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930 – 937 Recognize examples of European Art Movements of the 20 th Century. Art/Architecture. * Number your paper 1-11 and: Identify the style of each of the following pieces of artwork. Describe the characteristics of each piece . 1. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

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930 – 937

    • Recognize examples of European Art Movements of the 20th Century
art architecture
Art/Architecture

* Number your paper 1-11 and:

  • Identify the style of each of the following pieces of artwork.
  • Describe the characteristics of each piece.
slide3

1.

1.

slide14

1

1

3

3

5

3

4.

2

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6

8

.

10.

11.

7

9.

modernism
Modernism:
  • A new art style of the pre-World War I period through the 1920s that rejected old forms, styles, values and attitudes of the previous era.
  • Modernist artists constantly experimented with and searched for new kinds of artistic style and expression including the strange, disturbing and even ugly to express their rejection of “old” values.
  • There are many examples of this new overall style of art in painting, architecture and music.
slide17

Functionalism (Architecture)

  • Style of architecture stressing the idea that design should be based on the purpose the building will serve or it’s function.
  • Functionalism rejected any and all ornamentation and focused instead on the practicality of design of clean, simple lines.
  • Examples:
    • Franco-Swiss architect Le Corbusier insisted that “a house is a machine for living in”.
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Functionalism

  • American Louis H. Sullivan led the Chicago school of architects in the 1890s.
    • Used steel, concrete and elevators to build new skyscrapers with limited exterior decoration.
  • American Frank Lloyd Wright (Sullivan’s student) used mass produced materials to build houses with low lines, open interiors and tried to blend it into it’s surroundings.

Frank Lloyd Wright design

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Functionalism

  • German architect Walter Gropius developed a new style of functionalism called the Bauhaus or “International Style”:
    • Merged strict functionalism with beauty in his designs using glass and iron in a multi-disciplinary approach.
    • In 1911 Gropius broke with tradition with his design of the Fagus Shoe Factory in Germany.
    • Mies van der Rohe followed Gropius in his design of the Lake Shore Apartments in Chicago (1948-51).
mies van der rohe
Mies Van der Rohe

Large glass blocks

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Post-Impressionism or Expressionists (painting)

  • Modern painting grew as a revolt

against French Impressionism which

attempted to copy images exactly as

they were.

  • Instead, they tried to capture the

momentary feeling or impression of

light falling in that instant on an ob-

ject or real life scene.

    • Claude Monet, “The Rowboat”
    • Pierre Renoir, “The Boating Party”
    • Camille Pissarro “Two Women

Chatting By the Sea”

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Post Impressionism or Expressionists

    • By 1890, this style developed as a way to portray the unseen world, the inner world of emotion and imagination.
    • Other later examples:
      • Vincent van Gogh “The Starry Night) 1889
      • Paul Gaugin, “Teapot and Fruit”, still life
      • Paul Cezanne, “Fruit”, 1856
      • Henry Matisse, “Woman Reading”, 1894
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Cubism (1900-20s)

    • Used abstract geometric shapes and overlapping planes and zig- zag lines to paint real-life objects.
    • Goal was to devalue previous art movements through a dramatic change and separate their art from the conventional understanding of perspective:
      • Pablo Picasso, Spanish artist working in Paris, “The Three Musicians”
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Picasso and War (1937-1945)

  • Guernica depicts the massacre after German planes bombed the city and 1,600 civilians on April 26, 1937, during the Spanish Civil War
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Cubism (1900-20s)

    • Used abstract geometric shapes and overlapping planes and zig- zag lines to paint real-life objects.
    • Goal was to devalue previous art movements through a dramatic change and separate their art from the conventional understanding of perspective:
      • Pablo Picasso, Spanish artist working in Paris, “The Three Musicians”
      • Wassily Kandinsky, viewed paintings as representations of mood not objects.
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Cubism: Georges Braque (1882-1963)

  • Painted with bright colors and unassembled forms until 1908, but changed styles after he was injured in WWI
  • Worked with Picasso
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Dadaism

    • It delighted in the non-sensicaland outrageous.
    • Believed that art had become meaningless and purposeless because of war and violence.
    • One rule: Don’t follow any rules!
      • Marcel Duchamp repainted the Mona Lisa…(with mustache!)
      • Jean Arp would drop shredded paper and then paint the pattern.
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Surrealism (1920’s – 1950’s)

    • Painted a world of the fantastic, wild, dream-like quality relying heavily on symbolism.
      • Salvador Dalí, “The Persistence of Memory”
      • Marc Chagall, “The Cattle Dealer”
      • Rene Magritte, “The Son of Man”
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Modernism in music paralleled those in music and was very similar to the emotional intensity of Expressionist artists of the day.

    • Igor Stravinsky, ballet “The Rite of Spring” (ballet)
    • Alban Berg, opera “Wozzeck”
    • Arnold Schonberg, composer who abandoned traditional harmony and tonality and used “atonal composition”. (pianoconcerto)
modern movies radio
Modern Movies &Radio
  • Traditional local forms of entertainment began to be replaced with more commercial, standardized forms of mass media.
    • The Great Train Robbery (1903)
    • “Birth of a Nation” – (1915) D. W. Griffith
    • Keystone Kops – Max Sennett
    • “Charlie Chaplin”, Mary Pickford, Lillian Gish, Douglas Fairbanks, Rudolph Valentino, Clara Bow were just some of the early “silent” movie stars.
    • Singer/dancers of the “sound” era of motion pictures included Ginger Rogers and Fred Astaire.
    • Foreign film-makers sometimes produced propaganda pictures such as Germany’s Lena Riefenstahl’s “Triumph of the Will” about Nazi Party.
    • Radio developed quickly following Guglielmo Marconi’s invention of the first wireless communication in 1901.