip in position on the ground with a foot.

  36. CAP Glider Briefing Towline Hookup The towline hookup person retrieves the towline, and drags the glider end of the towline to the nose of the glider.  TBSS uses a white whiffle ball to reduce wear at the tow ring connection. The tow ring is usually inside the whiffle ball.

  37. CAP Glider Briefing Towline Hookup  The hookup person ensures that there are no loops or knots in the towline as he moves to the front of the glider.  Never rush the glider pilot to hook up he is running through a pre takeoff checklist  The hookup person will use the standard open and close hand signals.

  38. CAP Glider Briefing Towline Hookup Make the tow line hook up only after the glider pilot authorizes hookup. After hookup, the hookup person quickly leaves the runway and goes to the area on the grass near the golf cart. TBSS gliders have two different types of glider tow release mechanism.  These require different towline rings.  These are: .

  39. CAP Glider Briefing Towline Hookup 1.      TOST System – Blanik L-13 & Grob 103 – uses small ring

  40. CAP Glider Briefing Towline Hookup 2.      Schweizer System –Schweizer 2-32  –  uses large ring.

  41. CAP Glider Briefing Wingrunner The wingrunner should be at the left wing tip of the glider with the wing tip positioned on the ground.  The wing runner gives the hand signals to the tow pilot to taxi forward to  take up slack in the towline. As the towline tightens, the wingrunner gives the slowdown and stop signals.

  42. CAP Glider Briefing Wingrunner When the towline is tight with no loops or knots, the wingrunner looks at the glider pilot for thumbs up hand signal. This means that the pilot is ready to launch immediately.

  43. CAP Glider Briefing Pattern Check & CTAF Monitoring Before and after the Thumbs Up signal, the wingrunner checks the pattern down wind, base and final legs to ensure that the pattern is clear of landing aircraft.

  44. CAP Glider Briefing Pattern Check & CTAF Monitoring The wing runner supervisor should be monitoring the airport CATF radio frequency on a handheld radio other aircraft landing or taking off on other runways. The tow pilot is also monitoring this radio.

  45. CAP Glider Briefing Launching When all is clear, the wingrunner lifts the wing holding the back of the wingtip so that both wings are the same distance off of the ground (level). The wing should be held lightly so that it will fly out of the wingrunner’s hand as the glider moves down the runway. 

  46. CAP Glider Briefing Launching When running the wing, it is important to only assist in balancing the wing, not to hold the wing down, push forward, or hold back.  The tow pilot and the glider pilot exchange rudder waggle ready signals. At this point the wingrunner gives the circular signal to takeoff. 

  47. CAP Glider Briefing Launching The  tow pilot applies power and the glider starts to move down the runway.  The wing runner runs several steps holding the wing without pushing up or down on the wing. As the tow plane and glider in tow pick up speed, the glider wing will fly out of the wingrunner’s hand and the glider will be on its way. 

  48. CAP Glider Briefing Launching The wingrunner and supervisor leave the runway immediately.

  49. CAP Glider Briefing Aborted Takeoff If the tow is aborted after the take off roll has begun and if the sailplane releases, it will clear the runway to the right and the tow plane to the left.

  50. CAP Glider Briefing Aborted Takeoff If the tow is aborted when both planes are aloft, then the glider will land straight ahead on the runway, or in an adjacent clear area, or on the runway after a 180-degree turn, depending upon altitude and wind conditions.