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21 st Century Literacy Skills

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  1. 21st Century Literacy Skills Sue Z. Beers suebeers@netins.net

  2. 21st Century Literacy… • What are the skills students will need to be “literate” in the 21st century? • What is the same? • What is new? • What is enhanced?

  3. www.polleverywhere.com http://www.polleverywhere.com/free_text_polls/LTE3MTA4MTQzMQ

  4. Alvin Toffler… “The illiterate of the 21st century will not be those who cannot read and write, but those who cannot learn, unlearn and relearn.”

  5. CLICK it! Connecting… • Learning: What’s happening inside the student’s mind; how content is being processed, organized and connected. • Instruction:What the teacher does to create the opportunities for students to engage in the learning process and how the teacher knows if students have learned the intended outcomes. • Content:What the expected learnings (benchmarks) are, the prerequisite skills needed, and how student readiness to learn the content is considered. • Kids:What impacts student’s ability to learn: individual readiness to learn, background and experience, motivation, personal needs, learning style and interests. Sue Z. Beers, 2006 suebeers@netins.net

  6. CLICK it… KIDS • Are they ready to learn? • Do they have adequate background knowledge about the topic? • Are there personal problems that might get in the way of the learning? • What is their learning style(s)? • What interests them? • What level of skill do they have relative to the task? • Do they see the task as relevant and meaningful? Kids don’t care how much you know… until they know how much you care. Sue Z. Beers, 2006 suebeers@netins.net

  7. CLICK it… LEARNING PROCESS • How prepared are students to learn? • How are students processing the knowledge and what evidence is there of their thought processes? • What thinking is involved in achieving the expected learning? • Are students evaluating their own effort / learning and do they have the skills to adjust their thinking when needed? • How is a joy of learning fostered? • Are students engaged in reflective activities? The brain only pays attention to that which is meaningful…and you can’t learn something new if you can’t connect it to something you already know. Sue Z. Beers, 2006 suebeers@netins.net

  8. CLICK it… CONTENT • What is the essential / important learning? Is it the “right stuff?” • How will content be differentiated for students of varying ability? • How rigorous is the content? • Do all students have equal access to the curriculum? • What background knowledge or prerequisite skills are needed to learn the new content? • How can the content be connected to other topics / other subjects / life? • What will it “look like” when students master the content? Preparing students for their future… Sue Z. Beers, 2006 suebeers@netins.net

  9. CLICK it… INSTRUCTION • Do activities match the learning that is expected? • How will classroom structure and grouping patterns be used? • What resources will be used? • How will the needs of all students be met (differentiation)? • Is the intended learning being measured? How is the assessment data used to guide instruction? • Do all students have equal opportunity in the classroom? • How is a climate of comfort, order and safety established? • Are the classroom activities / work the best use of time? Do they reflect best practice? “If teaching were the same as telling, we’d all be so smart we could hardly stand it.” - Mark Twain Sue Z. Beers, 2006 suebeers@netins.net

  10. SOME Sample CLICK’s… Sue Z. Beers, 2006 suebeers@netins.net

  11. Sue Z. Beers, 2006 suebeers@netins.net

  12. Sue Z. Beers, 2006 suebeers@netins.net

  13. What’s Different Today?

  14. What is different about kids today? Students CAN’T… BUT, Students CAN…

  15. Students are: • “Digital Natives” • Screenagers

  16. Hyperlinked Mind: • Input / Experience • Intensity / Duration

  17. Neuroplasticity: • New Thinking Patterns

  18. Digital Generation • Neural Networks - Visual memory - Processing - Learning skills • Processing Information • Intensive / Progressively challenging stimulation over extended periods of time

  19. Retention and Visuals • 2,500 pictures • 90 % accuracy after several days • 10 second exposure • 1 year = 63% • Oral information: 10% after 72 hours • Add picture content = 65% retention

  20. Changing How Students Learn… = Different preferences for learning! Understanding the Digital Generation / 21st Century Fluency Project By Age 21: • 10,000+ hours of video games • 250,000 emails and texts • 10,000 hours on phones • 20,000+ hours of TV • 500,000+ commercials • 9,000 hours in school • 4,000 hours reading (mostly unengaged!)

  21. Learning Preference #1 • 8-18 year olds in the US spend one quarter of their media time using multiple media • 24% of 12-18 year olds use another media most of the time while watching TV • Receive information quickly from multimedia sources • …at twitch speed

  22. Learning Preference #2 • Parallel Processing • Multitasking

  23. Learning Preference #3 • Students want pictures, sound, color, video FIRST and then text • Instruction generally presents text first and then pictures, sound, color, video. • Visual learners

  24. Learning Preference #4 • Classroom instruction delivered in logical – linear – sequential order • Students process by random access / hyperlink / connections

  25. Learning Preference #5 • Classroom – Students working alone • Students – “Digital Weapons of Mass Collaboration” – Twitter, Facebook, Social Networking, Blogs, Texting

  26. Learning Preference #6 • “Just in case” vs. “Just in time” • RELEVANCE!

  27. Learning Preference #7 • Motivation matters • What motivates? - Autonomy (choice) - Challenge - Mastery • Students want - Instant gratification - Immediate and deferred rewards

  28. Learning Preference #8 • Relevant • Active • Instantly useful • Fun!!!

  29. For more information: The Digital Generation by Ian Jukes, etal 21st Century Fluency Project : www.21stcenturyfluency.com

  30. Clear Targets!

  31. Top Skills Employers Want: • Professionalism/ Work Ethic • Oral / Written Communication • Teamwork / Collaboration • Critical Thinking / Problem-Solving • Reading Comprehension - Are They Really Ready to Work, 2006

  32. Moral of the Story… It’s not what you know, it’s what you can DO with what you know…

  33. Six Key Elements… • Core subjects • Learning skills • 21st Century tools • Real-world applications • Interdisciplinary themes • 21st Century assessments

  34. Common Core State Standards www.corestandards.org

  35. www.21stcenturyascd.wikispaces.com “Templates” page

  36. Lessons from My Kids… • Hold kids accountable for reading – make them read! • Give them the tools and strategies they need to be successful in their reading.

  37. What is Reading? THINKING from words on a page…

  38. Reading is the key to success in all content areas.

  39. Reading in school is different… PURPOSE CHOICE INTEREST BACKGROUND KNOWLEDGE

  40. Adults who have strong literacy skills are… • more likely to be employed, to have higher-status jobs, and to earn significantly more. • less likely to receive public assistance (or, if they do, they receive it for a shorter time). • more likely to read to their children, talk to them about school, and help with homework. • more likely to vote and to volunteer in their communities. 2003 National Assessment of Adult Literacy

  41. Intensive Intervention: • 1-2 grade levels behind • Based on specific needs • Extend to content areas • Reading specialist

  42. Engaging Text Discussion • Relevant • Follow-up • Small group

  43. Comprehension • Teach explicitly • Variety of texts • Guided and independent practice

  44. Vocabulary • Explicit instruction • Independent strategies • Multiple contexts

  45. Components of the Reading Process Classroom Environment: Comfort, Order, Safety The Learner: Attitudes, Ability and Perceptions • Reading Task: • Clarity • Purpose • Background Knowledge • Processing Strategies: • Pre-reading • During-reading • Post-Reading • Text Features: • Text Cues • Organizational Patterns • Text Selection Research-Based Classroom Instruction

  46. Independent Strategic Readers • Know how to make text make sense • Have strategies to use • Know how to struggle with text • Develop the patience and stamina to stick with a text • Know what is separating them from success with the text • Know what they should do to fix the problem